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cybertron1998
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6/4/2013 5:22:03 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
i don't know how it came into my head but i want to join the navy as a mechanic. in my most recent thinkings i've wanted to be an engineer or a videogame designer, but now i've moved to navy mechanic. i guess that can somewhat relate to both of those. but i just want to hear if its a good choice at this age or if i should think about it overtime?
Epsilon: There are so many stories where some brave hero decides to give their life to save the day, and because of their sacrifice, the good guys win, the survivors all cheer, and everybody lives happily ever after. But the hero... never gets to see that ending. They'll never know if their sacrifice actually made a difference. They'll never know if the day was really saved. In the end, they just have to have faith.
DakotaKrafick
Posts: 1,517
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6/4/2013 5:25:02 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/4/2013 5:22:03 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
i don't know how it came into my head but i want to join the navy as a mechanic. in my most recent thinkings i've wanted to be an engineer or a videogame designer, but now i've moved to navy mechanic. i guess that can somewhat relate to both of those. but i just want to hear if its a good choice at this age or if i should think about it overtime?

(1) I don't see how being a Navy mechanic relates to video-game design.

(2) I don't see how age relates to whether or not you should do the profession you most want to do.
cybertron1998
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6/4/2013 5:26:16 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/4/2013 5:25:02 PM, DakotaKrafick wrote:
At 6/4/2013 5:22:03 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
i don't know how it came into my head but i want to join the navy as a mechanic. in my most recent thinkings i've wanted to be an engineer or a videogame designer, but now i've moved to navy mechanic. i guess that can somewhat relate to both of those. but i just want to hear if its a good choice at this age or if i should think about it overtime?

(1) I don't see how being a Navy mechanic relates to video-game design.

(2) I don't see how age relates to whether or not you should do the profession you most want to do.

1) learning the inside out of vehicles and or weapons to have ideas for making them in game

2) should i decide now or think about it some more
Epsilon: There are so many stories where some brave hero decides to give their life to save the day, and because of their sacrifice, the good guys win, the survivors all cheer, and everybody lives happily ever after. But the hero... never gets to see that ending. They'll never know if their sacrifice actually made a difference. They'll never know if the day was really saved. In the end, they just have to have faith.
DakotaKrafick
Posts: 1,517
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6/4/2013 5:51:58 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/4/2013 5:26:16 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 6/4/2013 5:25:02 PM, DakotaKrafick wrote:
At 6/4/2013 5:22:03 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
i don't know how it came into my head but i want to join the navy as a mechanic. in my most recent thinkings i've wanted to be an engineer or a videogame designer, but now i've moved to navy mechanic. i guess that can somewhat relate to both of those. but i just want to hear if its a good choice at this age or if i should think about it overtime?

(1) I don't see how being a Navy mechanic relates to video-game design.

(2) I don't see how age relates to whether or not you should do the profession you most want to do.

1) learning the inside out of vehicles and or weapons to have ideas for making them in game

If you want to be a video-game designer, don't become something completely different and think "Well, maybe I can use what I learn in my years here to make a video-game off this someday". That's what research and consulting is for.

2) should i decide now or think about it some more

You shouldn't seek out a career based on a fickle or fleeting interest and I have no way of knowing whether or not that's the case here. I wanted to be a lawyer after playing Pheonix Wright for the first time, but that didn't last long. I think if you're unsure whether or not you're passionate enough about something to pursue it, chances are you aren't.
philochristos
Posts: 2,614
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6/4/2013 7:51:06 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/4/2013 5:22:03 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
i don't know how it came into my head but i want to join the navy as a mechanic. in my most recent thinkings i've wanted to be an engineer or a videogame designer, but now i've moved to navy mechanic. i guess that can somewhat relate to both of those. but i just want to hear if its a good choice at this age or if i should think about it overtime?

