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I have my GED.

Eitan_Zohar
Posts: 2,697
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6/18/2013 12:22:45 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Please tell me more about how nuts I am to think of dropping out and what a failure I'll become.

My scores:

Math: 730
Writing: Not sure yet as they have to grade my essay, but I definitely passed.
Science: 800 (Perfect, yay!)
Social Studies: 680
Reading: 690

How test scores work: http://www.gedtestingservice.com...

I now cannot be legally compelled to go back to public school even if my parents forced me. I am free.

If I go into higher education it'll definitely be in Israel as the universities here are sh*ttier than the public schools (plus with the welfare model it will cost a lot less, too). I've heard of people who went to a university in Israel and later went to M.I.T., and found that it was actually on a lower-level than their previous university (Bar-Ilan, I think). So it doesn't make a lot of sense to do it in this backwards country.

Any advice (note that this does not give anyone leave to rant or condescend me while feigning pure motives with their "advice")?
"It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book."
ConservativePolitico
Posts: 8,210
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6/18/2013 12:27:44 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Congrats. I knew you'd be able to do it.

There are some good universities here in the States but if you do choose to study abroad for higher education I wish you luck and hope you find what you're looking for in your education.
Eitan_Zohar
Posts: 2,697
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6/18/2013 12:28:39 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/18/2013 12:27:44 PM, ConservativePolitico wrote:
Congrats. I knew you'd be able to do it.

There are some good universities here in the States but if you do choose to study abroad for higher education I wish you luck and hope you find what you're looking for in your education.

Actually, I'm an Israeli citizen as well. Thanks.
"It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book."
Eitan_Zohar
Posts: 2,697
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6/18/2013 12:29:53 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/18/2013 12:28:16 PM, Cody_Franklin wrote:
What do you plan to study?

Probably economics or philosophy. Economics sounds useful (and is definitely an interest), but I can't imagine not getting into philosophy, and OMG's comments convinced me that the best way to do that would be in a formal setting.
"It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book."
Cody_Franklin
Posts: 9,483
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6/18/2013 12:32:39 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I would recommend, if you are interested and could swing it, pairing philosophy or econ with something more concrete--perhaps a hard science, like physics or chemistry. If you want something that shares with philosophy a sort of rigorous, "pure-think" sort of discipline, you might also consider mathematics.
YYW
Posts: 36,289
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6/18/2013 12:32:41 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/18/2013 12:22:45 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
Please tell me more about how nuts I am to think of dropping out and what a failure I'll become.

My scores:

Math: 730
Writing: Not sure yet as they have to grade my essay, but I definitely passed.
Science: 800 (Perfect, yay!)
Social Studies: 680
Reading: 690

How test scores work: http://www.gedtestingservice.com...

I now cannot be legally compelled to go back to public school even if my parents forced me. I am free.

If I go into higher education it'll definitely be in Israel as the universities here are sh*ttier than the public schools (plus with the welfare model it will cost a lot less, too). I've heard of people who went to a university in Israel and later went to M.I.T., and found that it was actually on a lower-level than their previous university (Bar-Ilan, I think). So it doesn't make a lot of sense to do it in this backwards country.

Any advice (note that this does not give anyone leave to rant or condescend me while feigning pure motives with their "advice")?

Congrats, kiddo!

Really though, the US has most of the best universities in the world.
Tsar of DDO
YYW
Posts: 36,289
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6/18/2013 12:33:11 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/18/2013 12:32:39 PM, Cody_Franklin wrote:
I would recommend, if you are interested and could swing it, pairing philosophy or econ with something more concrete--perhaps a hard science, like physics or chemistry. If you want something that shares with philosophy a sort of rigorous, "pure-think" sort of discipline, you might also consider mathematics.

That is very good advice.
Tsar of DDO
ConservativePolitico
Posts: 8,210
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6/18/2013 12:34:40 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/18/2013 12:28:39 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:27:44 PM, ConservativePolitico wrote:
Congrats. I knew you'd be able to do it.

There are some good universities here in the States but if you do choose to study abroad for higher education I wish you luck and hope you find what you're looking for in your education.

Actually, I'm an Israeli citizen as well. Thanks.

