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Pretty pretty flowers

Ore_Ele
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1/18/2015 2:08:13 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
So I am in the middle of moving into my first home (we recieves the keys on Friday and did most of the move in yesterday, but have to the end of the month to fully move out of the old place) and there are two places that I've identified where I want to put some flower beds. One is along the north facing side of the house (so they will need to be shade flowers) and the other is along the south side of the house (so they will need to be sunlight flowers). The beds are only going to be about 12 inches wide (but 6-15 feet long) and I don't know if I want to but down a liner (which would only give the roots about 6-8 inches of depths, but would help against weeds). Anyone know what flowers would grow best? The hardiness grade if my area is 8b.
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ESocialBookworm
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1/18/2015 2:10:38 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/18/2015 2:08:13 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
So I am in the middle of moving into my first home (we recieves the keys on Friday and did most of the move in yesterday, but have to the end of the month to fully move out of the old place)
CONGRATS!
and there are two places that I've identified where I want to put some flower beds. One is along the north facing side of the house (so they will need to be shade flowers) and the other is along the south side of the house (so they will need to be sunlight flowers). The beds are only going to be about 12 inches wide (but 6-15 feet long) and I don't know if I want to but down a liner (which would only give the roots about 6-8 inches of depths, but would help against weeds). Anyone know what flowers would grow best? The hardiness grade if my area is 8b.
No idea, but I'm sure you'll find someone. :)
Maybe sweattea knows...
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AnDoctuir
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1/18/2015 2:22:20 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I also have no idea, but you are living the dream, Ore_Ele.

All the best in your floral choices, mate.
1harderthanyouthink
Posts: 13,102
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1/18/2015 2:26:48 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I always like the sight of good gardening and landscaping...I'm not knowledgeable though...maybe that's something I'll get into later in life...
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bsh1
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1/18/2015 3:14:34 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Congrats about moving into your first home :) I wish I could give you some advice re: your flower beds...but I have no clue about plants.
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Maikuru
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1/18/2015 3:18:27 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I'm a big fan of the public television shows This Old House and Ask This Old House. One of the hosts specializes in all things garden and flowers. I would recommend checking out their websites and shows if they air in your region. They also obviously offer lots of advice concerning house upkeep, repairs, and money-saving practices.
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Ore_Ele
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1/18/2015 3:52:29 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/18/2015 3:18:27 PM, Maikuru wrote:
I'm a big fan of the public television shows This Old House and Ask This Old House. One of the hosts specializes in all things garden and flowers. I would recommend checking out their websites and shows if they air in your region. They also obviously offer lots of advice concerning house upkeep, repairs, and money-saving practices.

Will do, thanks!
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Skepsikyma
Posts: 8,286
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1/18/2015 6:17:32 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/18/2015 2:08:13 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
So I am in the middle of moving into my first home (we recieves the keys on Friday and did most of the move in yesterday, but have to the end of the month to fully move out of the old place) and there are two places that I've identified where I want to put some flower beds. One is along the north facing side of the house (so they will need to be shade flowers) and the other is along the south side of the house (so they will need to be sunlight flowers). The beds are only going to be about 12 inches wide (but 6-15 feet long) and I don't know if I want to but down a liner (which would only give the roots about 6-8 inches of depths, but would help against weeds). Anyone know what flowers would grow best? The hardiness grade if my area is 8b.

I'm a botanist and avid garden in zone 6. But I do deal pretty extensively in tropicals which I dig our every year. Couple more questions:

What's your soil like? Clay, sandy, or loamy? Any stunted growth or yellowing of the natural flora?

Is it windy, and are you near the ocean? Salt spray can have a big effect.

How wet or dry is the area, and how is the drainage?