I was a nuclear mechanic in the navy. The difference between a nuclear mechanic and a conventional mechanic is that if you're a nuclear mechanic, you have to stay in the navy an extra two years, and you get to work on the primary side of the power plant (i.e. the systems directly associated with the reactor), whereas if you're a conventional mechanic, you work on the secondary side of the plant, and you're only committed for four years.

I can't speak for conventional mechanics, but as far as nuclear mechanics, you'll work longer hours and have less liberty than most other jobs. The reason is because when you pull into port, and one of the reactors shuts down, you'll have to stay on board to do shut down maintenance while everybody else goes on liberty. There were two reactors on my ship, and we'd take turns shutting one down during each port.

The work is pretty arduous, you'll be on a watch schedule that will leave you with a constant sleep deprivation, and the working conditions are hot and steamy.

There aren't many prospects for when you get out of the military unless you are a nuclear mechanic and you reenlist, giving you eight years of enlistment (2 years of school, and 6 years of work). That will give you enough experience to apply for jobs at civilian nuclear power plants.

The one big advantage, whether you're a conventional mechanic or a nuclear mechanic, is that you'll get the GI Billl, and it'll pay for your college. That is a HUGE plus. But keep in mind that the longer you delay college, the harder it will be to stay motivated enough to finish. Most people who enlist in the military never get a college degree. The longer you stay in the navy, the less likely you'll be to ever get a degree.

Advancement in the beginning is pretty fast if you're a nuke. You'll make E-4 by the time you finish school (which is about 1.5 years). AFter that, it'll be almost impossible to advance to E-5 unless you reenlist. Very few people make E-5 without reenlisting. If you do reenlist, there's a generous bonus if you're a nuke, and if you do it before the end of your two year point, you'll automatically make E-5.

The pay is slightly better for a nuke than for a conventional mechanic. When you're out at sea, you'll get Pro Pay, which is just a little extra pay for being a nuke.
"Not to know of what things one should demand demonstration, and of what one should not, argues want of education." ~Aristotle

"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." ~Aristotle
cybertron1998
Posts: 5,818
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6/4/2013 7:55:11 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/4/2013 7:51:06 PM, philochristos wrote:
At 6/4/2013 5:22:03 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
i don't know how it came into my head but i want to join the navy as a mechanic. in my most recent thinkings i've wanted to be an engineer or a videogame designer, but now i've moved to navy mechanic. i guess that can somewhat relate to both of those. but i just want to hear if its a good choice at this age or if i should think about it overtime?

I was a nuclear mechanic in the navy. The difference between a nuclear mechanic and a conventional mechanic is that if you're a nuclear mechanic, you have to stay in the navy an extra two years, and you get to work on the primary side of the power plant (i.e. the systems directly associated with the reactor), whereas if you're a conventional mechanic, you work on the secondary side of the plant, and you're only committed for four years.

I can't speak for conventional mechanics, but as far as nuclear mechanics, you'll work longer hours and have less liberty than most other jobs. The reason is because when you pull into port, and one of the reactors shuts down, you'll have to stay on board to do shut down maintenance while everybody else goes on liberty. There were two reactors on my ship, and we'd take turns shutting one down during each port.

The work is pretty arduous, you'll be on a watch schedule that will leave you with a constant sleep deprivation, and the working conditions are hot and steamy.

There aren't many prospects for when you get out of the military unless you are a nuclear mechanic and you reenlist, giving you eight years of enlistment (2 years of school, and 6 years of work). That will give you enough experience to apply for jobs at civilian nuclear power plants.

The one big advantage, whether you're a conventional mechanic or a nuclear mechanic, is that you'll get the GI Billl, and it'll pay for your college. That is a HUGE plus. But keep in mind that the longer you delay college, the harder it will be to stay motivated enough to finish. Most people who enlist in the military never get a college degree. The longer you stay in the navy, the less likely you'll be to ever get a degree.