Oh, I didn't know that. That's neat.
Eitan_Zohar
Posts: 2,697
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6/18/2013 12:35:32 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/18/2013 12:32:39 PM, Cody_Franklin wrote:
I would recommend, if you are interested and could swing it, pairing philosophy or econ with something more concrete--perhaps a hard science, like physics or chemistry. If you want something that shares with philosophy a sort of rigorous, "pure-think" sort of discipline, you might also consider mathematics.

Well, I'm very ill-equipped to study hard sciences.

How useful would mathematics be? I'm not interested in programming or engineering or anything like that, and I would assume economics teaches the necessary math in the course.
"It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book."
Eitan_Zohar
Posts: 2,697
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6/18/2013 12:35:57 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/18/2013 12:32:41 PM, YYW wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:22:45 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
Please tell me more about how nuts I am to think of dropping out and what a failure I'll become.

My scores:

Math: 730
Writing: Not sure yet as they have to grade my essay, but I definitely passed.
Science: 800 (Perfect, yay!)
Social Studies: 680
Reading: 690

How test scores work: http://www.gedtestingservice.com...

I now cannot be legally compelled to go back to public school even if my parents forced me. I am free.

If I go into higher education it'll definitely be in Israel as the universities here are sh*ttier than the public schools (plus with the welfare model it will cost a lot less, too). I've heard of people who went to a university in Israel and later went to M.I.T., and found that it was actually on a lower-level than their previous university (Bar-Ilan, I think). So it doesn't make a lot of sense to do it in this backwards country.

Any advice (note that this does not give anyone leave to rant or condescend me while feigning pure motives with their "advice")?

Congrats, kiddo!

Really though, the US has most of the best universities in the world.

Ya got proof?
"It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book."
ConservativePolitico
Posts: 8,210
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6/18/2013 12:37:26 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/18/2013 12:35:57 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:32:41 PM, YYW wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:22:45 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
Please tell me more about how nuts I am to think of dropping out and what a failure I'll become.

My scores:

Math: 730
Writing: Not sure yet as they have to grade my essay, but I definitely passed.
Science: 800 (Perfect, yay!)
Social Studies: 680
Reading: 690

How test scores work: http://www.gedtestingservice.com...

I now cannot be legally compelled to go back to public school even if my parents forced me. I am free.

If I go into higher education it'll definitely be in Israel as the universities here are sh*ttier than the public schools (plus with the welfare model it will cost a lot less, too). I've heard of people who went to a university in Israel and later went to M.I.T., and found that it was actually on a lower-level than their previous university (Bar-Ilan, I think). So it doesn't make a lot of sense to do it in this backwards country.

Any advice (note that this does not give anyone leave to rant or condescend me while feigning pure motives with their "advice")?

Congrats, kiddo!

Really though, the US has most of the best universities in the world.

Ya got proof?

Well we have 14 out of the top 25 which is pretty impressive.

http://www.usnews.com...
Cody_Franklin
Posts: 9,483
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6/18/2013 12:41:39 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/18/2013 12:35:32 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:32:39 PM, Cody_Franklin wrote:
I would recommend, if you are interested and could swing it, pairing philosophy or econ with something more concrete--perhaps a hard science, like physics or chemistry. If you want something that shares with philosophy a sort of rigorous, "pure-think" sort of discipline, you might also consider mathematics.

Well, I'm very ill-equipped to study hard sciences.

Everyone has to start somewhere. As long as you think well and have any [relevant] latent curiosity, I can't imagine you'd have too difficult a time.

How useful would mathematics be? I'm not interested in programming or engineering or anything like that, and I would assume economics teaches the necessary math in the course.