Lasty, are you looking for woody plants, or just herbaceous? Are grasses a no go? What about shrubs?
"The Collectivist experiment is thoroughly suited (in appearance at least) to the Capitalist society which it proposes to replace. It works with the existing machinery of Capitalism, talks and thinks in the existing terms of Capitalism, appeals to just those appetites which Capitalism has aroused, and ridicules as fantastic and unheard-of just those things in society the memory of which Capitalism has killed among men wherever the blight of it has spread."
- Hilaire Belloc -
Ore_Ele
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1/18/2015 6:28:05 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/18/2015 6:17:32 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 1/18/2015 2:08:13 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
So I am in the middle of moving into my first home (we recieves the keys on Friday and did most of the move in yesterday, but have to the end of the month to fully move out of the old place) and there are two places that I've identified where I want to put some flower beds. One is along the north facing side of the house (so they will need to be shade flowers) and the other is along the south side of the house (so they will need to be sunlight flowers). The beds are only going to be about 12 inches wide (but 6-15 feet long) and I don't know if I want to but down a liner (which would only give the roots about 6-8 inches of depths, but would help against weeds). Anyone know what flowers would grow best? The hardiness grade if my area is 8b.

I'm a botanist and avid garden in zone 6. But I do deal pretty extensively in tropicals which I dig our every year. Couple more questions:

What's your soil like? Clay, sandy, or loamy? Any stunted growth or yellowing of the natural flora?

Is it windy, and are you near the ocean? Salt spray can have a big effect.

How wet or dry is the area, and how is the drainage?

Lasty, are you looking for woody plants, or just herbaceous? Are grasses a no go? What about shrubs?

We are in the Portland area, so lots of rain, but 80 miles from the coast. Right now, we are just looking at some beds near the house, so nothing too big. The only "red flag" (and not sure if it is a red flag) is that about 1/3 of the lawn is moss rather than grass.
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"
Skepsikyma
Posts: 8,286
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1/18/2015 6:48:20 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/18/2015 6:28:05 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
At 1/18/2015 6:17:32 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 1/18/2015 2:08:13 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
So I am in the middle of moving into my first home (we recieves the keys on Friday and did most of the move in yesterday, but have to the end of the month to fully move out of the old place) and there are two places that I've identified where I want to put some flower beds. One is along the north facing side of the house (so they will need to be shade flowers) and the other is along the south side of the house (so they will need to be sunlight flowers). The beds are only going to be about 12 inches wide (but 6-15 feet long) and I don't know if I want to but down a liner (which would only give the roots about 6-8 inches of depths, but would help against weeds). Anyone know what flowers would grow best? The hardiness grade if my area is 8b.

I'm a botanist and avid garden in zone 6. But I do deal pretty extensively in tropicals which I dig our every year. Couple more questions:

What's your soil like? Clay, sandy, or loamy? Any stunted growth or yellowing of the natural flora?

Is it windy, and are you near the ocean? Salt spray can have a big effect.

How wet or dry is the area, and how is the drainage?

Lasty, are you looking for woody plants, or just herbaceous? Are grasses a no go? What about shrubs?

We are in the Portland area, so lots of rain, but 80 miles from the coast. Right now, we are just looking at some beds near the house, so nothing too big. The only "red flag" (and not sure if it is a red flag) is that about 1/3 of the lawn is moss rather than grass.

The moss could be because of acid. It also could just be because it's Portland, though. I usually picture southeast when I hear zone 8, lol, so this calls for a different kind of advice than what I had planned, as zones are based on how cold it gets, not how hot, and looking at your temp chart you're actually cooler than my area in the summer. So, rainy, but rarely freezing. Do you have clay soil? I recall reading somewhere that clay is common in Portland. That makes it a bitch to garden, but I live in an area which is famous for both antique clay tile manufactories and gardens, so I know all of the tricks to circumvent that if it's the case.

I would recommend ferns (ostrich ferns are great) and hostas for shade perennials, to fill in areas. Between them you could do impatiens (which will LOVE your area, so long as they are shaded. They thrive on moisture). Lungwort is also an option, as is Jacob's Ladder. I personally love lungwort, because it blooms with these really neat two-colored flowers in the spring, then offers interesting foliage for the rest of the year. It's one of my favorite shade plants. Anemone, or greek windflower, also works, as do celandine and lamium. Lamium is a groundcover though, so it spreads rapidly.

