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Protesting school

TemperedEmpire
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7/23/2013 2:54:57 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
I hate school, it is the basis for my suffering everyday of everyone since I started attending. Being in grade 10 now, I have experienced little in the way of freedom from the adults at in institute. One of the big harps I have against it is the lack of freedom of speech (something I believe everyone loves) and the fact that in Australia, almost no schools allow free dress.

So, since I got my act together not to long ago and became a liberal, I've had this idea in my head that goes along the lines of protesting the schooling system; a hunger strike, a walk out, anything to topple the tyrannical system. I wish to start one, but because I've been brainwashed by essentially all society, I can't bring myself to do it.

So, instead, I have come onto website full of people I don't know to ask for advice; should I risk my future education (university) to strike and protest an unjust system? Or am I just a whiny student that no one takes seriously?
the_croftmeister
Posts: 678
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7/23/2013 3:30:10 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/23/2013 2:54:57 AM, TemperedEmpire wrote:
I hate school, it is the basis for my suffering everyday of everyone since I started attending. Being in grade 10 now, I have experienced little in the way of freedom from the adults at in institute. One of the big harps I have against it is the lack of freedom of speech (something I believe everyone loves) and the fact that in Australia, almost no schools allow free dress.
I admire your convictions, it is always good to have diversity of opinion on any topic (including the way the school system is run). I have to ask you, what level of free speech would you like to see in school? How far would you take it? In public, free speech is limited by laws against slander (to take one example), would you propose that school should have the same standards of free speech as anywhere else? Do you think all students are capable of using their freedom of speech responsibly? Or is this not a concern for you (many liberals treat freedoms as absolute in all cases, I was just wondering how far you take it).

So, since I got my act together not to long ago and became a liberal, I've had this idea in my head that goes along the lines of protesting the schooling system; a hunger strike, a walk out, anything to topple the tyrannical system. I wish to start one, but because I've been brainwashed by essentially all society, I can't bring myself to do it.
Have you given any thought to what you would replace the 'tyrannical system' with? Do you think that these ideas are likely to succeed? Could there perhaps be a better way to achieve the changes you want? What do you see as being the purpose of education? Do you believe those purposes can still be achieved without the 'tyrannical' components of the school system? I personally think for public schools at least uniforms are unnecessary, but at the end of the day are they really that much of an inconvenience?

So, instead, I have come onto website full of people I don't know to ask for advice; should I risk my future education (university) to strike and protest an unjust system? Or am I just a whiny student that no one takes seriously?
Perhaps there are other ways you can protest without striking? Schools deal with absenteeism all the time. Perhaps you could start a group at school which discusses these issues and attempts to come up with positive changes that could contribute to resolving your concerns. I don't think you are 'just a whiny student' but if you stage a strike then it is entirely possible that people will dismiss you as a lazy kid that doesn't want to go to school and do some work.

Final question, what is it precisely that you believe you have been 'brainwashed by the entire society' to believe?
TemperedEmpire
Posts: 15
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7/23/2013 3:56:49 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/23/2013 3:30:10 AM, the_croftmeister wrote:
I admire your convictions, it is always good to have diversity of opinion on any topic (including the way the school system is run). I have to ask you, what level of free speech would you like to see in school? How far would you take it? In public, free speech is limited by laws against slander (to take one example), would you propose that school should have the same standards of free speech as anywhere else? Do you think all students are capable of using their freedom of speech responsibly? Or is this not a concern for you (many liberals treat freedoms as absolute in all cases, I was just wondering how far you take it).:
Well, you really can't talk out against teachers, other students, the country itself, government officials (sometimes) and parents, just to name a few. I really don't care how far they talk out, it is not my, nor the schools concern. Even if I didn't care about what they had to say, if would make me extremely hypocritical to not allow them to speak their mind. The school uniform comes under this freedom-of-speech category as well; students, such as myself would like to express ourselves in our own ways without being forced into wearing a costume that removes a lot of aspects of what we are as individuals. It is really understandable for their perspective, but I truly wish we could actually talk about these things without the principal knocking on our door every time we don't wear the right clothes, or say "the right things".

