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How much nonfiction can you read every day?

Eitan_Zohar
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9/21/2013 6:58:36 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I'm currently trudging through this book: [http://www.amazon.com...] at about 35 pages a day. I can go through 200 pages a day of fiction. Y.
"It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book."
cybertron1998
Posts: 5,818
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9/21/2013 7:11:14 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/21/2013 6:58:36 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
I'm currently trudging through this book: [http://www.amazon.com...] at about 35 pages a day. I can go through 200 pages a day of fiction. Y.

it depends on the topic of the nonfiction. I read through the book written by one of the seal team six guys in a week
Epsilon: There are so many stories where some brave hero decides to give their life to save the day, and because of their sacrifice, the good guys win, the survivors all cheer, and everybody lives happily ever after. But the hero... never gets to see that ending. They'll never know if their sacrifice actually made a difference. They'll never know if the day was really saved. In the end, they just have to have faith.
Subutai
Posts: 3,263
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9/21/2013 7:12:52 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
It depends on the book. I've gotten through two easy science books in four days (two per book). Before that, I read a book on the Epic of Gilgamesh, and that took me about four days.
I'm becoming less defined as days go by, fading away, and well you might say, I'm losing focus, kinda drifting into the abstract in terms of how I see myself.
cybertron1998
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9/21/2013 7:13:18 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/21/2013 7:11:14 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 9/21/2013 6:58:36 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
I'm currently trudging through this book: [http://www.amazon.com...] at about 35 pages a day. I can go through 200 pages a day of fiction. Y.

it depends on the topic of the nonfiction. I read through the book written by one of the seal team six guys in a week

so if your talking like that nonfiction about 200 a day. if its more encyclopedia/history book-ish then probably 50 a day
Epsilon: There are so many stories where some brave hero decides to give their life to save the day, and because of their sacrifice, the good guys win, the survivors all cheer, and everybody lives happily ever after. But the hero... never gets to see that ending. They'll never know if their sacrifice actually made a difference. They'll never know if the day was really saved. In the end, they just have to have faith.
Eitan_Zohar
Posts: 2,697
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9/21/2013 7:27:16 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/21/2013 7:13:18 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 9/21/2013 7:11:14 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 9/21/2013 6:58:36 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
I'm currently trudging through this book: [http://www.amazon.com...] at about 35 pages a day. I can go through 200 pages a day of fiction. Y.

it depends on the topic of the nonfiction. I read through the book written by one of the seal team six guys in a week

so if your talking like that nonfiction about 200 a day. if its more encyclopedia/history book-ish then probably 50 a day

It's much more history oriented. Look inside.

It's just very frustrating for me because I know that I can easily go much faster. I can't concentrate. It's not that the book is boring, I just can't keep my mind still enough to focus.
"It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book."
AnDoctuir
Posts: 11,060
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9/21/2013 7:27:51 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I'm not so bad once I can be bothered and rather move through nonfiction, but I generally can't be bothered. I read The Name of the Wind in a day, though. I'd say it's to do with suspense, fiction being a greater mode of escape, which is all anyone is really looking for in reading.
000ike
Posts: 11,196
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9/21/2013 8:05:14 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/21/2013 7:27:16 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 9/21/2013 7:13:18 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 9/21/2013 7:11:14 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 9/21/2013 6:58:36 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
I'm currently trudging through this book: [http://www.amazon.com...] at about 35 pages a day. I can go through 200 pages a day of fiction. Y.

it depends on the topic of the nonfiction. I read through the book written by one of the seal team six guys in a week

so if your talking like that nonfiction about 200 a day. if its more encyclopedia/history book-ish then probably 50 a day

It's much more history oriented. Look inside.

It's just very frustrating for me because I know that I can easily go much faster. I can't concentrate. It's not that the book is boring, I just can't keep my mind still enough to focus.

I think he means textbook-style history. Your book is a biography.
"A stupid despot may constrain his slaves with iron chains; but a true politician binds them even more strongly with the chain of their own ideas" - Michel Foucault
Eitan_Zohar
Posts: 2,697
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9/21/2013 9:44:12 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/21/2013 8:05:14 PM, 000ike wrote:
At 9/21/2013 7:27:16 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 9/21/2013 7:13:18 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 9/21/2013 7:11:14 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 9/21/2013 6:58:36 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
I'm currently trudging through this book: [http://www.amazon.com...] at about 35 pages a day. I can go through 200 pages a day of fiction. Y.

it depends on the topic of the nonfiction. I read through the book written by one of the seal team six guys in a week

so if your talking like that nonfiction about 200 a day. if its more encyclopedia/history book-ish then probably 50 a day

It's much more history oriented. Look inside.