For sun, I need to know about the soil. Clay soil is very tightly packed, with particles which are shaped like microscopic books, so that it binds up nutrients and water so tightly with capillary pressure that the plant's roots cannot pull it away. This makes it dangerous when the sun comes out and the ground dries up.

Shade plants:

Lamium: https://sp.yimg.com...
Lungwort: http://www.statelykitsch.com...
Ostrich Fern: https://sp.yimg.com...
Japanese Painted Fern: https://sp.yimg.com...
Impatiens: https://sp.yimg.com...
Jacob's Ladder: https://www.grimmsgardens.com...
Anemone: http://1.bp.blogspot.com...
Celandine: https://sp.yimg.com...
Hostas: https://sp.yimg.com...
"The Collectivist experiment is thoroughly suited (in appearance at least) to the Capitalist society which it proposes to replace. It works with the existing machinery of Capitalism, talks and thinks in the existing terms of Capitalism, appeals to just those appetites which Capitalism has aroused, and ridicules as fantastic and unheard-of just those things in society the memory of which Capitalism has killed among men wherever the blight of it has spread."
- Hilaire Belloc -
RevNge
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1/18/2015 6:50:23 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/18/2015 2:08:13 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
So I am in the middle of moving into my first home (we recieves the keys on Friday and did most of the move in yesterday, but have to the end of the month to fully move out of the old place) and there are two places that I've identified where I want to put some flower beds. One is along the north facing side of the house (so they will need to be shade flowers) and the other is along the south side of the house (so they will need to be sunlight flowers). The beds are only going to be about 12 inches wide (but 6-15 feet long) and I don't know if I want to but down a liner (which would only give the roots about 6-8 inches of depths, but would help against weeds). Anyone know what flowers would grow best? The hardiness grade if my area is 8b.

*plans on riding a bike over Ore's flower beds*
Skepsikyma
Posts: 8,286
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1/18/2015 6:52:38 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Oh, and you simply must have bleeding hearts. I completely forgot about that one. They're just so stunning in the spring.

http://gardeninacity.files.wordpress.com...
"The Collectivist experiment is thoroughly suited (in appearance at least) to the Capitalist society which it proposes to replace. It works with the existing machinery of Capitalism, talks and thinks in the existing terms of Capitalism, appeals to just those appetites which Capitalism has aroused, and ridicules as fantastic and unheard-of just those things in society the memory of which Capitalism has killed among men wherever the blight of it has spread."
- Hilaire Belloc -
Skepsikyma
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1/18/2015 7:03:30 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/18/2015 6:50:23 PM, RevNge wrote:
At 1/18/2015 2:08:13 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
So I am in the middle of moving into my first home (we recieves the keys on Friday and did most of the move in yesterday, but have to the end of the month to fully move out of the old place) and there are two places that I've identified where I want to put some flower beds. One is along the north facing side of the house (so they will need to be shade flowers) and the other is along the south side of the house (so they will need to be sunlight flowers). The beds are only going to be about 12 inches wide (but 6-15 feet long) and I don't know if I want to but down a liner (which would only give the roots about 6-8 inches of depths, but would help against weeds). Anyone know what flowers would grow best? The hardiness grade if my area is 8b.