Have you given any thought to what you would replace the 'tyrannical system' with? Do you think that these ideas are likely to succeed? Could there perhaps be a better way to achieve the changes you want? What do you see as being the purpose of education? Do you believe those purposes can still be achieved without the 'tyrannical' components of the school system? I personally think for public schools at least uniforms are unnecessary, but at the end of the day are they really that much of an inconvenience?:
I see school as being tyrannical because it seems very archaic, and incredibly ageist. I love education, but I do wish that teens like myself could receive a little more freedom to as we please, and by that I mean destroying compulsory schooling. However, all of this seems to boil down to who should get certain freedoms at certain times, and I believe teenagers are mature enough (to a point) for them to not be looked over everyday by parents and the schooling system. In saying that, I am not against school as an educational tool, and I would like everyone to go it if it maximises the learning experience, but I wouldn't want to take away their freedom in doing so.

Final question, what is it precisely that you believe you have been 'brainwashed by the entire society' to believe?:
What I meant in saying that was that I can't seem to get out of this zone of "adult control". I always feel compelled, by what seems like an unknown force, to listen to what adults have to say and always take orders. If I could somehow get around that, I could be more compelled to stand up to the system they have put in place.
the_croftmeister
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7/23/2013 5:18:37 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/23/2013 3:56:49 AM, TemperedEmpire wrote:
At 7/23/2013 3:30:10 AM, the_croftmeister wrote:
I admire your convictions, it is always good to have diversity of opinion on any topic (including the way the school system is run). I have to ask you, what level of free speech would you like to see in school? How far would you take it? In public, free speech is limited by laws against slander (to take one example), would you propose that school should have the same standards of free speech as anywhere else? Do you think all students are capable of using their freedom of speech responsibly? Or is this not a concern for you (many liberals treat freedoms as absolute in all cases, I was just wondering how far you take it).:
Well, you really can't talk out against teachers, other students, the country itself, government officials (sometimes) and parents, just to name a few.
Well what do you mean by talk out? Do you mean you want to be able to insult a teacher? Or just to be able to disagree with them. Also, are you referring to speech in the classroom or in the school in general? It wasn't that long ago that I was at school and I never felt that I couldn't ask questions or present facts that didn't necessarily follow the 'official line'. Perhaps your school is different. Even as an adult you can't just go around saying whatever you like about other people and expect that they will be happy about it. This is a social convention (which is part of what school is supposed to teach) to help people get along. Freedom of speech is a legal right, and the government can't suppress it. Perhaps you think adults shouldn't suppress each other through social pressure either and that's a fair criticism, I guess I'll have to see how you plan to stop people getting upset by random outbursts of criticism.
I really don't care how far they talk out, it is not my, nor the schools concern. Even if I didn't care about what they had to say, if would make me extremely hypocritical to not allow them to speak their mind.
There is a difference between allowing someone to speak their mind and insisting they do it at the proper time and in the proper manner. This is a pragmatic concern, respectful language enables us to tell the difference between when someone is being deliberately offensive and when they are just expressing an opinion. And surely you recognise that there has to be a time and a place for such things if the school is to achieve the educational objectives it aspires to. Do you know what a filibuster is? This is what happens when you allow unrestricted speech.

The school uniform comes under this freedom-of-speech category as well; students, such as myself would like to express ourselves in our own ways without being forced into wearing a costume that removes a lot of aspects of what we are as individuals. It is really understandable for their perspective, but I truly wish we could actually talk about these things without the principal knocking on our door every time we don't wear the right clothes, or say "the right things".
Well technically a uniform is a 'freedom of expression' right as opposed to freedom of speech which is a strictly narrower right but I take your point. If you feel it removes your individuality then I can understand that, I never felt that way about my uniform but these kinds of feelings are of course subjective. I do think that some teachers put unreasonable limits on what students can say and do, but I don't think it's the 'system' that causes it.

Have you given any thought to what you would replace the 'tyrannical system' with? Do you think that these ideas are likely to succeed? Could there perhaps be a better way to achieve the changes you want? What do you see as being the purpose of education? Do you believe those purposes can still be achieved without the 'tyrannical' components of the school system? I personally think for public schools at least uniforms are unnecessary, but at the end of the day are they really that much of an inconvenience?:
I see school as being tyrannical because it seems very archaic, and incredibly ageist. I love education, but I do wish that teens like myself could receive a little more freedom to as we please, and by that I mean destroying compulsory schooling.
So when are you suggesting compulsory schooling should end?