Advancement in the beginning is pretty fast if you're a nuke. You'll make E-4 by the time you finish school (which is about 1.5 years). AFter that, it'll be almost impossible to advance to E-5 unless you reenlist. Very few people make E-5 without reenlisting. If you do reenlist, there's a generous bonus if you're a nuke, and if you do it before the end of your two year point, you'll automatically make E-5.

The pay is slightly better for a nuke than for a conventional mechanic. When you're out at sea, you'll get Pro Pay, which is just a little extra pay for being a nuke.

http://www.navy.com...
read this and you will understand
Epsilon: There are so many stories where some brave hero decides to give their life to save the day, and because of their sacrifice, the good guys win, the survivors all cheer, and everybody lives happily ever after. But the hero... never gets to see that ending. They'll never know if their sacrifice actually made a difference. They'll never know if the day was really saved. In the end, they just have to have faith.
philochristos
Posts: 2,614
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6/4/2013 8:20:34 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/4/2013 7:55:11 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:

http://www.navy.com...
read this and you will understand

That web page is a little misleading. It conflates many different jobs. For example, people who do maintenance on airplanes have a completely different job than people who work in the power plant. They go to different schools and everything. The jobs have nothing to do with each other. So you ought to be specific with your recruiter about which one of these jobs you want to do. Don't just say "mechanic," or else you'll end up signing up for something you didn't want to do.
"Not to know of what things one should demand demonstration, and of what one should not, argues want of education." ~Aristotle

"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." ~Aristotle
cybertron1998
Posts: 5,818
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6/4/2013 8:23:46 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/4/2013 8:20:34 PM, philochristos wrote:
At 6/4/2013 7:55:11 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:

http://www.navy.com...
read this and you will understand

That web page is a little misleading. It conflates many different jobs. For example, people who do maintenance on airplanes have a completely different job than people who work in the power plant. They go to different schools and everything. The jobs have nothing to do with each other. So you ought to be specific with your recruiter about which one of these jobs you want to do. Don't just say "mechanic," or else you'll end up signing up for something you didn't want to do.

ok i want to be the vehicular mechanic
Epsilon: There are so many stories where some brave hero decides to give their life to save the day, and because of their sacrifice, the good guys win, the survivors all cheer, and everybody lives happily ever after. But the hero... never gets to see that ending. They'll never know if their sacrifice actually made a difference. They'll never know if the day was really saved. In the end, they just have to have faith.
philochristos
Posts: 2,614
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6/4/2013 8:49:29 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/4/2013 8:23:46 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 6/4/2013 8:20:34 PM, philochristos wrote:
At 6/4/2013 7:55:11 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:

http://www.navy.com...
read this and you will understand

That web page is a little misleading. It conflates many different jobs. For example, people who do maintenance on airplanes have a completely different job than people who work in the power plant. They go to different schools and everything. The jobs have nothing to do with each other. So you ought to be specific with your recruiter about which one of these jobs you want to do. Don't just say "mechanic," or else you'll end up signing up for something you didn't want to do.

ok i want to be the vehicular mechanic

This is what you're looking for:

http://www.navycs.com...
"Not to know of what things one should demand demonstration, and of what one should not, argues want of education." ~Aristotle

"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." ~Aristotle
cybertron1998
Posts: 5,818
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6/4/2013 8:51:36 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/4/2013 8:49:29 PM, philochristos wrote:
At 6/4/2013 8:23:46 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 6/4/2013 8:20:34 PM, philochristos wrote:
At 6/4/2013 7:55:11 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:

http://www.navy.com...
read this and you will understand

That web page is a little misleading. It conflates many different jobs. For example, people who do maintenance on airplanes have a completely different job than people who work in the power plant. They go to different schools and everything. The jobs have nothing to do with each other. So you ought to be specific with your recruiter about which one of these jobs you want to do. Don't just say "mechanic," or else you'll end up signing up for something you didn't want to do.