*plans on riding a bike over Ore's flower beds*

You MONSTER.
"The Collectivist experiment is thoroughly suited (in appearance at least) to the Capitalist society which it proposes to replace. It works with the existing machinery of Capitalism, talks and thinks in the existing terms of Capitalism, appeals to just those appetites which Capitalism has aroused, and ridicules as fantastic and unheard-of just those things in society the memory of which Capitalism has killed among men wherever the blight of it has spread."
- Hilaire Belloc -
RevNge
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1/18/2015 7:05:39 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/18/2015 7:03:30 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 1/18/2015 6:50:23 PM, RevNge wrote:
At 1/18/2015 2:08:13 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
So I am in the middle of moving into my first home (we recieves the keys on Friday and did most of the move in yesterday, but have to the end of the month to fully move out of the old place) and there are two places that I've identified where I want to put some flower beds. One is along the north facing side of the house (so they will need to be shade flowers) and the other is along the south side of the house (so they will need to be sunlight flowers). The beds are only going to be about 12 inches wide (but 6-15 feet long) and I don't know if I want to but down a liner (which would only give the roots about 6-8 inches of depths, but would help against weeds). Anyone know what flowers would grow best? The hardiness grade if my area is 8b.

*plans on riding a bike over Ore's flower beds*

You MONSTER.

Either that, or do that thing with the magnifying glass and the sun. ;D
Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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1/18/2015 7:11:10 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/18/2015 6:48:20 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 1/18/2015 6:28:05 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
At 1/18/2015 6:17:32 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 1/18/2015 2:08:13 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
So I am in the middle of moving into my first home (we recieves the keys on Friday and did most of the move in yesterday, but have to the end of the month to fully move out of the old place) and there are two places that I've identified where I want to put some flower beds. One is along the north facing side of the house (so they will need to be shade flowers) and the other is along the south side of the house (so they will need to be sunlight flowers). The beds are only going to be about 12 inches wide (but 6-15 feet long) and I don't know if I want to but down a liner (which would only give the roots about 6-8 inches of depths, but would help against weeds). Anyone know what flowers would grow best? The hardiness grade if my area is 8b.

I'm a botanist and avid garden in zone 6. But I do deal pretty extensively in tropicals which I dig our every year. Couple more questions:

What's your soil like? Clay, sandy, or loamy? Any stunted growth or yellowing of the natural flora?

Is it windy, and are you near the ocean? Salt spray can have a big effect.

How wet or dry is the area, and how is the drainage?

Lasty, are you looking for woody plants, or just herbaceous? Are grasses a no go? What about shrubs?

We are in the Portland area, so lots of rain, but 80 miles from the coast. Right now, we are just looking at some beds near the house, so nothing too big. The only "red flag" (and not sure if it is a red flag) is that about 1/3 of the lawn is moss rather than grass.

The moss could be because of acid. It also could just be because it's Portland, though. I usually picture southeast when I hear zone 8, lol, so this calls for a different kind of advice than what I had planned, as zones are based on how cold it gets, not how hot, and looking at your temp chart you're actually cooler than my area in the summer. So, rainy, but rarely freezing. Do you have clay soil? I recall reading somewhere that clay is common in Portland. That makes it a bitch to garden, but I live in an area which is famous for both antique clay tile manufactories and gardens, so I know all of the tricks to circumvent that if it's the case.

I would recommend ferns (ostrich ferns are great) and hostas for shade perennials, to fill in areas. Between them you could do impatiens (which will LOVE your area, so long as they are shaded. They thrive on moisture). Lungwort is also an option, as is Jacob's Ladder. I personally love lungwort, because it blooms with these really neat two-colored flowers in the spring, then offers interesting foliage for the rest of the year. It's one of my favorite shade plants. Anemone, or greek windflower, also works, as do celandine and lamium. Lamium is a groundcover though, so it spreads rapidly.

For sun, I need to know about the soil. Clay soil is very tightly packed, with particles which are shaped like microscopic books, so that it binds up nutrients and water so tightly with capillary pressure that the plant's roots cannot pull it away. This makes it dangerous when the sun comes out and the ground dries up.

Shade plants:

Lamium: https://sp.yimg.com...
Lungwort: http://www.statelykitsch.com...
Ostrich Fern: https://sp.yimg.com...
Japanese Painted Fern: https://sp.yimg.com...
Impatiens: https://sp.yimg.com...
Jacob's Ladder: https://www.grimmsgardens.com...
Anemone: http://1.bp.blogspot.com...
Celandine: https://sp.yimg.com...
Hostas: https://sp.yimg.com...

