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Maikuru
Posts: 9,112
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8/13/2013 1:34:20 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Don't study in bed. Also, recall improves if your study environment and mood are similar to those you'll experience during the exam.
"You assume I wouldn't want to burn this whole place to the ground."
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Disquisition
Posts: 391
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8/13/2013 2:47:05 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 8/13/2013 1:34:20 PM, Maikuru wrote:
Don't study in bed. Also, recall improves if your study environment and mood are similar to those you'll experience during the exam.

Yeah I always fell asleep when I studied too comfortably noted

However I've heard that If you study some material then take a quick nap then it sticks to your brain more.
tulle
Posts: 4,445
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8/13/2013 2:55:38 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I can't stress enough how important it is to do your readings ahead of class. That way when your prof is lecturing, you're hearing the material for a second time and you can make more sense of it and ask better questions. Highlight and make notes as you're reading.

I like studying to a specific album, then replaying the album in my head as I take the exam. If the class has a lot of terms/people/dates/concepts to memorize, I make cue cards. I prefer to studying in the library to studying at home.
yang.
Wallstreetatheist
Posts: 7,132
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8/13/2013 4:35:06 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
When you are scheduling your classes, do not take only 15 hours (five classes). Take at least six (18 hours) and realize that seven (21 hours) is perfectly doable. The more classes you take, the less likely you are to partake in the more unsavory proclivities that are associated with the general collegiate experience. You will also graduate earlier, which will likely save you money if you're taking out student loans.

Summer classes are easier but more expensive. If, like me, you hated lab sciences take them in the summer if you are able too without incurring debt because although the lectures are three hours long per day and the amount of reading you must do per night is more intense, the burden is over in a month.

Study/travel abroad as a student. This might mean teaching english for a year in South Korea. A good friend of mine did that last summer, and she loved it. That might mean spending the summer months in a foreign country to "learn the language" through an affiliated university. If you find yourself in German-speaking Europe, hit me up and I'll tell you a few awesome places to go. Oh, and don't forget to take an international cell phone. Communication stateside is a b!tch without one.

Buy a good computer, with an even better warranty. Computers are finicky beasts, and you want one that's going to last you all four years. I personally recommend a 13 inch Macbook Pro. If you buy a Mac, be sure to get Applecare. But, whether you buy a Mac or a PC, do not buy Microsoft office through any place other than your university. Almost all universities get fantastic software discounts. But, if you're the kind of dude who pirates that sh!t, then this probably doesn't apply to you.

On the subject of piracy, don't do it through you're school's internet. Most universities monitor data traffic and they are able to determine if you're downloading loads of songs of movies from illicit places. Did I mention that most universities consider piracy an honor code violation, and will often result in disciplinary action? Just thought you should know...

When it comes to writing, most students are really bad at it. In fact, I'd say -though I don't have the evidence to prove it- that only about one in every twenty college freshmen are capable of writing an acceptable essay. Freshman writing and composition classes help, but are often not enough. So, avail yourself to either use university resources to help if you're not getting good grades on your essays or go to office hours. I find that History and Philosophy professors are often the best essay editors that I come into contact with. If you make friends with one, they might help you in your other classes... or they might not. But it's worth a shot, often, just to be able to bounce ideas off of Ph. D.'s.

Pick a faculty advisor who is (1) competent, (2) who you trust and (3) who will mentor/coach you. I had an amazing undergraduate advisor... and I can say with confidence that my experience in that regard was the exception rather than the rule. After hearing other's stories, my god... I got really lucky. Luck, however, can be facilitated by good choices -so make the choice to select a good faculty advisor.

If you're gay, don't have high hopes for the other gay guys/gals on campus. LGBT groups are often filled with people who personify stereotypes, who talk about feelings too much and who are overly dramatic. I say this as a (pretty masculine) gay guy... while there will be some people who you'll probably make friends with, and may even 'like' be prepared for drama, glitter and fairy dust nonsense.

Make friends with people who are older than you, who are involved in things that you might want to be involved in. It's always better to know someone in a group than just show up cold and try to make new friends. I found that the best way to do that was to take a few 400 level electives as a freshman.

Do not hesitate to take the lead in group projects. College kids, as a rule, need direction in their lives -and what better than another college kid to give it to them? Often, it is nothing more than a crisis of leadership which results in a group project failure. To learn how to overcome this (i.e. to figure out how to step up and lead) is often the broader point of collaborative or group projects, rather than actually complete a given task.