I'm talking about abstract mathematics. Programming and engineering are what we might call computational mathematics, which mostly consists in digging out, assembling, and filling in the proper formulas as decided according to specific practical problems. I'm talking about mathematics in the more arcane sense, which is what I suggest if you aren't so enthusiastic about the sciences. Its usefulness in terms of applicability is limited, since it's not mathematics appropriated for a specific use, but I've found it's incredibly useful for clarity of thought. Mathematics is one of those disciplines sharing in the rare advantage of having a fine lattice structure while actually corresponding in its results to conditions out in the world.
wrichcirw
Posts: 11,196
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6/18/2013 12:41:41 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/18/2013 12:32:39 PM, Cody_Franklin wrote:
I would recommend, if you are interested and could swing it, pairing philosophy or econ with something more concrete--perhaps a hard science, like physics or chemistry. If you want something that shares with philosophy a sort of rigorous, "pure-think" sort of discipline, you might also consider mathematics.
At 8/9/2013 9:41:24 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you are civil with me, I will be civil to you. If you decide to bring unreasonable animosity to bear in a reasonable discussion, then what would you expect other than to get flustered?
wrichcirw
Posts: 11,196
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6/18/2013 12:42:31 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/18/2013 12:35:32 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:32:39 PM, Cody_Franklin wrote:
I would recommend, if you are interested and could swing it, pairing philosophy or econ with something more concrete--perhaps a hard science, like physics or chemistry. If you want something that shares with philosophy a sort of rigorous, "pure-think" sort of discipline, you might also consider mathematics.

Well, I'm very ill-equipped to study hard sciences.

How useful would mathematics be? I'm not interested in programming or engineering or anything like that, and I would assume economics teaches the necessary math in the course.

Math is the gateway to higher education beyond a bachelors. If you're ill-equipped in this department, I'd spend as much effort as possible to make up for it.
At 8/9/2013 9:41:24 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you are civil with me, I will be civil to you. If you decide to bring unreasonable animosity to bear in a reasonable discussion, then what would you expect other than to get flustered?
wrichcirw
Posts: 11,196
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6/18/2013 12:43:29 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Also, economics without a strong foundation in mathematics is a joke.
At 8/9/2013 9:41:24 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you are civil with me, I will be civil to you. If you decide to bring unreasonable animosity to bear in a reasonable discussion, then what would you expect other than to get flustered?
YYW
Posts: 36,289
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6/18/2013 12:46:39 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/18/2013 12:35:57 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:32:41 PM, YYW wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:22:45 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
Please tell me more about how nuts I am to think of dropping out and what a failure I'll become.

My scores:

Math: 730
Writing: Not sure yet as they have to grade my essay, but I definitely passed.
Science: 800 (Perfect, yay!)
Social Studies: 680
Reading: 690

How test scores work: http://www.gedtestingservice.com...

I now cannot be legally compelled to go back to public school even if my parents forced me. I am free.

If I go into higher education it'll definitely be in Israel as the universities here are sh*ttier than the public schools (plus with the welfare model it will cost a lot less, too). I've heard of people who went to a university in Israel and later went to M.I.T., and found that it was actually on a lower-level than their previous university (Bar-Ilan, I think). So it doesn't make a lot of sense to do it in this backwards country.

Any advice (note that this does not give anyone leave to rant or condescend me while feigning pure motives with their "advice")?

Congrats, kiddo!

Really though, the US has most of the best universities in the world.

Ya got proof?

Count the number of universities in the United States, and compare that to every other country on the list:

http://www.usnews.com...
Tsar of DDO
Eitan_Zohar
Posts: 2,697
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6/18/2013 12:50:07 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/18/2013 12:41:39 PM, Cody_Franklin wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:35:32 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:32:39 PM, Cody_Franklin wrote:
I would recommend, if you are interested and could swing it, pairing philosophy or econ with something more concrete--perhaps a hard science, like physics or chemistry. If you want something that shares with philosophy a sort of rigorous, "pure-think" sort of discipline, you might also consider mathematics.

Well, I'm very ill-equipped to study hard sciences.

Everyone has to start somewhere. As long as you think well and have any [relevant] latent curiosity, I can't imagine you'd have too difficult a time.

How useful would mathematics be? I'm not interested in programming or engineering or anything like that, and I would assume economics teaches the necessary math in the course.

I'm talking about abstract mathematics. Programming and engineering are what we might call computational mathematics, which mostly consists in digging out, assembling, and filling in the proper formulas as decided according to specific practical problems. I'm talking about mathematics in the more arcane sense, which is what I suggest if you aren't so enthusiastic about the sciences. Its usefulness in terms of applicability is limited, since it's not mathematics appropriated for a specific use, but I've found it's incredibly useful for clarity of thought. Mathematics is one of those disciplines sharing in the rare advantage of having a fine lattice structure while actually corresponding in its results to conditions out in the world.