Ferns should do fine, as there are already a bunch of them in the area. For soil, I am not sure. It doesn't seem very clayish, but I am only about 10 miles from the Dundee Hills, which is where most of the famous Oregon wines are grown and I know they have very clayish soil (Oregon tried to get the Dundee clay to become the states official soil a few years ago).

I will check when I get home. If you want to pm me your email, I can send pictures.
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Skepsikyma
Posts: 8,286
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1/18/2015 8:09:33 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/18/2015 7:11:10 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
Ferns should do fine, as there are already a bunch of them in the area. For soil, I am not sure. It doesn't seem very clayish, but I am only about 10 miles from the Dundee Hills, which is where most of the famous Oregon wines are grown and I know they have very clayish soil (Oregon tried to get the Dundee clay to become the states official soil a few years ago).

I will check when I get home. If you want to pm me your email, I can send pictures.

Just go to this website:
http://websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov...

Under quick navigation, go to soil survey area and select your state and county. Then select the bullet point that pops up under that, check the soil surveys box, and hit 'Set AOI'. Then either enter your address (including town) or coordinates under the appropriate tab, and the map should jump to your house. Hit the soil map tab, and a map that looks like an orange jigsaw puzzle should come up. Zoom in if you need to, and match the codes in the jigsaw piece which includes your house to the list of soils on the left.

For example, my house is split between:

Abbottstown silt loam, 3 to 8 percent slopes and Readington silt loam, 3 to 8 percent slopes

Those are both good soils, though they can still be amended with organic matter. If I have the soil type I can tell just about everything about your environment.
"The Collectivist experiment is thoroughly suited (in appearance at least) to the Capitalist society which it proposes to replace. It works with the existing machinery of Capitalism, talks and thinks in the existing terms of Capitalism, appeals to just those appetites which Capitalism has aroused, and ridicules as fantastic and unheard-of just those things in society the memory of which Capitalism has killed among men wherever the blight of it has spread."
- Hilaire Belloc -
Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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1/18/2015 8:56:46 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/18/2015 8:09:33 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 1/18/2015 7:11:10 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
Ferns should do fine, as there are already a bunch of them in the area. For soil, I am not sure. It doesn't seem very clayish, but I am only about 10 miles from the Dundee Hills, which is where most of the famous Oregon wines are grown and I know they have very clayish soil (Oregon tried to get the Dundee clay to become the states official soil a few years ago).

I will check when I get home. If you want to pm me your email, I can send pictures.

Just go to this website:
http://websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov...

Under quick navigation, go to soil survey area and select your state and county. Then select the bullet point that pops up under that, check the soil surveys box, and hit 'Set AOI'. Then either enter your address (including town) or coordinates under the appropriate tab, and the map should jump to your house. Hit the soil map tab, and a map that looks like an orange jigsaw puzzle should come up. Zoom in if you need to, and match the codes in the jigsaw piece which includes your house to the list of soils on the left.

For example, my house is split between:

Abbottstown silt loam, 3 to 8 percent slopes and Readington silt loam, 3 to 8 percent slopes

Those are both good soils, though they can still be amended with organic matter. If I have the soil type I can tell just about everything about your environment.

I am not getting this figured out on my phone. I'll try once we get the Internet moved over and can get on my computer.
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"
Skepsikyma
Posts: 8,286
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1/18/2015 9:04:05 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/18/2015 8:56:46 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
At 1/18/2015 8:09:33 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 1/18/2015 7:11:10 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
Ferns should do fine, as there are already a bunch of them in the area. For soil, I am not sure. It doesn't seem very clayish, but I am only about 10 miles from the Dundee Hills, which is where most of the famous Oregon wines are grown and I know they have very clayish soil (Oregon tried to get the Dundee clay to become the states official soil a few years ago).

I will check when I get home. If you want to pm me your email, I can send pictures.