When studying, it's often really effective to teach the material you're trying to learn to others. That might mean posting some thoughts on the last book you just read on DDO, or it could mean a long conversation with your room mate about Infinite Jest (if, of course, you were dumb enough to sign up for a modern American lit class -lolz).

When studying, don't take adderall the night before a test, cram for 12 hrs and expect to get an A. As a general rule, using drugs to study is an incredibly risky enterprise. Not only to ALL American universities consider it a violation of academic integrity, but it could get you expelled if you're caught on or off campus with Rx drugs you were't proscribed. Ironically, cocaine is not considered a violation of academic integrity -but a student conduct violation. Talk about stupid policies... but I digress. DO NOT USE COCAINE! lulz

Realize that having sex is fun, but it tends to piss off other people when they hear it. If you bring a "screamer" back to your dorm, the next time you and your buddies go out drinking, you might get "cock blocked" because no one else wants to hear you have fun -and dorm walls are very thin. The point? Whatever "sexy time" decisions you make, consider the impact those decisions will have on others. Your RM will not like hearing you and your "playmate" either.

RM's (resident mentors) are essentially glorified hall monitors, and while they have real responsibility, some care and some don't. There are some who very much get off on enforcing the disciplinary code to the letter. There are others (mine, freshman year) who will be happy to share your room mate's vaporizer.

On the subject of vaporizers, be aware that they actually do have a smell and that when/if you use one, anyone who comes within about twenty feet of your room will know what you're doing NO MATTER WHAT you do to masque the smell. So, don't smoke, vape or anything pot related in your dorm. It's just not worth the risk.

Regarding money, manage it well. Don't buy things you don't need, or food items that will make you fat. You'll miss the money and wish that you'd never eaten that box of cookies from Insomnia (even if their white chocolate macadamia nut is on par with a blow job). Generally speaking, salads are the way to go.

Drink coffee, but not too much coffee. Coffee is cheaper than Red Bull, tastes better and is thousands of times better for you. Coffee has antioxidants, it has been linked to lower rates of depression, it promotes healthy digestion, it stimulates the mind and invigorates the body -hot or iced. It's also considerably cheaper then energy drinks -which are terrible for you, are expensive and will only increase the anxiety you already feel for that upcoming test.

Dump your high school boyfriend/girlfriend amicably, and if possible try to renin friends. You can either believe that I know what I'm talking about, or see why I'm giving you this advice when you go home for Thanksgiving. ;)

Don't spend a lot of time on Facebook. You are in college to network, to make friends and to meet new people -not to only keep in touch with your high school "buds." If making the most of any new experience is the point of college, don't live in the past. You can catch up with everyone you left behind over Christmas break.

Don't spend spring break an Cancun, or any other equally worthless vacation destination. Do go on trips with your school. I went on several, and I gained more from them than from almost any other "extra curricular" I participated in, while an undergrad. Btw. DO join honor societies.
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Primal Diet. Lifting. Reading. Psychedelics. Cold-Approach Pickup. Music.
Wallstreetatheist
Posts: 7,132
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8/13/2013 4:35:29 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
You are at the first point in your life that actually matters, and for that your should be proud of yourself. You should also be wary of the temptations that college offers.

Drugs are not cool. I talk about drugs a lot, namely because I like them, but I quit doing them after my sophomore year in college. Smoking isn't cool either, and you shouldn't take it up. I doubt many on here will rush fraternities/sororities, but if you do, make sure your grades don't slip if you plan on going to grad school.

On that subject, let's talk about grad school. There is no better time to start figuring out what you want to do after undergraduate then now. Why? Because your entire transcript is relevant to your future, believe it or not. Your grades as a freshman could be the deciding factor of wether you graduate in the top ten percent, top quarter, etc. of your class.

As a college student, you are probably going to be strapped for cash. I came from an upper middle class family, and even then I was frequently cash-poor. Fortunately, I finished undergraduate with no student loans (kept scholarships all the way through).

If you are a freshman and you are on scholarships, your receipt of which is contingent upon maintaining a certain GPA, don't pretend like you're invincible. Those scholarships are VERY important, especially if you plan to go to grad school.

Peter Thiel (a personal hero of mine) said something to the effect of "debt strapped graduates are the last indentured servants of the modern world." (Read the New Yorker's interview with him if you're interested in more on that, in the Profiles section.)

You don't want to be paying off student loans when you're 50.

If you have taken out student loans, recognize that if you get kicked out -for any reason- that there is no windfall that will allow you to escape that debt. Student loans are like an albatross around the necks of entirely too many... they will haunt you until the grave. I say this not to scare, but to inform.

