Total Posts:14|Showing Posts:1-14
Jump to topic:

Foreign languages.

bossyburrito
Posts: 14,075
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/2/2014 12:22:48 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Is taking a foreign language on the college level significantly different than taking one on the high-school level? If so, in what ways?
#UnbanTheMadman

"Some will sell their dreams for small desires
Or lose the race to rats
Get caught in ticking traps
And start to dream of somewhere
To relax their restless flight
Somewhere out of a memory of lighted streets on quiet nights..."

~ Rush
ESocialBookworm
Posts: 14,364
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/2/2014 3:46:51 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Je ne sais pas
Solonkr~
I don't care about whether an ideology is "necessary" or not,
I care about how to solve problems,
which is what everyone else should also care about.

Ken~
In essence, the world is fucked up and you can either ignore it, become cynical or bitter about it.

Me~
"BAILEY + SOLON = SAILEY
MY SHIP SAILEY MUST SAIL"

SCREW THAT SHIZ #BANNIE = BAILEY & ANNIE

P.S. Shipped Sailey before it was cannon bitches.
Defro
Posts: 847
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/2/2014 7:52:59 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 12:22:48 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
Is taking a foreign language on the college level significantly different than taking one on the high-school level? If so, in what ways?

You kind of answered your own question. One is a college level course and the other is a high-school level course. I'd say college level foreign language courses are just as hard as AP language courses.
bossyburrito
Posts: 14,075
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/2/2014 3:40:55 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 7:52:59 AM, Defro wrote:
At 10/2/2014 12:22:48 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
Is taking a foreign language on the college level significantly different than taking one on the high-school level? If so, in what ways?

You kind of answered your own question. One is a college level course and the other is a high-school level course. I'd say college level foreign language courses are just as hard as AP language courses.

But the thing is that I don't know how hard AP language courses are in comparison to standard courses, hahah.
#UnbanTheMadman

"Some will sell their dreams for small desires
Or lose the race to rats
Get caught in ticking traps
And start to dream of somewhere
To relax their restless flight
Somewhere out of a memory of lighted streets on quiet nights..."

~ Rush
Defro
Posts: 847
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/2/2014 10:05:34 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 3:40:55 PM, bossyburrito wrote:

But the thing is that I don't know how hard AP language courses are in comparison to standard courses, hahah.

I'd say they are 3 times harder and require at least 2 times as much work.
Mhykiel
Posts: 5,987
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/5/2014 12:02:04 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
College level is harder and better in general. Don't exactly know because I took 2 languages in high-school, 1 in one college and 1 in another.

But i would say learning a foreign language is a good life choice.
YYW
Posts: 36,289
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/5/2014 7:19:37 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/2/2014 12:22:48 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
Is taking a foreign language on the college level significantly different than taking one on the high-school level? If so, in what ways?

I took German and Spanish in high school, and I dabbled in Russian and German in college.

Russian is hard. German is a lot like English. More so than Spanish. Spanish is easier to pick up, although I don't remember anything other than how to order food and alcohol.

The primary differences, as I experienced them, is volume. The quantity of work is much greater in college than in high school. I struggled in Russian, and I am not conversational with it.
Tsar of DDO
xXCryptoXx
Posts: 5,000
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/5/2014 7:26:04 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/5/2014 7:19:37 PM, YYW wrote:
At 10/2/2014 12:22:48 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
Is taking a foreign language on the college level significantly different than taking one on the high-school level? If so, in what ways?

I took German and Spanish in high school, and I dabbled in Russian and German in college.

Russian is hard. German is a lot like English. More so than Spanish. Spanish is easier to pick up, although I don't remember anything other than how to order food and alcohol.

The primary differences, as I experienced them, is volume. The quantity of work is much greater in college than in high school. I struggled in Russian, and I am not conversational with it.

I only have to take up to Spanish II in highschool, which is what I am taking right now. However, I have considered moving onto spanish III even though I don't need to. Would you recommend doing so?
Nolite Timere
YYW
Posts: 36,289
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/5/2014 7:29:53 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/5/2014 7:26:04 PM, xXCryptoXx wrote:
At 10/5/2014 7:19:37 PM, YYW wrote:
At 10/2/2014 12:22:48 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
Is taking a foreign language on the college level significantly different than taking one on the high-school level? If so, in what ways?