Just go to this website:
http://websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov...

Under quick navigation, go to soil survey area and select your state and county. Then select the bullet point that pops up under that, check the soil surveys box, and hit 'Set AOI'. Then either enter your address (including town) or coordinates under the appropriate tab, and the map should jump to your house. Hit the soil map tab, and a map that looks like an orange jigsaw puzzle should come up. Zoom in if you need to, and match the codes in the jigsaw piece which includes your house to the list of soils on the left.

For example, my house is split between:

Abbottstown silt loam, 3 to 8 percent slopes and Readington silt loam, 3 to 8 percent slopes

Those are both good soils, though they can still be amended with organic matter. If I have the soil type I can tell just about everything about your environment.

I am not getting this figured out on my phone. I'll try once we get the Internet moved over and can get on my computer.

Awesome. And I knew that Dundee Hills sounded familiar; that's where Argyle is located. They make a fantastic Pinot Noir.
"The Collectivist experiment is thoroughly suited (in appearance at least) to the Capitalist society which it proposes to replace. It works with the existing machinery of Capitalism, talks and thinks in the existing terms of Capitalism, appeals to just those appetites which Capitalism has aroused, and ridicules as fantastic and unheard-of just those things in society the memory of which Capitalism has killed among men wherever the blight of it has spread."
- Hilaire Belloc -
Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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1/18/2015 9:06:58 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/18/2015 9:04:05 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 1/18/2015 8:56:46 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
At 1/18/2015 8:09:33 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 1/18/2015 7:11:10 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
Ferns should do fine, as there are already a bunch of them in the area. For soil, I am not sure. It doesn't seem very clayish, but I am only about 10 miles from the Dundee Hills, which is where most of the famous Oregon wines are grown and I know they have very clayish soil (Oregon tried to get the Dundee clay to become the states official soil a few years ago).

I will check when I get home. If you want to pm me your email, I can send pictures.

Just go to this website:
http://websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov...

Under quick navigation, go to soil survey area and select your state and county. Then select the bullet point that pops up under that, check the soil surveys box, and hit 'Set AOI'. Then either enter your address (including town) or coordinates under the appropriate tab, and the map should jump to your house. Hit the soil map tab, and a map that looks like an orange jigsaw puzzle should come up. Zoom in if you need to, and match the codes in the jigsaw piece which includes your house to the list of soils on the left.

For example, my house is split between:

Abbottstown silt loam, 3 to 8 percent slopes and Readington silt loam, 3 to 8 percent slopes

Those are both good soils, though they can still be amended with organic matter. If I have the soil type I can tell just about everything about your environment.

I am not getting this figured out on my phone. I'll try once we get the Internet moved over and can get on my computer.

Awesome. And I knew that Dundee Hills sounded familiar; that's where Argyle is located. They make a fantastic Pinot Noir.

There are countless wineries in the area that make great Pinots. That is what our grapes are best for, white wines... Not so much (though the Pinot Gris is decent). We're actually trying to convince the land owner to grow some grapes, she owns a great south facing hill).
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"
Skepsikyma
Posts: 8,286
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1/18/2015 9:12:47 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/18/2015 9:06:58 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
At 1/18/2015 9:04:05 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 1/18/2015 8:56:46 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
At 1/18/2015 8:09:33 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 1/18/2015 7:11:10 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
Ferns should do fine, as there are already a bunch of them in the area. For soil, I am not sure. It doesn't seem very clayish, but I am only about 10 miles from the Dundee Hills, which is where most of the famous Oregon wines are grown and I know they have very clayish soil (Oregon tried to get the Dundee clay to become the states official soil a few years ago).

I will check when I get home. If you want to pm me your email, I can send pictures.

Just go to this website:
http://websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov...

