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Nightmares

Andromeda_Z
Posts: 4,151
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7/5/2013 10:29:42 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I'm having nightmares, almost every night lately. They're of memories from the past, not really going to go into detail there. It's quite personal, and they're memories I'd rather not have, much less share. My boyfriend has to wake me up so I can get out of the nightmares and calm down, so it's starting to mess with both of us. Is there any way to make them stop? I've had them for years, but for a while they had mostly gone away. It's just recently that they're coming back.
YYW
Posts: 36,286
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7/5/2013 10:31:25 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/5/2013 10:29:42 PM, Andromeda_Z wrote:
I'm having nightmares, almost every night lately. They're of memories from the past, not really going to go into detail there. It's quite personal, and they're memories I'd rather not have, much less share. My boyfriend has to wake me up so I can get out of the nightmares and calm down, so it's starting to mess with both of us. Is there any way to make them stop? I've had them for years, but for a while they had mostly gone away. It's just recently that they're coming back.

Questions:

Do you eat, drink or smoke before you go to sleep?
Tsar of DDO
Andromeda_Z
Posts: 4,151
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7/5/2013 10:34:41 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/5/2013 10:31:25 PM, YYW wrote:
At 7/5/2013 10:29:42 PM, Andromeda_Z wrote:
I'm having nightmares, almost every night lately. They're of memories from the past, not really going to go into detail there. It's quite personal, and they're memories I'd rather not have, much less share. My boyfriend has to wake me up so I can get out of the nightmares and calm down, so it's starting to mess with both of us. Is there any way to make them stop? I've had them for years, but for a while they had mostly gone away. It's just recently that they're coming back.

Questions:

Do you eat, drink or smoke before you go to sleep?

I don't smoke. As far as eating and drinking, I typically do that a few hours before bed. I don't wait until I'm hungry to go to sleep, but I don't fall asleep while eating either.
YYW
Posts: 36,286
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7/5/2013 10:43:20 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/5/2013 10:34:41 PM, Andromeda_Z wrote:
At 7/5/2013 10:31:25 PM, YYW wrote:
At 7/5/2013 10:29:42 PM, Andromeda_Z wrote:
I'm having nightmares, almost every night lately. They're of memories from the past, not really going to go into detail there. It's quite personal, and they're memories I'd rather not have, much less share. My boyfriend has to wake me up so I can get out of the nightmares and calm down, so it's starting to mess with both of us. Is there any way to make them stop? I've had them for years, but for a while they had mostly gone away. It's just recently that they're coming back.

Questions:

Do you eat, drink or smoke before you go to sleep?

I don't smoke. As far as eating and drinking, I typically do that a few hours before bed. I don't wait until I'm hungry to go to sleep, but I don't fall asleep while eating either.

Ok. Those are the most common causes of nightmares, and they're the easiest to fix... which is why I asked.

I'm not going to ask any more personal questions because of privacy concerns, but generally speaking there are a number of reasons why adults have nightmares. Many medications (especially antidepressants) can cause nightmares, as well as narcotics and some sleep aids (both OTC and Rx). A lack of healthy sleep patterns can also increase the possibility of nightmares occurring. PTSD and general anxiety can also significantly increase the likelihood of nightmares as well.

For example, before I got the prescription sleep aid I have now, I would take OTC sleep aids (most of which were worthless) and valerian root as well as melatonin would especially cause problems. There are, for example, behavioral changes that can have a positive impact on nightmare (like meditation, exercise or other stress relieving activity) but results may vary -especially if there is an underlying problem that nightmares are the result of.

If they go on for an extended period of time, it would be wise to talk to your general practitioner -who can I'm sure give you better advice than I.
Tsar of DDO
Andromeda_Z
Posts: 4,151
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7/5/2013 11:08:09 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/5/2013 10:43:20 PM, YYW wrote:
Ok. Those are the most common causes of nightmares, and they're the easiest to fix... which is why I asked.

I'm not going to ask any more personal questions because of privacy concerns

Thanks. If you think it would be useful, I can tell you through PM or something, but really, it's just that I don't like these memories enough to go back and tell the story.
, but generally speaking there are a number of reasons why adults have nightmares. Many medications (especially antidepressants) can cause nightmares, as well as narcotics and some sleep aids (both OTC and Rx). A lack of healthy sleep patterns can also increase the possibility of nightmares occurring. PTSD and general anxiety can also significantly increase the likelihood of nightmares as well.

I'm not on medications, and I do my best to have a healthy sleep pattern (it's actually gotten better recently). From my understanding, I have a lot of PTSD symptoms, but I'm obviously not a psychologist. Maybe that's the cause here.

For example, before I got the prescription sleep aid I have now, I would take OTC sleep aids (most of which were worthless) and valerian root as well as melatonin would especially cause problems. There are, for example, behavioral changes that can have a positive impact on nightmare (like meditation, exercise or other stress relieving activity) but results may vary -especially if there is an underlying problem that nightmares are the result of.

If they go on for an extended period of time, it would be wise to talk to your general practitioner -who can I'm sure give you better advice than I.

This was really helpful, but maybe it would be best to talk to a doctor when I can. A doctor's job is to fix people.
YYW
Posts: 36,286
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7/5/2013 11:16:16 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/5/2013 11:08:09 PM, Andromeda_Z wrote:
At 7/5/2013 10:43:20 PM, YYW wrote:
Ok. Those are the most common causes of nightmares, and they're the easiest to fix... which is why I asked.

I'm not going to ask any more personal questions because of privacy concerns

Thanks. If you think it would be useful, I can tell you through PM or something, but really, it's just that I don't like these memories enough to go back and tell the story.
, but generally speaking there are a number of reasons why adults have nightmares. Many medications (especially antidepressants) can cause nightmares, as well as narcotics and some sleep aids (both OTC and Rx). A lack of healthy sleep patterns can also increase the possibility of nightmares occurring. PTSD and general anxiety can also significantly increase the likelihood of nightmares as well.

I'm not on medications, and I do my best to have a healthy sleep pattern (it's actually gotten better recently). From my understanding, I have a lot of PTSD symptoms, but I'm obviously not a psychologist. Maybe that's the cause here.

For example, before I got the prescription sleep aid I have now, I would take OTC sleep aids (most of which were worthless) and valerian root as well as melatonin would especially cause problems. There are, for example, behavioral changes that can have a positive impact on nightmare (like meditation, exercise or other stress relieving activity) but results may vary -especially if there is an underlying problem that nightmares are the result of.

If they go on for an extended period of time, it would be wise to talk to your general practitioner -who can I'm sure give you better advice than I.

This was really helpful, but maybe it would be best to talk to a doctor when I can. A doctor's job is to fix people.

I'd be happy to listen, but telling me what's going on probably wouldn't be very productive. I'm not a medical doctor or a licensed psychologist... I just know a little bit about this because I used to have them too, but for different reasons I think. I also think that it's probably best to talk to a GP. S/he will rule out physiological causes, and if necessary refer you to a counselor of psychologist to address any potential PTSD complications.
Tsar of DDO