However, all of this seems to boil down to who should get certain freedoms at certain times, and I believe teenagers are mature enough (to a point) for them to not be looked over everyday by parents and the schooling system. In saying that, I am not against school as an educational tool, and I would like everyone to go it if it maximises the learning experience, but I wouldn't want to take away their freedom in doing so.
You can't have school and not taking away some freedoms (this is my opinion, perhaps you have another), perhaps you think too many are currently and I would definitely advise you to keep thinking and discussing which freedoms can afford to be compromised and which can't.

Final question, what is it precisely that you believe you have been 'brainwashed by the entire society' to believe?:
What I meant in saying that was that I can't seem to get out of this zone of "adult control". I always feel compelled, by what seems like an unknown force, to listen to what adults have to say and always take orders. If I could somehow get around that, I could be more compelled to stand up to the system they have put in place.
I hope you don't think that magically changes when you become an adult. Most human beings feel a desire to obey orders whether they are children or adults. There will almost always be people in a position of authority over you and if there aren't people putting restrictions on you, the environment will do it for them (there are physical restrictions on us that are a result of the way the world is).
TemperedEmpire
Posts: 15
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7/23/2013 6:09:22 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/23/2013 3:30:10 AM, the_croftmeister wrote:
There is a difference between allowing someone to speak their mind and insisting they do it at the proper time and in the proper manner. This is a pragmatic concern, respectful language enables us to tell the difference between when someone is being deliberately offensive and when they are just expressing an opinion. And surely you recognise that there has to be a time and a place for such things if the school is to achieve the educational objectives it aspires to. Do you know what a filibuster is? This is what happens when you allow unrestricted speech.:
I really don't agree with this "time and a place" argument; for me, you should be allowed to speak the most hateful things imaginable. I may not like it (in fact I often do dislike hate speech), the school my not like it, and many other people may not like it, but I wish freedom of speech to extend as far as possible. What type of offensive speech blocks the pathway to the "educational objectives" of the school, in your opinion?

You can't have school and not taking away some freedoms (this is my opinion, perhaps you have another), perhaps you think too many are currently and I would definitely advise you to keep thinking and discussing which freedoms can afford to be compromised and which can't.:
I think the schooling system would be better if
1. They allowed free dress; at my school, almost every student I come across seems to dislike the uniform system, and the fact that they naturally obscure freedom of expression makes it even more horrendous.

2. What school non-compulsory; I do not agree with compulsory schooling, I have already explained that. But to answer your question "when should compulsory schooling end?", I would have to answer right away. It may pain me to say this, but I would much prefer a free society over one that had 100% education, even though free and educated can often be considered synonyms today. Also (as much as I hate social Darwinism) it could compel those people who truly want to go and further their education after primary school to go to high school. I believe (and there will be differing thoughts on this) that (if high school was compulsory) students in primary school should be advertised the benefits of further education. If you sell high school off as something that truly furthers you in life, it probably would compel them to go on and join.

I hope you don't think that magically changes when you become an adult. Most human beings feel a desire to obey orders whether they are children or adults. There will almost always be people in a position of authority over you and if there aren't people putting restrictions on you, the environment will do it for them (there are physical restrictions on us that are a result of the way the world is).:
I probably didn't put enough detail in there for me to fully explain; what I meant was that people have the guts to actually speak out, walk out and fully "go off" at their teachers/parents, I can't find the nerve to do such a thing. I agree with you, people are driven to listen to instructions, but people often have a point in which they can't take orders any more, and that brings me to my final point;

The compulsory schooling system will not change until something is changed within the government, and society itself. We have become so enraptured with this idea that, adults are enlightened, and that students need to be taught, but that is not always the case; sometimes adults need to be taught, and sometimes teenagers and children can to the teaching. We don't need to be "naturally" ageist against people who probably know more than we think, and by removing compulsory schooling, we could start making steps towards a much more free society.
the_croftmeister
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7/23/2013 6:33:47 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
I'll respond in the morning, I have to take my girlfriend to the airport so I'm heading to bed, I hope you'll check in tomorrow.
DetectableNinja
Posts: 6,043
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7/23/2013 11:28:20 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
By any chance, are these schools you speak of government-run?
Think'st thou heaven is such a glorious thing?
I tell thee, 'tis not half so fair as thou
Or any man that breathes on earth.