It's just very frustrating for me because I know that I can easily go much faster. I can't concentrate. It's not that the book is boring, I just can't keep my mind still enough to focus.

I think he means textbook-style history. Your book is a biography.

No, it's a history (although not a "textbook-style one"). Biographies are, uh, for people.
"It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book."
000ike
Posts: 11,196
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9/21/2013 9:59:34 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/21/2013 9:44:12 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 9/21/2013 8:05:14 PM, 000ike wrote:
At 9/21/2013 7:27:16 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 9/21/2013 7:13:18 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 9/21/2013 7:11:14 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 9/21/2013 6:58:36 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
I'm currently trudging through this book: [http://www.amazon.com...] at about 35 pages a day. I can go through 200 pages a day of fiction. Y.

it depends on the topic of the nonfiction. I read through the book written by one of the seal team six guys in a week

so if your talking like that nonfiction about 200 a day. if its more encyclopedia/history book-ish then probably 50 a day

It's much more history oriented. Look inside.

It's just very frustrating for me because I know that I can easily go much faster. I can't concentrate. It's not that the book is boring, I just can't keep my mind still enough to focus.

I think he means textbook-style history. Your book is a biography.

No, it's a history (although not a "textbook-style one"). Biographies are, uh, for people.

lol yeah, my mistake. I saw biography without actually paying attention to the whole title. But yeah, I mean, anything where you don't need to recall small details from memory shouldn't take too long.
"A stupid despot may constrain his slaves with iron chains; but a true politician binds them even more strongly with the chain of their own ideas" - Michel Foucault
Eitan_Zohar
Posts: 2,697
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9/21/2013 10:04:29 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/21/2013 9:59:34 PM, 000ike wrote:
At 9/21/2013 9:44:12 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 9/21/2013 8:05:14 PM, 000ike wrote:
At 9/21/2013 7:27:16 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 9/21/2013 7:13:18 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 9/21/2013 7:11:14 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 9/21/2013 6:58:36 PM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
I'm currently trudging through this book: [http://www.amazon.com...] at about 35 pages a day. I can go through 200 pages a day of fiction. Y.

it depends on the topic of the nonfiction. I read through the book written by one of the seal team six guys in a week

so if your talking like that nonfiction about 200 a day. if its more encyclopedia/history book-ish then probably 50 a day

It's much more history oriented. Look inside.

It's just very frustrating for me because I know that I can easily go much faster. I can't concentrate. It's not that the book is boring, I just can't keep my mind still enough to focus.

I think he means textbook-style history. Your book is a biography.

No, it's a history (although not a "textbook-style one"). Biographies are, uh, for people.

lol yeah, my mistake. I saw biography without actually paying attention to the whole title. But yeah, I mean, anything where you don't need to recall small details from memory shouldn't take too long.

It's not too complicated. But I'm fed up with the fact that I'm getting like a quarter of the amount of reading done that I can.
"It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book."
DetectableNinja
Posts: 6,043
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9/21/2013 11:23:33 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Do you like not care about fiction or something?
Think'st thou heaven is such a glorious thing?
I tell thee, 'tis not half so fair as thou
Or any man that breathes on earth.

- Christopher Marlowe, Doctor Faustus
YYW
Posts: 36,426
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9/22/2013 7:17:58 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
It depends on how interested in something I am. If I'm really interested in something, I can read about 1000-1200 words a minute, if not, that number can drop to as low as 500 wpm.

If I'm familiar with a topic, whether I'm interested or not, I can read about 1000 wpm. But even if I am interested in a topic but I don't know much about it, that number can drop to between 400-800 wpm depending on how complex something is.

(I know this, because there are apps online which can test how fast you read, lol.)
Tsar of DDO
YYW
Posts: 36,426
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9/22/2013 7:19:05 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/21/2013 11:23:33 PM, DetectableNinja wrote:
Do you like not care about fiction or something?

I think non-fiction is just harder to follow than fiction; because we are made to tell/hear stories. Our brains have to work harder (or, most of ours do) to read/memorize facts.
Tsar of DDO
cybertron1998
Posts: 5,818
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9/22/2013 7:30:18 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/22/2013 7:19:05 AM, YYW wrote:
At 9/21/2013 11:23:33 PM, DetectableNinja wrote:
Do you like not care about fiction or something?