I took German and Spanish in high school, and I dabbled in Russian and German in college.

Russian is hard. German is a lot like English. More so than Spanish. Spanish is easier to pick up, although I don't remember anything other than how to order food and alcohol.

The primary differences, as I experienced them, is volume. The quantity of work is much greater in college than in high school. I struggled in Russian, and I am not conversational with it.

I only have to take up to Spanish II in highschool, which is what I am taking right now. However, I have considered moving onto spanish III even though I don't need to. Would you recommend doing so?

I have spent time in Germany and when I took German in high school I did it with the intent to use it throughout German speaking Europe. (Little did I know how unprepared I would be for Switzerland.)

That said, Spanish is the most useful language in the United States other than English. There is virtually no field where knowing spanish would not enhance your marketability as a job prospect. I wish I had taken it more seriously when I was in high school.

My advice is to learn as much of it as you can, and take it to heart. The spanish language is not only beautiful, it's incredibly useful to know. Spanish (and more broadly Latin) culture is amazing, too, and you will be enhanced as a person to the extent that you immerse yourself in it.
Tsar of DDO
xXCryptoXx
Posts: 5,000
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/5/2014 7:32:53 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/5/2014 7:29:53 PM, YYW wrote:
At 10/5/2014 7:26:04 PM, xXCryptoXx wrote:
At 10/5/2014 7:19:37 PM, YYW wrote:
At 10/2/2014 12:22:48 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
Is taking a foreign language on the college level significantly different than taking one on the high-school level? If so, in what ways?

I took German and Spanish in high school, and I dabbled in Russian and German in college.

Russian is hard. German is a lot like English. More so than Spanish. Spanish is easier to pick up, although I don't remember anything other than how to order food and alcohol.

The primary differences, as I experienced them, is volume. The quantity of work is much greater in college than in high school. I struggled in Russian, and I am not conversational with it.

I only have to take up to Spanish II in highschool, which is what I am taking right now. However, I have considered moving onto spanish III even though I don't need to. Would you recommend doing so?

I have spent time in Germany and when I took German in high school I did it with the intent to use it throughout German speaking Europe. (Little did I know how unprepared I would be for Switzerland.)

That said, Spanish is the most useful language in the United States other than English. There is virtually no field where knowing spanish would not enhance your marketability as a job prospect. I wish I had taken it more seriously when I was in high school.

My advice is to learn as much of it as you can, and take it to heart. The spanish language is not only beautiful, it's incredibly useful to know. Spanish (and more broadly Latin) culture is amazing, too, and you will be enhanced as a person to the extent that you immerse yourself in it.

Legend has it that few have been unsatisfied by the great insight of the almighty YYW
Nolite Timere
YYW
Posts: 36,289
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/5/2014 7:33:55 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/5/2014 7:32:53 PM, xXCryptoXx wrote:
At 10/5/2014 7:29:53 PM, YYW wrote:
At 10/5/2014 7:26:04 PM, xXCryptoXx wrote:
At 10/5/2014 7:19:37 PM, YYW wrote:
At 10/2/2014 12:22:48 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
Is taking a foreign language on the college level significantly different than taking one on the high-school level? If so, in what ways?

I took German and Spanish in high school, and I dabbled in Russian and German in college.

Russian is hard. German is a lot like English. More so than Spanish. Spanish is easier to pick up, although I don't remember anything other than how to order food and alcohol.

The primary differences, as I experienced them, is volume. The quantity of work is much greater in college than in high school. I struggled in Russian, and I am not conversational with it.

I only have to take up to Spanish II in highschool, which is what I am taking right now. However, I have considered moving onto spanish III even though I don't need to. Would you recommend doing so?

I have spent time in Germany and when I took German in high school I did it with the intent to use it throughout German speaking Europe. (Little did I know how unprepared I would be for Switzerland.)

That said, Spanish is the most useful language in the United States other than English. There is virtually no field where knowing spanish would not enhance your marketability as a job prospect. I wish I had taken it more seriously when I was in high school.