- Christopher Marlowe, Doctor Faustus
DetectableNinja
Posts: 6,043
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7/23/2013 11:33:21 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/23/2013 11:32:36 AM, ConservativePolitico wrote:
Speak to Eitan_Zohar, he dropped out.

Yeah, he was too cool for school, apparently.
Think'st thou heaven is such a glorious thing?
I tell thee, 'tis not half so fair as thou
Or any man that breathes on earth.

- Christopher Marlowe, Doctor Faustus
Sargon
Posts: 524
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7/23/2013 1:46:21 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/23/2013 2:54:57 AM, TemperedEmpire wrote:
So, instead, I have come onto website full of people I don't know to ask for advice; should I risk my future education (university) to strike and protest an unjust system? Or am I just a whiny student that no one takes seriously?

The latter, if you ask me.
Subutai
Posts: 3,249
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7/23/2013 2:21:21 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/23/2013 2:54:57 AM, TemperedEmpire wrote:
So, instead, I have come onto website full of people I don't know to ask for advice; should I risk my future education (university) to strike and protest an unjust system? Or am I just a whiny student that no one takes seriously?

Ok, first, there's little chance you're going to get a good job without college. Nevertheless, you do have several good opportunities, such as being a tradesman, but that requires at least a form of schooling. Or you could be an upstart computer programmer. That's likely you're best opportunity (remember that most computer geniuses were college dropouts).

Getting to the point, unless you have a knack for computers, you are a whiny student. No education and success don't mix, most of the time.
I'm becoming less defined as days go by, fading away, and well you might say, I'm losing focus, kinda drifting into the abstract in terms of how I see myself.
muzebreak
Posts: 2,781
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7/23/2013 2:44:25 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/23/2013 2:21:21 PM, Subutai wrote:
At 7/23/2013 2:54:57 AM, TemperedEmpire wrote:
So, instead, I have come onto website full of people I don't know to ask for advice; should I risk my future education (university) to strike and protest an unjust system? Or am I just a whiny student that no one takes seriously?

Ok, first, there's little chance you're going to get a good job without college. Nevertheless, you do have several good opportunities, such as being a tradesman, but that requires at least a form of schooling. Or you could be an upstart computer programmer. That's likely you're best opportunity (remember that most computer geniuses were college dropouts).

Nope, sorry, that's not even close to true. Contrary to popular belief, the likes of Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, and Steve Jobs, are not computer geniuses. Gates is good with computers, heck he could be considered great, but a genius he is not. Mark Zuckerberg has been described as a prodigy in the area of computer programming, but he received large amounts of private education during his younger years. Genius, I feel, might be a bit of a stretch for him. Finally, Jobs, Jobs could hardly even be considered great with computers. The first two apple models were entirely the work of The Woz, who did graduate college. Contrary to what people seem to think these three did not drop out because they couldn't learn anything from college, they dropped out because they were already making enough money, or in Jobs case; to be a hippy.


Getting to the point, unless you have a knack for computers, you are a whiny student.

What if he has a knack for physics, or maths, or engineering, or writing, or various other things? To paraphrase Will Hunting, a college education is something that can be gotten for a $1.50 in late charges at the library. I can get a full MIT education, for free. It just wouldn't be certified. So, if this guy hates school, as long as he can pass an equivalency, he should leave if he wants to. If he can't, he should suck it up. Either way, he isn't necessarily a whiny student, just because he isn't coming up with billion dollar company ideas in the middle of his schooling.

No education and success don't mix, most of the time.
"Every kid starts out as a natural-born scientist, and then we beat it out of them. A few trickle through the system with their wonder and enthusiasm for science intact." - Carl Sagan

This is the response of the defenders of Sparta to the Commander of the Roman Army: "If you are a god, you will not hurt those who have never injured you. If you are a man, advance - you will find men equal to yourself. And women.
Eitan_Zohar
Posts: 2,697
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7/23/2013 2:52:56 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/23/2013 2:54:57 AM, TemperedEmpire wrote:
I hate school, it is the basis for my suffering everyday of everyone since I started attending. Being in grade 10 now, I have experienced little in the way of freedom from the adults at in institute. One of the big harps I have against it is the lack of freedom of speech (something I believe everyone loves) and the fact that in Australia, almost no schools allow free dress.