I think non-fiction is just harder to follow than fiction; because we are made to tell/hear stories. Our brains have to work harder (or, most of ours do) to read/memorize facts.

that's not completely true. let me go back to that book written by the seal team six guy. it was all based on facts but I was able to take it in pretty easily. I think it also depends on what you like. I like military so I can process all of that very easily.
Epsilon: There are so many stories where some brave hero decides to give their life to save the day, and because of their sacrifice, the good guys win, the survivors all cheer, and everybody lives happily ever after. But the hero... never gets to see that ending. They'll never know if their sacrifice actually made a difference. They'll never know if the day was really saved. In the end, they just have to have faith.
YYW
Posts: 36,426
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9/22/2013 7:35:06 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/22/2013 7:30:18 AM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 9/22/2013 7:19:05 AM, YYW wrote:
At 9/21/2013 11:23:33 PM, DetectableNinja wrote:
Do you like not care about fiction or something?

I think non-fiction is just harder to follow than fiction; because we are made to tell/hear stories. Our brains have to work harder (or, most of ours do) to read/memorize facts.

that's not completely true. let me go back to that book written by the seal team six guy. it was all based on facts but I was able to take it in pretty easily. I think it also depends on what you like. I like military so I can process all of that very easily.

You were reading a non-fiction story, which would be pretty interesting (to you, I assume) which means that you would read it faster and follow it easier because you'd be actively engaged in the material.
Tsar of DDO
cybertron1998
Posts: 5,818
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9/22/2013 7:36:15 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/22/2013 7:35:06 AM, YYW wrote:
At 9/22/2013 7:30:18 AM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 9/22/2013 7:19:05 AM, YYW wrote:
At 9/21/2013 11:23:33 PM, DetectableNinja wrote:
Do you like not care about fiction or something?

I think non-fiction is just harder to follow than fiction; because we are made to tell/hear stories. Our brains have to work harder (or, most of ours do) to read/memorize facts.

that's not completely true. let me go back to that book written by the seal team six guy. it was all based on facts but I was able to take it in pretty easily. I think it also depends on what you like. I like military so I can process all of that very easily.

You were reading a non-fiction story, which would be pretty interesting (to you, I assume) which means that you would read it faster and follow it easier because you'd be actively engaged in the material.

exactly but I also have book about all of the warplanes throughout history and I can grasp it really well too
Epsilon: There are so many stories where some brave hero decides to give their life to save the day, and because of their sacrifice, the good guys win, the survivors all cheer, and everybody lives happily ever after. But the hero... never gets to see that ending. They'll never know if their sacrifice actually made a difference. They'll never know if the day was really saved. In the end, they just have to have faith.
YYW
Posts: 36,426
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9/22/2013 7:44:09 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/22/2013 7:36:15 AM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 9/22/2013 7:35:06 AM, YYW wrote:
At 9/22/2013 7:30:18 AM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 9/22/2013 7:19:05 AM, YYW wrote:
At 9/21/2013 11:23:33 PM, DetectableNinja wrote:
Do you like not care about fiction or something?

I think non-fiction is just harder to follow than fiction; because we are made to tell/hear stories. Our brains have to work harder (or, most of ours do) to read/memorize facts.

that's not completely true. let me go back to that book written by the seal team six guy. it was all based on facts but I was able to take it in pretty easily. I think it also depends on what you like. I like military so I can process all of that very easily.

You were reading a non-fiction story, which would be pretty interesting (to you, I assume) which means that you would read it faster and follow it easier because you'd be actively engaged in the material.

exactly but I also have book about all of the warplanes throughout history and I can grasp it really well too

And how fast you read/process anything heavily depends on how interested you are in it/how much you know about what you're reading about.
Tsar of DDO
cybertron1998
Posts: 5,818
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9/22/2013 7:44:47 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/22/2013 7:44:09 AM, YYW wrote:
At 9/22/2013 7:36:15 AM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 9/22/2013 7:35:06 AM, YYW wrote:
At 9/22/2013 7:30:18 AM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 9/22/2013 7:19:05 AM, YYW wrote:
At 9/21/2013 11:23:33 PM, DetectableNinja wrote:
Do you like not care about fiction or something?

I think non-fiction is just harder to follow than fiction; because we are made to tell/hear stories. Our brains have to work harder (or, most of ours do) to read/memorize facts.

that's not completely true. let me go back to that book written by the seal team six guy. it was all based on facts but I was able to take it in pretty easily. I think it also depends on what you like. I like military so I can process all of that very easily.