Well, (A) I want something that will put bread in my mouth, and (B) why must I formally study mathematics? Why can't I just study them on my own?
"It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book."
YYW
Posts: 36,289
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6/18/2013 12:50:50 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/18/2013 12:46:39 PM, YYW wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:35:57 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:32:41 PM, YYW wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:22:45 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
Please tell me more about how nuts I am to think of dropping out and what a failure I'll become.

My scores:

Math: 730
Writing: Not sure yet as they have to grade my essay, but I definitely passed.
Science: 800 (Perfect, yay!)
Social Studies: 680
Reading: 690

How test scores work: http://www.gedtestingservice.com...

I now cannot be legally compelled to go back to public school even if my parents forced me. I am free.

If I go into higher education it'll definitely be in Israel as the universities here are sh*ttier than the public schools (plus with the welfare model it will cost a lot less, too). I've heard of people who went to a university in Israel and later went to M.I.T., and found that it was actually on a lower-level than their previous university (Bar-Ilan, I think). So it doesn't make a lot of sense to do it in this backwards country.

Any advice (note that this does not give anyone leave to rant or condescend me while feigning pure motives with their "advice")?

Congrats, kiddo!

Really though, the US has most of the best universities in the world.

Ya got proof?

Count the number of universities in the United States, and compare that to every other country on the list:

http://www.usnews.com...

Although, in previous years more US institutions were higher on that list. On balance, the UK probably has the highest concentration of really exceptional universities, but there are more in the United States than any other country. Even still, I wouldn't suggest studying outside of the US at least for your first two years. Study abroad during one of those semesters and see how you like it before you make a more significant commitment.
Tsar of DDO
wrichcirw
Posts: 11,196
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6/18/2013 12:51:54 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Anyway, you're a smart kid, so I'm sure you'll figure out something that works for you. Good luck out there.
At 8/9/2013 9:41:24 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you are civil with me, I will be civil to you. If you decide to bring unreasonable animosity to bear in a reasonable discussion, then what would you expect other than to get flustered?
Eitan_Zohar
Posts: 2,697
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6/18/2013 12:55:23 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/18/2013 12:46:39 PM, YYW wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:35:57 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:32:41 PM, YYW wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:22:45 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
Please tell me more about how nuts I am to think of dropping out and what a failure I'll become.

My scores:

Math: 730
Writing: Not sure yet as they have to grade my essay, but I definitely passed.
Science: 800 (Perfect, yay!)
Social Studies: 680
Reading: 690

How test scores work: http://www.gedtestingservice.com...

I now cannot be legally compelled to go back to public school even if my parents forced me. I am free.

If I go into higher education it'll definitely be in Israel as the universities here are sh*ttier than the public schools (plus with the welfare model it will cost a lot less, too). I've heard of people who went to a university in Israel and later went to M.I.T., and found that it was actually on a lower-level than their previous university (Bar-Ilan, I think). So it doesn't make a lot of sense to do it in this backwards country.

Any advice (note that this does not give anyone leave to rant or condescend me while feigning pure motives with their "advice")?

Congrats, kiddo!

Really though, the US has most of the best universities in the world.

Ya got proof?

Count the number of universities in the United States, and compare that to every other country on the list:

http://www.usnews.com...

That seems to go by prestige rather than actual academic merit. I went to A-rated schools when I was younger and found them a joke.
"It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book."
Eitan_Zohar
Posts: 2,697
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6/18/2013 12:57:15 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/18/2013 12:50:50 PM, YYW wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:46:39 PM, YYW wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:35:57 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:32:41 PM, YYW wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:22:45 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
Please tell me more about how nuts I am to think of dropping out and what a failure I'll become.

My scores:

Math: 730
Writing: Not sure yet as they have to grade my essay, but I definitely passed.
Science: 800 (Perfect, yay!)
Social Studies: 680
Reading: 690

How test scores work: http://www.gedtestingservice.com...

I now cannot be legally compelled to go back to public school even if my parents forced me. I am free.

If I go into higher education it'll definitely be in Israel as the universities here are sh*ttier than the public schools (plus with the welfare model it will cost a lot less, too). I've heard of people who went to a university in Israel and later went to M.I.T., and found that it was actually on a lower-level than their previous university (Bar-Ilan, I think). So it doesn't make a lot of sense to do it in this backwards country.