So, since I got my act together not to long ago and became a liberal, I've had this idea in my head that goes along the lines of protesting the schooling system; a hunger strike, a walk out, anything to topple the tyrannical system. I wish to start one, but because I've been brainwashed by essentially all society, I can't bring myself to do it.

So, instead, I have come onto website full of people I don't know to ask for advice; should I risk my future education (university) to strike and protest an unjust system? Or am I just a whiny student that no one takes seriously?

I dropped out in 9th grade; took my GED. I'm free as a birdy.
"It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book."
Eitan_Zohar
Posts: 2,697
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7/23/2013 2:53:53 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/23/2013 11:33:21 AM, DetectableNinja wrote:
At 7/23/2013 11:32:36 AM, ConservativePolitico wrote:
Speak to Eitan_Zohar, he dropped out.

Yeah, he was too cool for school, apparently.

You know it.
"It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book."
Poetaster
Posts: 587
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7/23/2013 3:00:25 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/23/2013 2:52:56 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 7/23/2013 2:54:57 AM, TemperedEmpire wrote:
I hate school, it is the basis for my suffering everyday of everyone since I started attending. Being in grade 10 now, I have experienced little in the way of freedom from the adults at in institute. One of the big harps I have against it is the lack of freedom of speech (something I believe everyone loves) and the fact that in Australia, almost no schools allow free dress.

So, since I got my act together not to long ago and became a liberal, I've had this idea in my head that goes along the lines of protesting the schooling system; a hunger strike, a walk out, anything to topple the tyrannical system. I wish to start one, but because I've been brainwashed by essentially all society, I can't bring myself to do it.

So, instead, I have come onto website full of people I don't know to ask for advice; should I risk my future education (university) to strike and protest an unjust system? Or am I just a whiny student that no one takes seriously?

I dropped out in 9th grade; took my GED. I'm free as a birdy.

http://www.theurbanabo.com...
"The book you are looking for hasn't been written yet. What you are looking for you are going to have to find yourself, it's not going to be in a book..." -Sidewalker
the_croftmeister
Posts: 678
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7/23/2013 6:56:30 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/23/2013 6:09:22 AM, TemperedEmpire wrote:
I really don't agree with this "time and a place" argument; for me, you should be allowed to speak the most hateful things imaginable. I may not like it (in fact I often do dislike hate speech), the school my not like it, and many other people may not like it, but I wish freedom of speech to extend as far as possible. What type of offensive speech blocks the pathway to the "educational objectives" of the school, in your opinion?
Offensive speech generates heated discussions and potentially arguments. If a teacher cannot have order in a classroom then they cannot teach the students as they either won't be able to hear or simply won't be listening.

Another interesting way to look at it is this. You wish all teenagers to be able to say whatever they want in the classroom. Well, for starters they technically can (unless they are taping your mouth shut). Secondly, why does this freedom of speech not extend to the principal telling you to be quiet. Unless they are hurting you, or physically stopping you from speaking all they are doing is telling you off. Is this not within the rights of free speech as well (if we take them to be absolute)? How is telling you off materially different from offensive speech. Both use words to try to get an effect out of the other person, both are quite intimidating and often have the effect of shutting the other person up (which would be a violation of their free speech rights). Now of course other punishments like detentions and such can be applied, but as I said, if people were allowed to wantonly disregard others feelings and say hateful things in your classroom can you honestly say any work would get done? Of course, your commitment to removing compulsory schooling might resolve these issues, but then again it might not. Maybe you could find a teacher who would be willing to run a trial class during lunch time in which speech regulations are not enforced and see what happens?