Under quick navigation, go to soil survey area and select your state and county. Then select the bullet point that pops up under that, check the soil surveys box, and hit 'Set AOI'. Then either enter your address (including town) or coordinates under the appropriate tab, and the map should jump to your house. Hit the soil map tab, and a map that looks like an orange jigsaw puzzle should come up. Zoom in if you need to, and match the codes in the jigsaw piece which includes your house to the list of soils on the left.

For example, my house is split between:

Abbottstown silt loam, 3 to 8 percent slopes and Readington silt loam, 3 to 8 percent slopes

Those are both good soils, though they can still be amended with organic matter. If I have the soil type I can tell just about everything about your environment.

I am not getting this figured out on my phone. I'll try once we get the Internet moved over and can get on my computer.

Awesome. And I knew that Dundee Hills sounded familiar; that's where Argyle is located. They make a fantastic Pinot Noir.

There are countless wineries in the area that make great Pinots. That is what our grapes are best for, white wines... Not so much (though the Pinot Gris is decent). We're actually trying to convince the land owner to grow some grapes, she owns a great south facing hill).

Nice. I work in the liquor store for a part time job, so if there's ever a tasting going on when my shift ends I drop by and hit up what they have to offer. I've always wanted to try Pinot Gris, but they haven't offered any for tasting yet; maybe I'll grab a Willamette one the next time I need to pair with seafood.
"The Collectivist experiment is thoroughly suited (in appearance at least) to the Capitalist society which it proposes to replace. It works with the existing machinery of Capitalism, talks and thinks in the existing terms of Capitalism, appeals to just those appetites which Capitalism has aroused, and ridicules as fantastic and unheard-of just those things in society the memory of which Capitalism has killed among men wherever the blight of it has spread."
- Hilaire Belloc -
Ore_Ele
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1/19/2015 2:55:29 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/18/2015 9:04:05 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 1/18/2015 8:56:46 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
At 1/18/2015 8:09:33 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 1/18/2015 7:11:10 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
Ferns should do fine, as there are already a bunch of them in the area. For soil, I am not sure. It doesn't seem very clayish, but I am only about 10 miles from the Dundee Hills, which is where most of the famous Oregon wines are grown and I know they have very clayish soil (Oregon tried to get the Dundee clay to become the states official soil a few years ago).

I will check when I get home. If you want to pm me your email, I can send pictures.

Just go to this website:
http://websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov...

Under quick navigation, go to soil survey area and select your state and county. Then select the bullet point that pops up under that, check the soil surveys box, and hit 'Set AOI'. Then either enter your address (including town) or coordinates under the appropriate tab, and the map should jump to your house. Hit the soil map tab, and a map that looks like an orange jigsaw puzzle should come up. Zoom in if you need to, and match the codes in the jigsaw piece which includes your house to the list of soils on the left.

For example, my house is split between:

Abbottstown silt loam, 3 to 8 percent slopes and Readington silt loam, 3 to 8 percent slopes

Those are both good soils, though they can still be amended with organic matter. If I have the soil type I can tell just about everything about your environment.

I am not getting this figured out on my phone. I'll try once we get the Internet moved over and can get on my computer.

Awesome. And I knew that Dundee Hills sounded familiar; that's where Argyle is located. They make a fantastic Pinot Noir.

Jiminy Cricket, just got about half the raking done. The yard is a war zone. Blackberry vines have runners under the leaves about 15 feet in (and roots are down on them) all around the west and north fence.
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"
Ore_Ele
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1/19/2015 2:57:24 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
And pretty sure the soil is clay. It rained a ton the last few days but today has been dry. The soil under the leaves (there is a lot less grass than I thought) is very soft clay.
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Skepsikyma
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1/20/2015 10:28:46 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 1/19/2015 2:57:24 PM, Ore_Ele wrote:
Jiminy Cricket, just got about half the raking done. The yard is a war zone. Blackberry vines have runners under the leaves about 15 feet in (and roots are down on them) all around the west and north fence.

Ooh, they may be a bit of a bitch to get out at first, but you'll have a steady supply. Aren't black raspberry farms big in the Willamette Valley as well?