ok i want to be the vehicular mechanic

This is what you're looking for:

http://www.navycs.com...

theres definitely more jobs than that
Epsilon: There are so many stories where some brave hero decides to give their life to save the day, and because of their sacrifice, the good guys win, the survivors all cheer, and everybody lives happily ever after. But the hero... never gets to see that ending. They'll never know if their sacrifice actually made a difference. They'll never know if the day was really saved. In the end, they just have to have faith.
leojm
Posts: 1,825
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6/6/2013 7:06:04 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/4/2013 5:22:03 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
i don't know how it came into my head but i want to join the navy as a mechanic. in my most recent thinkings i've wanted to be an engineer or a videogame designer, but now i've moved to navy mechanic. i guess that can somewhat relate to both of those. but i just want to hear if its a good choice at this age or if i should think about it overtime?

Well that really cool that you want to be a mechanic worker for the navy. You have to be very good in math. :P
It seems like an interesting field to go into. You will need to go through college and get your degree.
cybertron1998
Posts: 5,818
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6/6/2013 8:23:27 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/6/2013 7:06:04 AM, leojm wrote:
At 6/4/2013 5:22:03 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
i don't know how it came into my head but i want to join the navy as a mechanic. in my most recent thinkings i've wanted to be an engineer or a videogame designer, but now i've moved to navy mechanic. i guess that can somewhat relate to both of those. but i just want to hear if its a good choice at this age or if i should think about it overtime?

Well that really cool that you want to be a mechanic worker for the navy. You have to be very good in math. :P
It seems like an interesting field to go into. You will need to go through college and get your degree.

No you won't
Epsilon: There are so many stories where some brave hero decides to give their life to save the day, and because of their sacrifice, the good guys win, the survivors all cheer, and everybody lives happily ever after. But the hero... never gets to see that ending. They'll never know if their sacrifice actually made a difference. They'll never know if the day was really saved. In the end, they just have to have faith.
leojm
Posts: 1,825
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6/6/2013 8:31:59 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/6/2013 8:23:27 AM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 6/6/2013 7:06:04 AM, leojm wrote:
At 6/4/2013 5:22:03 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
i don't know how it came into my head but i want to join the navy as a mechanic. in my most recent thinkings i've wanted to be an engineer or a videogame designer, but now i've moved to navy mechanic. i guess that can somewhat relate to both of those. but i just want to hear if its a good choice at this age or if i should think about it overtime?

Well that really cool that you want to be a mechanic worker for the navy. You have to be very good in math. :P
It seems like an interesting field to go into. You will need to go through college and get your degree.

No you won't

Did you do research?
cybertron1998
Posts: 5,818
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6/6/2013 8:48:41 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/6/2013 8:31:59 AM, leojm wrote:
At 6/6/2013 8:23:27 AM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 6/6/2013 7:06:04 AM, leojm wrote:
At 6/4/2013 5:22:03 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
i don't know how it came into my head but i want to join the navy as a mechanic. in my most recent thinkings i've wanted to be an engineer or a videogame designer, but now i've moved to navy mechanic. i guess that can somewhat relate to both of those. but i just want to hear if its a good choice at this age or if i should think about it overtime?

Well that really cool that you want to be a mechanic worker for the navy. You have to be very good in math. :P
It seems like an interesting field to go into. You will need to go through college and get your degree.

No you won't

Did you do research?

Yes and you need a college transcript to become an officer but no degree
Epsilon: There are so many stories where some brave hero decides to give their life to save the day, and because of their sacrifice, the good guys win, the survivors all cheer, and everybody lives happily ever after. But the hero... never gets to see that ending. They'll never know if their sacrifice actually made a difference. They'll never know if the day was really saved. In the end, they just have to have faith.
leojm
Posts: 1,825
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6/6/2013 8:50:19 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/6/2013 8:48:41 AM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 6/6/2013 8:31:59 AM, leojm wrote:
At 6/6/2013 8:23:27 AM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 6/6/2013 7:06:04 AM, leojm wrote:
At 6/4/2013 5:22:03 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
i don't know how it came into my head but i want to join the navy as a mechanic. in my most recent thinkings i've wanted to be an engineer or a videogame designer, but now i've moved to navy mechanic. i guess that can somewhat relate to both of those. but i just want to hear if its a good choice at this age or if i should think about it overtime?