I think the schooling system would be better if
1. They allowed free dress; at my school, almost every student I come across seems to dislike the uniform system, and the fact that they naturally obscure freedom of expression makes it even more horrendous.
Horrendous is a strong word but again, I'll take it in the spirit in which it was intended. I was a student also, nobody like uniforms particularly, but nobody really cared about it that much either. It also protects some students who do not feel comfortable with their own individuality yet (this may not be enough to justify it to you but we have to at least consider it).

2. What school non-compulsory; I do not agree with compulsory schooling, I have already explained that. But to answer your question "when should compulsory schooling end?", I would have to answer right away. It may pain me to say this, but I would much prefer a free society over one that had 100% education, even though free and educated can often be considered synonyms today. Also (as much as I hate social Darwinism) it could compel those people who truly want to go and further their education after primary school to go to high school. I believe (and there will be differing thoughts on this) that (if high school was compulsory) students in primary school should be advertised the benefits of further education. If you sell high school off as something that truly furthers you in life, it probably would compel them to go on and join.
I meant at what age but it seems clear that you mean at high school age now. I presume you mean if high school was non-compulsory in the second last sentence. Yes this would work for a number of students. Would it work for all of them? For the ones who would choose to go anyway does it even matter? It is the children who would choose not to go regardless of how attractive we made it sound that we have to worry about. We also have to consider their parents, some parents do not value education. Unless you are also planning on making school free it is the parents who ultimately pay for it and thus ultimately they who have to be convinced. Unless you have ideas for alternative parenting arrangements? At what age do you think a child has the knowledge required to make sensible choices about their education? Because you have to realise, it's not the ability to make reasoned choices alone that matters, they also have to have the relevant facts on which to use those reasoning skills.

I probably didn't put enough detail in there for me to fully explain; what I meant was that people have the guts to actually speak out, walk out and fully "go off" at their teachers/parents, I can't find the nerve to do such a thing. I agree with you, people are driven to listen to instructions, but people often have a point in which they can't take orders any more, and that brings me to my final point;

The compulsory schooling system will not change until something is changed within the government, and society itself. We have become so enraptured with this idea that, adults are enlightened, and that students need to be taught, but that is not always the case; sometimes adults need to be taught, and sometimes teenagers and children can to the teaching.
All true, though an advocate of compulsory schooling would just use this to argue that compulsory schooling should be extended to older people as well, as opposed to abolishing it all together. School is a means to acquire knowledge, not intelligence (although arguably it does both) and it is a simple fact that you have to acquire that knowledge from somewhere. Adults do need to be taught, and they too often assume that they know better by virtue of the fact that they are an adult but you won't change this by abolishing compulsory schooling. As you mention, it is an entire culture that needs to be altered.
We don't need to be "naturally" ageist against people who probably know more than we think, and by removing compulsory schooling, we could start making steps towards a much more free society.
Unfortunately the entire meaning of 'natural' is that it simply is, there is no 'need' about it. People naturally assume that people younger than them know less (and a majority of the time this is true, though less so as you get older) but that is different from being more intelligent or having good arguments at a given time. Ageism, like sexism and racism are extensions of actual differences between people (not imagined ones) to the point of discrimination. You can't just pretend the differences don't exist and expect that to solve the problem. That being said, I know there are teachers out there who have authority complexes, just as there are students out there that are rebellious for the sake of it. What positive steps would you like to take to do something about it? And I'm sorry but I just don't see striking and protesting as being positive.
THE_OPINIONATOR
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7/25/2013 10:48:02 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/23/2013 2:54:57 AM, TemperedEmpire wrote:
I hate school, it is the basis for my suffering everyday of everyone since I started attending. Being in grade 10 now, I have experienced little in the way of freedom from the adults at in institute. One of the big harps I have against it is the lack of freedom of speech (something I believe everyone loves) and the fact that in Australia, almost no schools allow free dress.

So, since I got my act together not to long ago and became a liberal, I've had this idea in my head that goes along the lines of protesting the schooling system; a hunger strike, a walk out, anything to topple the tyrannical system. I wish to start one, but because I've been brainwashed by essentially all society, I can't bring myself to do it.

So, instead, I have come onto website full of people I don't know to ask for advice; should I risk my future education (university) to strike and protest an unjust system? Or am I just a whiny student that no one takes seriously?

Well thats a little over the top, don't you think? How about you try to I don't know get a career where you can actualy help improve the education system?
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