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Bruce Lee's Philosophy

R0b1Billion
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7/20/2013 9:48:44 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
"It's not the daily increase but daily decrease. Hack away at the unessential." - Bruce Lee

This quote has been especially poignant to me lately. I have observed that, generally speaking, society believes precisely the opposite - it's the daily increase that we strive for. More pay; more technology; more stuff in general. "More" is the American dream, and we are all chasing it without much thought as to why, simply because of the allure and prestige that more provides.

I deleted my Facebook page last year, ditched my cellphone a few months later, and have been looking for more ways to, as Lee puts it, "hack away at the unessential." Two months ago I quit smoking weed, and 22 days ago I stopped consuming anything with sugar in it (fresh fruit is OK, but no artificial sweeteners). Someday I'd like to quit driving as well, although logistically I can't figure that out at the moment. Vegetarianism is another idea that I'm not yet able to achieve but am looking forward to someday, and alcohol would be nice to eliminate once I get into a relationship (being single is just too fun a time to drink). As time passes, I hope to increase my achievement of eliminating the unnecessary fat in my life both by finding new ways to do it and having the strength and dedication to see it through.

Do you agree or disagree with Lee's philosophy and my interpretation of it? Do you take strength in things you can eliminate from your life that you see others indulging in? What do you take pride in not doing that you find others indulging in? Conversely, would you care to defend the proposition that indulging oneself, accumulating material goods (of the luxurious kind as opposed to the productive kind) and streamlining your life with technological gadgetry is a good idea?
Beliefs in a nutshell:
- The Ends never justify the Means.
- Objectivity is secondary to subjectivity.
- The War on Drugs is the worst policy in the U.S.
- Most people worship technology as a religion.
- Computers will never become sentient.
Mirza
Posts: 16,992
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7/20/2013 10:18:45 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
The philosophy is good if it makes you happy. I don't indulge in several things that other people do. I don't care about them, and I feel good about it. Good for me.
thett3
Posts: 14,371
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7/20/2013 10:21:30 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I have never heard that quote before, but I like it a lot. Usually t really is the simple things that bring us the most joy. Other things just get in the way
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Buddamoose
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7/20/2013 11:04:46 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I saw Bruce Lee tonight, he lives!

Was racing at the Jefferson Speedway
"Reality is an illusion created due to a lack of alcohol"
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Mirza
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7/20/2013 11:11:07 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/20/2013 11:04:46 PM, Buddamoose wrote:
I saw Bruce Lee tonight, he lives!

Was racing at the Jefferson Speedway
I read a report today that Bruce Lee is spotted 1.2 billion times every day in China. Coincidentally, that's the amount of people living there.
DetectableNinja
Posts: 6,043
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7/21/2013 12:02:57 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
Bruce Lee is not my kind of guy. Do the Right Thing was great, but personally he's not a very good person in my book.
Think'st thou heaven is such a glorious thing?
I tell thee, 'tis not half so fair as thou
Or any man that breathes on earth.

- Christopher Marlowe, Doctor Faustus
000ike
Posts: 11,196
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7/21/2013 12:16:08 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/20/2013 9:48:44 PM, R0b1Billion wrote:
"It's not the daily increase but daily decrease. Hack away at the unessential." - Bruce Lee

This quote has been especially poignant to me lately. I have observed that, generally speaking, society believes precisely the opposite - it's the daily increase that we strive for. More pay; more technology; more stuff in general. "More" is the American dream, and we are all chasing it without much thought as to why, simply because of the allure and prestige that more provides.

I deleted my Facebook page last year, ditched my cellphone a few months later, and have been looking for more ways to, as Lee puts it, "hack away at the unessential." Two months ago I quit smoking weed, and 22 days ago I stopped consuming anything with sugar in it (fresh fruit is OK, but no artificial sweeteners). Someday I'd like to quit driving as well, although logistically I can't figure that out at the moment. Vegetarianism is another idea that I'm not yet able to achieve but am looking forward to someday, and alcohol would be nice to eliminate once I get into a relationship (being single is just too fun a time to drink). As time passes, I hope to increase my achievement of eliminating the unnecessary fat in my life both by finding new ways to do it and having the strength and dedication to see it through.

Do you agree or disagree with Lee's philosophy and my interpretation of it? Do you take strength in things you can eliminate from your life that you see others indulging in? What do you take pride in not doing that you find others indulging in? Conversely, would you care to defend the proposition that indulging oneself, accumulating material goods (of the luxurious kind as opposed to the productive kind) and streamlining your life with technological gadgetry is a good idea?