Well that really cool that you want to be a mechanic worker for the navy. You have to be very good in math. :P
It seems like an interesting field to go into. You will need to go through college and get your degree.

No you won't

Did you do research?

Yes and you need a college transcript to become an officer but no degree

ok. Well that's great that you want to be that. XD
ConservativePolitico
Posts: 8,210
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6/6/2013 4:05:03 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
My dad was in the Navy for 20 years, he liked it a lot. He got to see the world and I got to travel a lot too. You're away from your family A LOT though. Be forewarned.
wrichcirw
Posts: 11,196
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6/6/2013 7:01:00 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
If you're still deciding, I would get your degree and then commission. Join the ROTC, they will pay for your last two years of college, full ride.
At 8/9/2013 9:41:24 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you are civil with me, I will be civil to you. If you decide to bring unreasonable animosity to bear in a reasonable discussion, then what would you expect other than to get flustered?
cybertron1998
Posts: 5,818
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6/6/2013 8:50:33 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/6/2013 7:01:00 PM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you're still deciding, I would get your degree and then commission. Join the ROTC, they will pay for your last two years of college, full ride.

really?
Epsilon: There are so many stories where some brave hero decides to give their life to save the day, and because of their sacrifice, the good guys win, the survivors all cheer, and everybody lives happily ever after. But the hero... never gets to see that ending. They'll never know if their sacrifice actually made a difference. They'll never know if the day was really saved. In the end, they just have to have faith.
wrichcirw
Posts: 11,196
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6/7/2013 10:09:37 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/6/2013 8:50:33 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 6/6/2013 7:01:00 PM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you're still deciding, I would get your degree and then commission. Join the ROTC, they will pay for your last two years of college, full ride.

really?

I'd ask an ROTC rep at any university closeby to you to be certain. Then, research it, and don't rely upon military websites to give you the full story. Try your best to get first-hand accounts of people's stories.

The first two years they simply give you a stipend, but during the last two they know you are serious. Military benefits are actually quite good, and if you're smart about the job you get (i.e., don't go infantry), it can easily turn into a relatively safe, fulfilling career.

As it is, the grass is most definitely greener on the other side (enlisted vs commissioning). You will also be fast-tracked to an advanced degree, fully paid for by the military at whatever institution you qualify for. I've met many majors (O-4) that went to Ivy Leagues, full ride, and not on some sort of special scholarship.
At 8/9/2013 9:41:24 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you are civil with me, I will be civil to you. If you decide to bring unreasonable animosity to bear in a reasonable discussion, then what would you expect other than to get flustered?
darkkermit
Posts: 11,204
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6/7/2013 10:15:55 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/6/2013 8:50:33 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 6/6/2013 7:01:00 PM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you're still deciding, I would get your degree and then commission. Join the ROTC, they will pay for your last two years of college, full ride.

really?

But you also need to check out whether your university has Navy ROTC or not
Open borders debate:
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cybertron1998
Posts: 5,818
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6/8/2013 8:18:31 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/7/2013 10:09:37 PM, wrichcirw wrote:
At 6/6/2013 8:50:33 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 6/6/2013 7:01:00 PM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you're still deciding, I would get your degree and then commission. Join the ROTC, they will pay for your last two years of college, full ride.

really?

I'd ask an ROTC rep at any university closeby to you to be certain. Then, research it, and don't rely upon military websites to give you the full story. Try your best to get first-hand accounts of people's stories.