You were reading a non-fiction story, which would be pretty interesting (to you, I assume) which means that you would read it faster and follow it easier because you'd be actively engaged in the material.

exactly but I also have book about all of the warplanes throughout history and I can grasp it really well too

And how fast you read/process anything heavily depends on how interested you are in it/how much you know about what you're reading about.

yep
Epsilon: There are so many stories where some brave hero decides to give their life to save the day, and because of their sacrifice, the good guys win, the survivors all cheer, and everybody lives happily ever after. But the hero... never gets to see that ending. They'll never know if their sacrifice actually made a difference. They'll never know if the day was really saved. In the end, they just have to have faith.
Eitan_Zohar
Posts: 2,697
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9/22/2013 9:58:11 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/22/2013 7:17:58 AM, YYW wrote:
It depends on how interested in something I am. If I'm really interested in something, I can read about 1000-1200 words a minute, if not, that number can drop to as low as 500 wpm.

If I'm familiar with a topic, whether I'm interested or not, I can read about 1000 wpm. But even if I am interested in a topic but I don't know much about it, that number can drop to between 400-800 wpm depending on how complex something is.

(I know this, because there are apps online which can test how fast you read, lol.)

Wpm is not a good measure of how much you can read. My problem is that I simply can't focus. I can read pretty fast, and so my wpm would be totally misleading as to how much I could get through.
"It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book."
Eitan_Zohar
Posts: 2,697
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9/22/2013 10:00:27 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/22/2013 7:19:05 AM, YYW wrote:
At 9/21/2013 11:23:33 PM, DetectableNinja wrote:
Do you like not care about fiction or something?

I think non-fiction is just harder to follow than fiction; because we are made to tell/hear stories. Our brains have to work harder (or, most of ours do) to read/memorize facts.

Read America's Secret War or The Holocaust in American Life and come back and say that again. Hell, just look at the Amazon previews.
"It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book."
YYW
Posts: 36,426
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9/22/2013 10:04:18 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/22/2013 9:58:11 AM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 9/22/2013 7:17:58 AM, YYW wrote:
It depends on how interested in something I am. If I'm really interested in something, I can read about 1000-1200 words a minute, if not, that number can drop to as low as 500 wpm.

If I'm familiar with a topic, whether I'm interested or not, I can read about 1000 wpm. But even if I am interested in a topic but I don't know much about it, that number can drop to between 400-800 wpm depending on how complex something is.

(I know this, because there are apps online which can test how fast you read, lol.)

Wpm is not a good measure of how much you can read. My problem is that I simply can't focus.

Obviously I could read much faster if I wasn't processing the material; lol... but then I wouldn't be reading... I would be staring at pages.

I can read pretty fast, and so my wpm would be totally misleading as to how much I could get through.

If you aren't registering what you're looking at, then you're not reading...
Tsar of DDO
Eitan_Zohar
Posts: 2,697
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9/22/2013 10:12:08 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/22/2013 10:04:18 AM, YYW wrote:
At 9/22/2013 9:58:11 AM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 9/22/2013 7:17:58 AM, YYW wrote:
It depends on how interested in something I am. If I'm really interested in something, I can read about 1000-1200 words a minute, if not, that number can drop to as low as 500 wpm.

If I'm familiar with a topic, whether I'm interested or not, I can read about 1000 wpm. But even if I am interested in a topic but I don't know much about it, that number can drop to between 400-800 wpm depending on how complex something is.

(I know this, because there are apps online which can test how fast you read, lol.)

Wpm is not a good measure of how much you can read. My problem is that I simply can't focus.

Obviously I could read much faster if I wasn't processing the material; lol... but then I wouldn't be reading... I would be staring at pages.

I can read pretty fast, and so my wpm would be totally misleading as to how much I could get through.

If you aren't registering what you're looking at, then you're not reading...

I do read. But then I space out, think about something else, walk around sometimes, before I finally manage to get myself reading again. I'm not one of those people who can read for pages while thinking about pancakes; I catch myself before that happens. I just can't keep my mind on the goddamn book.
"It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book."
000ike
Posts: 11,196
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9/22/2013 10:14:40 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/22/2013 9:58:11 AM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 9/22/2013 7:17:58 AM, YYW wrote:
It depends on how interested in something I am. If I'm really interested in something, I can read about 1000-1200 words a minute, if not, that number can drop to as low as 500 wpm.

If I'm familiar with a topic, whether I'm interested or not, I can read about 1000 wpm. But even if I am interested in a topic but I don't know much about it, that number can drop to between 400-800 wpm depending on how complex something is.

(I know this, because there are apps online which can test how fast you read, lol.)

Wpm is not a good measure of how much you can read. My problem is that I simply can't focus. I can read pretty fast, and so my wpm would be totally misleading as to how much I could get through.

isn't focus part of what's being measured in wpm?.....