Any advice (note that this does not give anyone leave to rant or condescend me while feigning pure motives with their "advice")?

Congrats, kiddo!

Really though, the US has most of the best universities in the world.

Ya got proof?

Count the number of universities in the United States, and compare that to every other country on the list:

http://www.usnews.com...

Although, in previous years more US institutions were higher on that list. On balance, the UK probably has the highest concentration of really exceptional universities, but there are more in the United States than any other country. Even still, I wouldn't suggest studying outside of the US at least for your first two years. Study abroad during one of those semesters and see how you like it before you make a more significant commitment.

I can live in Israel, can't I?
"It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book."
Cody_Franklin
Posts: 9,483
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6/18/2013 12:58:31 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/18/2013 12:50:07 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:41:39 PM, Cody_Franklin wrote:
I'm talking about abstract mathematics. Programming and engineering are what we might call computational mathematics, which mostly consists in digging out, assembling, and filling in the proper formulas as decided according to specific practical problems. I'm talking about mathematics in the more arcane sense, which is what I suggest if you aren't so enthusiastic about the sciences. Its usefulness in terms of applicability is limited, since it's not mathematics appropriated for a specific use, but I've found it's incredibly useful for clarity of thought. Mathematics is one of those disciplines sharing in the rare advantage of having a fine lattice structure while actually corresponding in its results to conditions out in the world.

Well, (A) I want something that will put bread in my mouth, and (B) why must I formally study mathematics? Why can't I just study them on my own?

Well, if you want something that keeps you fed, academic philosophy is in the first place probably not the wisest decision. In any case, a strong background in mathematics does not have direct uses in the same way that engineering, programming, etc. do, because it isn't a degree path designed to train you for a specific field. Someone with an advanced degree in chemical engineering, for instance, probably has no business being a risk actuary. This does not mean that math does not have applications: someone in mathematics probably has sufficient understanding that, seasoned with the right amount of training in a chosen, skill-intensive field, job opportunities are multiple.

Moreover, you're welcome to study math outside of a formal setting, but the same question could be asked of nearly any discipline--indeed, studying philosophy and economics outside of an academic setting is probably far easier than studying the more complicated parts of math without experienced professors. Perhaps you're actually a prodigious autodidact, and I am not aware of this fact, but I think you might make your judgment after reading through a few math journals to see what professional-level work looks like. If this is something you imagine you could both learn and execute independently, more power to you.
Cermank
Posts: 3,773
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6/18/2013 12:59:52 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Congratulations :) That's actually really great.

I think a combination of philosophy and economics would be really enriching, to tell you the truth. Applying economic principles and trying to come up with philosophical arguments for the intended effects would be an illuminating exercise. Plus, economics pays, so there's that.
YYW
Posts: 36,289
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6/18/2013 1:00:29 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/18/2013 12:57:15 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:50:50 PM, YYW wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:46:39 PM, YYW wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:35:57 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:32:41 PM, YYW wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:22:45 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
Please tell me more about how nuts I am to think of dropping out and what a failure I'll become.

My scores:

Math: 730
Writing: Not sure yet as they have to grade my essay, but I definitely passed.
Science: 800 (Perfect, yay!)
Social Studies: 680
Reading: 690

How test scores work: http://www.gedtestingservice.com...

I now cannot be legally compelled to go back to public school even if my parents forced me. I am free.

If I go into higher education it'll definitely be in Israel as the universities here are sh*ttier than the public schools (plus with the welfare model it will cost a lot less, too). I've heard of people who went to a university in Israel and later went to M.I.T., and found that it was actually on a lower-level than their previous university (Bar-Ilan, I think). So it doesn't make a lot of sense to do it in this backwards country.

Any advice (note that this does not give anyone leave to rant or condescend me while feigning pure motives with their "advice")?

Congrats, kiddo!

Really though, the US has most of the best universities in the world.

Ya got proof?

Count the number of universities in the United States, and compare that to every other country on the list:

http://www.usnews.com...

Although, in previous years more US institutions were higher on that list. On balance, the UK probably has the highest concentration of really exceptional universities, but there are more in the United States than any other country. Even still, I wouldn't suggest studying outside of the US at least for your first two years. Study abroad during one of those semesters and see how you like it before you make a more significant commitment.

I can live in Israel, can't I?