Whatever makes you happy, really. I just don't see any legitimacy in that kind of thinking. We pursue happiness whatever form that pursuit takes. Asceticism is not not some magic key to bypassing the process of that pursuit. If it makes you happy, you live that way. If it doesn't, you dump it.
"A stupid despot may constrain his slaves with iron chains; but a true politician binds them even more strongly with the chain of their own ideas" - Michel Foucault
R0b1Billion
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7/21/2013 8:58:30 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/20/2013 10:18:45 PM, Mirza wrote:
The philosophy is good if it makes you happy. I don't indulge in several things that other people do. I don't care about them, and I feel good about it. Good for me.

Like what?

At 7/20/2013 10:21:30 PM, thett3 wrote:
I have never heard that quote before, but I like it a lot. Usually t really is the simple things that bring us the most joy. Other things just get in the way

Definitely. Our culture, however, highly promotes the "other things" and I think that confuses us greatly. Trying to combat that trend is difficult. People will cling helplessly to their indulgences...

Whatever makes you happy, really. I just don't see any legitimacy in that kind of thinking. We pursue happiness whatever form that pursuit takes. Asceticism is not not some magic key to bypassing the process of that pursuit. If it makes you happy, you live that way. If it doesn't, you dump it.

You seek to compartmentalize my beliefs through jargon - asceticism. I don't renounce all worldly pleasures, I am simply seeking to figure out, exactly, which ones really make us happy and which ones actually make us less happy. We are too quick to assume that more is better!
Beliefs in a nutshell:
- The Ends never justify the Means.
- Objectivity is secondary to subjectivity.
- The War on Drugs is the worst policy in the U.S.
- Most people worship technology as a religion.
- Computers will never become sentient.
Mirza
Posts: 16,992
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7/21/2013 2:49:59 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/21/2013 8:58:30 AM, R0b1Billion wrote:
At 7/20/2013 10:18:45 PM, Mirza wrote:
The philosophy is good if it makes you happy. I don't indulge in several things that other people do. I don't care about them, and I feel good about it. Good for me.

Like what?
Avoidance of any intoxicants (alcohol, drugs), smoking, sex, fancy parties and fashion clothes, newest gags, to name a few. None of this is in my interests, but highly popular among my peers.
R0b1Billion
Posts: 3,733
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7/21/2013 6:54:18 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/21/2013 2:49:59 PM, Mirza wrote:
At 7/21/2013 8:58:30 AM, R0b1Billion wrote:
At 7/20/2013 10:18:45 PM, Mirza wrote:
The philosophy is good if it makes you happy. I don't indulge in several things that other people do. I don't care about them, and I feel good about it. Good for me.

Like what?
Avoidance of any intoxicants (alcohol, drugs), smoking, sex, fancy parties and fashion clothes, newest gags, to name a few. None of this is in my interests, but highly popular among my peers.

Is not going to parties just a subjective personal preference that has no real sense to it? Or would the world be a better place if more people were like you?
Beliefs in a nutshell:
- The Ends never justify the Means.
- Objectivity is secondary to subjectivity.
- The War on Drugs is the worst policy in the U.S.
- Most people worship technology as a religion.
- Computers will never become sentient.
Mirza
Posts: 16,992
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7/21/2013 10:42:40 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/21/2013 6:54:18 PM, R0b1Billion wrote:
Is not going to parties just a subjective personal preference that has no real sense to it? Or would the world be a better place if more people were like you?
There's sense to it. I think many people would benefit from following my pattern, but everyone is an individual.
vbaculum
Posts: 1,274
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7/21/2013 11:19:40 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/20/2013 9:48:44 PM, R0b1Billion wrote:
"It's not the daily increase but daily decrease. Hack away at the unessential." - Bruce Lee

This quote has been especially poignant to me lately. I have observed that, generally speaking, society believes precisely the opposite - it's the daily increase that we strive for. More pay; more technology; more stuff in general. "More" is the American dream, and we are all chasing it without much thought as to why, simply because of the allure and prestige that more provides.

I deleted my Facebook page last year, ditched my cellphone a few months later, and have been looking for more ways to, as Lee puts it, "hack away at the unessential." Two months ago I quit smoking weed, and 22 days ago I stopped consuming anything with sugar in it (fresh fruit is OK, but no artificial sweeteners). Someday I'd like to quit driving as well, although logistically I can't figure that out at the moment. Vegetarianism is another idea that I'm not yet able to achieve but am looking forward to someday, and alcohol would be nice to eliminate once I get into a relationship (being single is just too fun a time to drink). As time passes, I hope to increase my achievement of eliminating the unnecessary fat in my life both by finding new ways to do it and having the strength and dedication to see it through.