My advice is to learn as much of it as you can, and take it to heart. The spanish language is not only beautiful, it's incredibly useful to know. Spanish (and more broadly Latin) culture is amazing, too, and you will be enhanced as a person to the extent that you immerse yourself in it.

Legend has it that few have been unsatisfied by the great insight of the almighty YYW

Only God is almighty, Crypto. Even still, I try to help where I can.
Tsar of DDO
xXCryptoXx
Posts: 5,000
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/5/2014 7:36:07 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/5/2014 7:33:55 PM, YYW wrote:
At 10/5/2014 7:32:53 PM, xXCryptoXx wrote:
At 10/5/2014 7:29:53 PM, YYW wrote:
At 10/5/2014 7:26:04 PM, xXCryptoXx wrote:
At 10/5/2014 7:19:37 PM, YYW wrote:
At 10/2/2014 12:22:48 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
Is taking a foreign language on the college level significantly different than taking one on the high-school level? If so, in what ways?

I took German and Spanish in high school, and I dabbled in Russian and German in college.

Russian is hard. German is a lot like English. More so than Spanish. Spanish is easier to pick up, although I don't remember anything other than how to order food and alcohol.

The primary differences, as I experienced them, is volume. The quantity of work is much greater in college than in high school. I struggled in Russian, and I am not conversational with it.

I only have to take up to Spanish II in highschool, which is what I am taking right now. However, I have considered moving onto spanish III even though I don't need to. Would you recommend doing so?

I have spent time in Germany and when I took German in high school I did it with the intent to use it throughout German speaking Europe. (Little did I know how unprepared I would be for Switzerland.)

That said, Spanish is the most useful language in the United States other than English. There is virtually no field where knowing spanish would not enhance your marketability as a job prospect. I wish I had taken it more seriously when I was in high school.

My advice is to learn as much of it as you can, and take it to heart. The spanish language is not only beautiful, it's incredibly useful to know. Spanish (and more broadly Latin) culture is amazing, too, and you will be enhanced as a person to the extent that you immerse yourself in it.

Legend has it that few have been unsatisfied by the great insight of the almighty YYW

Only God is almighty, Crypto. Even still, I try to help where I can.

It'll probably be difficult, but I have enough interest in Spanish that I would like to push myself to become fluent in it. It would be a shame to ignore its plethora of benefits. Also, my mom's family is hispanic; they'll be so proud of me.
Nolite Timere
Mirza
Posts: 16,992
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/5/2014 7:40:20 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
If you merely want to learn a new language, there are better ways than college to do that. One is narrowing down creative learning by choosing college over options like study groups that are formed for the purpose of learning a language. Continually talking in a certain language, watching movies, listening to audio books [etc] will all help in the progression significantly.

Germanic languages like German and Danish would be easier to learn for an English-speaker than most other languages. Spanish doesn't seem quite hard either. Here's a list of languages ranked from easiest to hardest for English-speakers to learn: [http://www.effectivelanguagelearning.com...]
Defro
Posts: 847
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/5/2014 8:02:44 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 10/5/2014 7:26:04 PM, xXCryptoXx wrote:
At 10/5/2014 7:19:37 PM, YYW wrote:
At 10/2/2014 12:22:48 AM, bossyburrito wrote:
Is taking a foreign language on the college level significantly different than taking one on the high-school level? If so, in what ways?

I took German and Spanish in high school, and I dabbled in Russian and German in college.

Russian is hard. German is a lot like English. More so than Spanish. Spanish is easier to pick up, although I don't remember anything other than how to order food and alcohol.

The primary differences, as I experienced them, is volume. The quantity of work is much greater in college than in high school. I struggled in Russian, and I am not conversational with it.

I only have to take up to Spanish II in highschool, which is what I am taking right now. However, I have considered moving onto spanish III even though I don't need to. Would you recommend doing so?

Do it. Idk about your school, but Spanish 3 in my school was so chill. After Spanish 2, we got the basics down, so the teacher just lets us chill and speak Spanish to each other. And we find excuses to go on field trips to Mexican restaurants and stuff.