I thought you lived in Georgia... lol... if you've lived abroad before, then that's one thing if you're returning to a country you're already familiar with. I didn't realize that you had, though.
Tsar of DDO
YYW
Posts: 36,289
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6/18/2013 1:01:17 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/18/2013 12:55:23 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:46:39 PM, YYW wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:35:57 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:32:41 PM, YYW wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:22:45 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
Please tell me more about how nuts I am to think of dropping out and what a failure I'll become.

My scores:

Math: 730
Writing: Not sure yet as they have to grade my essay, but I definitely passed.
Science: 800 (Perfect, yay!)
Social Studies: 680
Reading: 690

How test scores work: http://www.gedtestingservice.com...

I now cannot be legally compelled to go back to public school even if my parents forced me. I am free.

If I go into higher education it'll definitely be in Israel as the universities here are sh*ttier than the public schools (plus with the welfare model it will cost a lot less, too). I've heard of people who went to a university in Israel and later went to M.I.T., and found that it was actually on a lower-level than their previous university (Bar-Ilan, I think). So it doesn't make a lot of sense to do it in this backwards country.

Any advice (note that this does not give anyone leave to rant or condescend me while feigning pure motives with their "advice")?

Congrats, kiddo!

Really though, the US has most of the best universities in the world.

Ya got proof?

Count the number of universities in the United States, and compare that to every other country on the list:

http://www.usnews.com...

That seems to go by prestige rather than actual academic merit. I went to A-rated schools when I was younger and found them a joke.

That doesn't mean that US News's methodology is flawed ;)
Tsar of DDO
F-16_Fighting_Falcon
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6/18/2013 1:02:53 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Good job. I am sure you'll do well wherever you study. I still don't think you should discount US universities. If you plan to work in the US, a degree from a US university will look better on your resume as well.
Eitan_Zohar
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6/18/2013 1:07:52 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/18/2013 12:58:31 PM, Cody_Franklin wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:50:07 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 6/18/2013 12:41:39 PM, Cody_Franklin wrote:
I'm talking about abstract mathematics. Programming and engineering are what we might call computational mathematics, which mostly consists in digging out, assembling, and filling in the proper formulas as decided according to specific practical problems. I'm talking about mathematics in the more arcane sense, which is what I suggest if you aren't so enthusiastic about the sciences. Its usefulness in terms of applicability is limited, since it's not mathematics appropriated for a specific use, but I've found it's incredibly useful for clarity of thought. Mathematics is one of those disciplines sharing in the rare advantage of having a fine lattice structure while actually corresponding in its results to conditions out in the world.

Well, (A) I want something that will put bread in my mouth, and (B) why must I formally study mathematics? Why can't I just study them on my own?

Well, if you want something that keeps you fed, academic philosophy is in the first place probably not the wisest decision. In any case, a strong background in mathematics does not have direct uses in the same way that engineering, programming, etc. do, because it isn't a degree path designed to train you for a specific field. Someone with an advanced degree in chemical engineering, for instance, probably has no business being a risk actuary. This does not mean that math does not have applications: someone in mathematics probably has sufficient understanding that, seasoned with the right amount of training in a chosen, skill-intensive field, job opportunities are multiple.

Moreover, you're welcome to study math outside of a formal setting, but the same question could be asked of nearly any discipline--indeed, studying philosophy and economics outside of an academic setting is probably far easier than studying the more complicated parts of math without experienced professors. Perhaps you're actually a prodigious autodidact, and I am not aware of this fact, but I think you might make your judgment after reading through a few math journals to see what professional-level work looks like. If this is something you imagine you could both learn and execute independently, more power to you.

I might not major in philosophy. I'd like to combine philosophy with something that can make money.

Give me a list of the usefulness of degrees in order (Google keeps being a b*tch) and let's see how high mathematics ranks.
"It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book."
Eitan_Zohar
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6/18/2013 1:10:12 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 6/18/2013 12:59:52 PM, Cermank wrote:
Congratulations :) That's actually really great.

I think a combination of philosophy and economics would be really enriching, to tell you the truth. Applying economic principles and trying to come up with philosophical arguments for the intended effects would be an illuminating exercise. Plus, economics pays, so there's that.

Yeah, that's actually why I suggested it.
"It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book."