I really wish I could just glance at sentences and instantly know what they say, like some people, but I don't think I read enough early enough to have that ability :P
"A stupid despot may constrain his slaves with iron chains; but a true politician binds them even more strongly with the chain of their own ideas" - Michel Foucault
YYW
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9/22/2013 10:22:39 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/22/2013 10:12:08 AM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 9/22/2013 10:04:18 AM, YYW wrote:
At 9/22/2013 9:58:11 AM, Eitan_Zohar wrote:
At 9/22/2013 7:17:58 AM, YYW wrote:
It depends on how interested in something I am. If I'm really interested in something, I can read about 1000-1200 words a minute, if not, that number can drop to as low as 500 wpm.

If I'm familiar with a topic, whether I'm interested or not, I can read about 1000 wpm. But even if I am interested in a topic but I don't know much about it, that number can drop to between 400-800 wpm depending on how complex something is.

(I know this, because there are apps online which can test how fast you read, lol.)

Wpm is not a good measure of how much you can read. My problem is that I simply can't focus.

Obviously I could read much faster if I wasn't processing the material; lol... but then I wouldn't be reading... I would be staring at pages.

I can read pretty fast, and so my wpm would be totally misleading as to how much I could get through.

If you aren't registering what you're looking at, then you're not reading...

I do read. But then I space out, think about something else, walk around sometimes, before I finally manage to get myself reading again. I'm not one of those people who can read for pages while thinking about pancakes; I catch myself before that happens. I just can't keep my mind on the goddamn book.

One of the things that makes speed reading useful is that the mind can process information a lot faster than it comes in when you vocalize words in your head -which is how most people read. When you think only about concepts and how they relate to one another, then you'll be able to dramatically increase both your attention/focus and your ability to read quickly.

The way that most people read is by a process which basically entails mental vocalization (your sound words out in your head). That's how we were taught to read as children, and that's how most people live their lives reading. That's an incredibly slow process because you can only read as fast as you can phonetically sound out words. For most people, that tops out at around 250-300 wpm. Stopping that, and looking only at the logical relationship of things being discussed will increase your comprehension level (because contextual meaning of sentences will be immediate) tremendously. That requires that you stop viewing words as phonetic devices and start viewing them as concepts.

I doubt that what I just said makes sense, but there are ways to learn to speed read... I'm not really able to teach that here, but there are resources out there if you look for them.
Tsar of DDO
AnDoctuir
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9/22/2013 10:32:50 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
Pretty much what YYW said. I remember once I got bored of reading LOTR, I actually took to reading like a page every two seconds and still held the gist of what was happening to whole way. Vocalizing, i.e., your elocution, just serves a very important purpose, and then it's hard to separate vocalizing from just plain ol' reading.

Something else, however, is that we all have photographic memories, really, and it's just a matter of tapping into that. And so if you can pick up on some logical sequence along the way, your brain will actually do extraordinary things to fill in what went between, and once you become particularly adept, what's to come, too. It's actually many a book I've read the first chapter of and extrapolated its ending by, to be quite honest, and many a movie, too. It just comes down to trusting yourself, I think, in the finish up.
AnDoctuir
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9/22/2013 10:36:45 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
Of course none of that is going to work for extreme intricacy or specificity, but it's a start. The general principle of what's written, say, and where one might go with it, is always very easily perceived.
AnDoctuir
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9/22/2013 10:43:17 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
I would say, too, however, that one might train themselves towards a kind of synesthesia, and so take much more from a page. Perhaps to see an image where they had once seen a word, say, and so allow themselves to see the bigger picture, that which is behind the paper. I've not done this, though, but I don't see it at all as something that must be inherent. And then maybe we might take specific facts and all from a page with extreme speed, not only its logical progression.
AnDoctuir
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9/22/2013 11:00:32 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
It's always kind of subconscious for me, though, that understanding I was talking about - like, I'll often watch a movie up to some point, then go off and complete that movie in my own life, make a bid to solve the problem the movie dealt with, say, then come back and watch the end.

I would say that at some point I kind of cordoned off my conscious mind somewhat, but that really seems to be lifting of late. More and more often I get this little thought that suggests I knew what was going to happen all along, though having never consciously recognized it until its happening. It's certainly not delusion, however, for the thought comes in line with the event happening, but never in view of it.
AnDoctuir
Posts: 11,060
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9/22/2013 11:09:26 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
Time and time again I almost believe profundity of myself, but it's just too profound. I would forget things in my thinking to explain it of myself, but to consider God, then, just blows all that out of the water.