Do you agree or disagree with Lee's philosophy and my interpretation of it? Do you take strength in things you can eliminate from your life that you see others indulging in? What do you take pride in not doing that you find others indulging in? Conversely, would you care to defend the proposition that indulging oneself, accumulating material goods (of the luxurious kind as opposed to the productive kind) and streamlining your life with technological gadgetry is a good idea?

I think most non-essential externalities have no effect on happiness in the long run. In "The Happiness Hypothesis", Haidt points to a study that showed wealthy people to be no happier than poor people - actually the poor people were happier because they spent more time with their family and friends, as I remember.

I think Buddhist monks have a strong case when they argue that it's better to free yourself from attachments than to seek new ones. Happiness and unhappiness are just carrots and sticks that nature uses to cause you to reproduce. No matter what you do, you will always have a carrot in front of you and a stick behind you.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

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FREEDO
Posts: 21,057
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7/22/2013 12:45:01 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
To an extent. I wouldn't take it as far as it goes. A middle-path. Which is not to say I stick to a middle path. Sometimes excess is necessary. And sometimes fasting is necessary. But whatever you do, don't get too caught up in it to change. Sometimes you should change just to remind yourself what it's like.
GRAND POOBAH OF DDO

fnord
FREEDO
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7/22/2013 12:45:01 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
To an extent. I wouldn't take it as far as it goes. A middle-path. Which is not to say I stick to a middle path. Sometimes excess is necessary. And sometimes fasting is necessary. But whatever you do, don't get too caught up in it to change. Sometimes you should change just to remind yourself what it's like.
GRAND POOBAH OF DDO

fnord
R0b1Billion
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7/23/2013 10:50:24 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/21/2013 11:19:40 PM, vbaculum wrote:
At 7/20/2013 9:48:44 PM, R0b1Billion wrote:
"It's not the daily increase but daily decrease. Hack away at the unessential." - Bruce Lee

This quote has been especially poignant to me lately. I have observed that, generally speaking, society believes precisely the opposite - it's the daily increase that we strive for. More pay; more technology; more stuff in general. "More" is the American dream, and we are all chasing it without much thought as to why, simply because of the allure and prestige that more provides.

I deleted my Facebook page last year, ditched my cellphone a few months later, and have been looking for more ways to, as Lee puts it, "hack away at the unessential." Two months ago I quit smoking weed, and 22 days ago I stopped consuming anything with sugar in it (fresh fruit is OK, but no artificial sweeteners). Someday I'd like to quit driving as well, although logistically I can't figure that out at the moment. Vegetarianism is another idea that I'm not yet able to achieve but am looking forward to someday, and alcohol would be nice to eliminate once I get into a relationship (being single is just too fun a time to drink). As time passes, I hope to increase my achievement of eliminating the unnecessary fat in my life both by finding new ways to do it and having the strength and dedication to see it through.

Do you agree or disagree with Lee's philosophy and my interpretation of it? Do you take strength in things you can eliminate from your life that you see others indulging in? What do you take pride in not doing that you find others indulging in? Conversely, would you care to defend the proposition that indulging oneself, accumulating material goods (of the luxurious kind as opposed to the productive kind) and streamlining your life with technological gadgetry is a good idea?

I think most non-essential externalities have no effect on happiness in the long run. In "The Happiness Hypothesis", Haidt points to a study that showed wealthy people to be no happier than poor people - actually the poor people were happier because they spent more time with their family and friends, as I remember.

I think Buddhist monks have a strong case when they argue that it's better to free yourself from attachments than to seek new ones. Happiness and unhappiness are just carrots and sticks that nature uses to cause you to reproduce. No matter what you do, you will always have a carrot in front of you and a stick behind you.

And you seem to make my point for me... so if being wealthy and having a bunch of material goods and services at your disposal does not truly make you happier, then logically it would make no sense to seek out luxuries because not only do they not really work, but they cause extra strife that you don't need. Luxuries necessarily require you to justify your greed as well as make you weaker as you become not only harder to sate (in terms of pleasure) but also softer.
Beliefs in a nutshell:
- The Ends never justify the Means.
- Objectivity is secondary to subjectivity.
- The War on Drugs is the worst policy in the U.S.
- Most people worship technology as a religion.
- Computers will never become sentient.