And pretty sure the soil is clay. It rained a ton the last few days but today has been dry. The soil under the leaves (there is a lot less grass than I thought) is very soft clay.

Alright, then I would recommend getting in a bunch of humus, and mixing it in to the first ~1/2 foot of soil until it's more dark brown and spongy. If you have any half-decayed leaves available, perhaps in forests or left over from raking up your yard, mixing them in will also help with water retention. For the next few years (or indefinitely, up to you), instead of mulching or using plastic, buy mushroom soil/compost from a garden center (many sell it in bulk) and spread it around your plants. Basically, it's a special compost mix created for growing mushrooms. Natural exothermic decomposition heats the pile up to the point where it kills any weed seeds, and then it is used to grow mushrooms in damp, dark warehouses. Once the mushrooms are harvested the compost is useless to the grower, and is sold to garden centers to be resold to gardeners. It is incredibly rich in organic matter, and will help build a nice layer of rich topsoil. It also keeps down weeds while, in my opinion, looking better than mulch. One cubic yard covers about 100 square feet to a depth of two inches. If you do this you ALSO won't even really have to fertilize after a year or two if you don't want too.

For your sun garden:

Echinacea is a must. Also known as purple coneflower, it blooms for months at a time, requires next to no maintenance, is not at all picky, comes back year after year, and attracts swallowtail butterflies by the boatload. There are some weird flashy ones out there, but I've found them to be much less hardy than the native variety that I rely on. Plus it's just stunning. http://4.bp.blogspot.com...

If you have the height clearance, I also recommend sunflowers. They're pretty low maintenance, reseed, and attract goldfinches in the fall.

Now, this next one can be touchy, but are well worth the effort if you're willing to put the work in. Delphinium. This is a prima donna of a plant, it dies if you look at it funny in some locations, and grows like a weed in a few rare spots that I've yet to find. But it is beyond gorgeous. It also must be staked. http://upload.wikimedia.org...

If you want a similar, if less awe-inspiring effect, and are too lazy for delphiniums (like myself), there are always Larkspur, which I call 'ghetto delphinium.' These just reseed all over every year at my house, I don't have to do anything to keep them going, and the put on quite a show in June-July. http://4.bp.blogspot.com...

Don't plant Morning Glories. Ever. For any reason. They are f*cking evil, and you will never get rid of them.

Foxglove is pretty, and deadly toxic, so maybe not if you have any small children or instinct-challenged animals. One leaf, ingested, can stop a human's heart. Monkshood is in the same boat. Foxgloves may need to be staked.

Monkshood: https://sp.yimg.com...
Foxglove: https://sp.yimg.com...

Other easy ones are Sweet William (https://sp.yimg.com...), Phlox (https://sp.yimg.com...), Blazing Star (https://sp.yimg.com...), and Black-eyed Susan (https://sp.yimg.com...).

If you want something BIG, go for Hollyhocks. (https://sp.yimg.com...)

And one of my favorites: Beebalm, Bergamot (the purple one), or Oswego Tea. You can make a delicious tea out of these leavers, they bloom for months, spread, and just create a lovely block of color.

https://sp.yimg.com...
http://www.gardensonline.com.au...

Finally, if you want a vine, you could go with clematis or honeysuckle.

There are more types of Clematis than you can possibly dream of: https://images.search.yahoo.com...

And, a beautiful (and tasty) coral honeysuckle: https://sp.yimg.com...
"The Collectivist experiment is thoroughly suited (in appearance at least) to the Capitalist society which it proposes to replace. It works with the existing machinery of Capitalism, talks and thinks in the existing terms of Capitalism, appeals to just those appetites which Capitalism has aroused, and ridicules as fantastic and unheard-of just those things in society the memory of which Capitalism has killed among men wherever the blight of it has spread."
- Hilaire Belloc -
Ore_Ele
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1/20/2015 10:56:29 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Lol, we may sell black berries to the rest if the country but they are EVERYWHERE here, lol.
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"