The first two years they simply give you a stipend, but during the last two they know you are serious. Military benefits are actually quite good, and if you're smart about the job you get (i.e., don't go infantry), it can easily turn into a relatively safe, fulfilling career.

As it is, the grass is most definitely greener on the other side (enlisted vs commissioning). You will also be fast-tracked to an advanced degree, fully paid for by the military at whatever institution you qualify for. I've met many majors (O-4) that went to Ivy Leagues, full ride, and not on some sort of special scholarship.

I could also do the undergrad program
Epsilon: There are so many stories where some brave hero decides to give their life to save the day, and because of their sacrifice, the good guys win, the survivors all cheer, and everybody lives happily ever after. But the hero... never gets to see that ending. They'll never know if their sacrifice actually made a difference. They'll never know if the day was really saved. In the end, they just have to have faith.
wrichcirw
Posts: 11,196
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6/9/2013 1:15:56 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/8/2013 8:18:31 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 6/7/2013 10:09:37 PM, wrichcirw wrote:
At 6/6/2013 8:50:33 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 6/6/2013 7:01:00 PM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you're still deciding, I would get your degree and then commission. Join the ROTC, they will pay for your last two years of college, full ride.

really?

I'd ask an ROTC rep at any university closeby to you to be certain. Then, research it, and don't rely upon military websites to give you the full story. Try your best to get first-hand accounts of people's stories.

The first two years they simply give you a stipend, but during the last two they know you are serious. Military benefits are actually quite good, and if you're smart about the job you get (i.e., don't go infantry), it can easily turn into a relatively safe, fulfilling career.

As it is, the grass is most definitely greener on the other side (enlisted vs commissioning). You will also be fast-tracked to an advanced degree, fully paid for by the military at whatever institution you qualify for. I've met many majors (O-4) that went to Ivy Leagues, full ride, and not on some sort of special scholarship.

I could also do the undergrad program

ROTC IS an undergrad program. The stuff I mentioned from the O-4s were graduate level programs, which were fully paid for by the military depending upon the needs of the military.

The idea is, the more valuable you make yourself, the less of a chance the military will d!ck you around while you're in - assuming of course you're on your best behavior. Commissioned officers are most certainly more valuable than any enlisted rank, and thus will get more privileges, etc. It's quite literally night and day.

DK is right too, make sure whatever college/university you go to actually has the appropriate ROTC program.
At 8/9/2013 9:41:24 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you are civil with me, I will be civil to you. If you decide to bring unreasonable animosity to bear in a reasonable discussion, then what would you expect other than to get flustered?
wrichcirw
Posts: 11,196
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6/9/2013 1:33:53 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
Anyway, I would most definitely think long and hard about the military BEFORE you join. Once you are in, you are locked in, so if you regret your choice, you will regret it for the entire length of your enlistment contract. I also sincerely doubt now that you can throw out the "gay card" to get a general discharge if you change your mind during training, so I'd definitely put a lot of thought into it, [EXTREMELY IMPORTANT] talk to more people than just your recruiter, and really, really think hard about whether or not you want to do the military before you get your degree. Once you are in, the military will attempt to get as much as they can out of you before throwing you any bones like a scholarship program, meaning that you're going to have to do it their way for most of your enlistment. That essentially means that if you want to get a degree while you're enlisted, you will be working full time and taking classes on the side. The classes will probably be covered by the military, and your chain of command will certainly look at it positively, but it is still a lot to manage. It's certainly a lot harder to do than to go to college full time, and do ROTC part time.

All this being said, if you do your homework and plan it out, the military is a very good career choice. I am considering JAG in the near future and possibly law school...after talking to some of the career counseling departments in law schools in my area, they were quite impressed by the pay and benefits inherent in a JAG career...they are second only to Big Law.
At 8/9/2013 9:41:24 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you are civil with me, I will be civil to you. If you decide to bring unreasonable animosity to bear in a reasonable discussion, then what would you expect other than to get flustered?