If you are majoring in something that is pointless (exercise science, theatric studies, history, 20th century American pop culture, music theory, or any form of art other than graphic design), AND you are taking out student loans in pursuit of your pointless degree, be DAMN sure that the consequences of that decision are something you are ready to live with.

Do not make the mistake of thinking that you are smarter than your professors. You are not. There is no escaping that.

Do not make the mistake of being a douche to your professors. If they don't like you, they will not help you get the grades you need. For example: Let's say that you go to a school where they penalize you one letter grade for every additional class missed after five absences -and you miss nine classes. If I were teaching your class, I wouldn't care so long as you could pass my tests/your essays were not sh!t. Some professors are flexible. Others are "letter of the law" rather than "spirit of the law" type people.

Grad students are just weird. Some of them are perfectly stupid. Others are brilliant. Most of them have ego complexes. Grad students will often grade your work, which is bullsh!t, but if you get an unfair grade from one (who gives bad grades because it reaffirms their sense of themselves), just talk -rationally- about it with your professor, but if you challenge a grade be VERY sure that you have grounding to do so.

Personally, as a general rule, I can't stand grad students (because they ALL think they are SO much more intelligent then they are -or they are just weird) but you all get the point. You want them to like you as much as possible too, and for very much the same reason.

Do not skip class. In high school, your classes were basically pointless. Here, they are not. Here they mater. And even if they don't, your professor (the person from whom you need a good grade) will think that everything he/she tells you is important. Learn as much as you can, and do so with humility.

Go to guest lectures and meet people. Network the hell out of every opportunity you can. Build a LinkedIn account. Doing so will benefit you later in life.

Get involved as much as you can, in things that matter to you. Don't join the mountain climbing team to say that you have joined the mountain climbing team. Join it because you are passionate about mountain climbing, and ONLY because you are passionate about mountain climbing.

That being said, academic extra-durriculars (like debate, mock trial, model UN, etc.) are fantastic to both put on your resume AND to participate in.

Do an internship of some kind. For the more politically inclined, work for a campaign. It's a life-changing experience.

Take varied and challenging classes. Don't take classes that are easy A's. Take something that will require you to apply yourself, that you may get the most out of your college experience. That is imperative.

Do NOT get caught with alcohol, drugs or etc. You will (1) loose your scholarship at minimum and (2) risk getting kicked out of the university.

Do NOT cheat or plagiarize. You will get kicked out of your university and blackballed from higher education.

DO make friends with your roommate, and be honest with them. Treat them and their belongings with respect, and require that they treat you and your belongings with respect (in a friendly way, of course).

DO make friends -on your hall and in your classes. Form study groups. Build alliances. They will be useful later, and it's nice to have people to talk to.

Be friendly and open minded. College is an experience like no other. I grew up in the gated off flanks of American society... i.e. Suburbia, USA. My worldview was about as broad as a boulevard and my mind as open as an oil drum. Embrace the diversity of the environment.

In general, make the most of it. Don't waste a day.

Hope this is useful.

Peace and Love,

YYW
DRUG HARM: http://imgur.com...
Primal Diet. Lifting. Reading. Psychedelics. Cold-Approach Pickup. Music.
YYW
Posts: 36,289
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8/13/2013 5:19:41 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 8/13/2013 4:35:39 PM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
Just listen to YYW

lol....

I had forgotten I wrote that...
Tsar of DDO
Jack212
Posts: 572
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8/13/2013 6:56:47 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 8/13/2013 1:16:23 PM, Disquisition wrote:
About to start this Fall

The main advice I want is study advice, any suggestions?

Actually do it. Get a textbook and read it from start to finish before the course even starts. Don't download the PDF, get the actual, printed book so you don't need a power source and don't wreck your eyes/brain while reading it. If you're finding your subject boring (and don't want to drop it), start a forum topic about it on here. Explaining stuff to idiots over and over helps it stick in your brain. Avoid study groups, they tend to be made up of pompous d!ckheads and pseudo-intellectuals who don't want your input. Also, the discussion will turn to non-study related stuff several times a session. If you have tutorials, attend them all even if you know the subject matter. It's easier to stay ahead than catch up. Form a good relationship with your lecturers, tutors and course co-ordinator, as that makes it easier to ask them questions and get help with stuff. And above all, avoid activist groups and drunken parties. Those waste valuable time/brain power and don't contribute to your education in the slightest.