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Am I the only person that has waking dreams?

R0b1Billion
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5/12/2015 8:05:03 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I'm 34, and I've been having them since I was perhaps 20.

Before I go on, I want to ask people: do you find things familiar in the dream world even though you've never encountered them before? Can you imagine yourself in a completely new place, around new people, and feel like you know them? That happens to me in my dreams, and that is the sensation I get during a waking dream - it's sort of like I'm being reminded of something that I've never experienced before. They are usually short, I have lots of little ones but I get a few big ones during the day that are pretty distracting ("little"=a half second, "big"= 2-3 seconds). I can go months without experiencing them at all, and sometimes (often after stressful episodes or if I don't get enough R.E.M. sleep) I can get them constantly throughout the week.

During my 20s, they were almost completely negative. By that I mean the thought was benign enough, but afterwards my emotional state would drop to zero. That may sound confusing, so let me explain that you, right now, are experiencing a steady supply of endorphins to keep you happy. You may feel happy right now, you may feel somewhat in a bad mood, but even if you are in a really bad mood, you are STILL enjoying a fair amount of happiness. I only know this because sometimes my episodes are accompanied by a dramatic drop-off in these endorphins, and it is a horrific feeling you will not know in your lifetime unless you have an acute psychological condition that causes it (like depression) or else you do what I've done when I was younger, and take a bunch of cocaine and then wait for the come-down. Cocaine floods you with positive chemicals, but afterwards the brain has a severe deficit and although there is no actual pain in the classical sense, simply the absence of the good chemicals is a practically-unbearable feeling. Anyway, that's how I feel sometimes after one of these, perhaps it has to do with my mind thinking I am asleep, in which case endorphins would probably not be needed. Today I'm having the little episodes very frequently (dozens today) with no acutely-negative side-effects, other than distraction.

One more detail is that the actual idea/dream/memory that suddenly surfaces during these episodes always disappears and I can't remember it. There's some sort of wall there; I experience the memory and then it is stripped from me even if I concentrate on keeping it.

Has anybody heard of anything like this before?
Beliefs in a nutshell:
- The Ends never justify the Means.
- Objectivity is secondary to subjectivity.
- The War on Drugs is the worst policy in the U.S.
- Most people worship technology as a religion.
- Computers will never become sentient.
Lee001
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5/12/2015 9:14:26 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/12/2015 8:05:03 PM, R0b1Billion wrote:
I'm 34, and I've been having them since I was perhaps 20.

Before I go on, I want to ask people: do you find things familiar in the dream world even though you've never encountered them before? Can you imagine yourself in a completely new place, around new people, and feel like you know them? That happens to me in my dreams, and that is the sensation I get during a waking dream - it's sort of like I'm being reminded of something that I've never experienced before. They are usually short, I have lots of little ones but I get a few big ones during the day that are pretty distracting ("little"=a half second, "big"= 2-3 seconds). I can go months without experiencing them at all, and sometimes (often after stressful episodes or if I don't get enough R.E.M. sleep) I can get them constantly throughout the week.

During my 20s, they were almost completely negative. By that I mean the thought was benign enough, but afterwards my emotional state would drop to zero. That may sound confusing, so let me explain that you, right now, are experiencing a steady supply of endorphins to keep you happy. You may feel happy right now, you may feel somewhat in a bad mood, but even if you are in a really bad mood, you are STILL enjoying a fair amount of happiness. I only know this because sometimes my episodes are accompanied by a dramatic drop-off in these endorphins, and it is a horrific feeling you will not know in your lifetime unless you have an acute psychological condition that causes it (like depression) or else you do what I've done when I was younger, and take a bunch of cocaine and then wait for the come-down. Cocaine floods you with positive chemicals, but afterwards the brain has a severe deficit and although there is no actual pain in the classical sense, simply the absence of the good chemicals is a practically-unbearable feeling. Anyway, that's how I feel sometimes after one of these, perhaps it has to do with my mind thinking I am asleep, in which case endorphins would probably not be needed. Today I'm having the little episodes very frequently (dozens today) with no acutely-negative side-effects, other than distraction.

One more detail is that the actual idea/dream/memory that suddenly surfaces during these episodes always disappears and I can't remember it. There's some sort of wall there; I experience the memory and then it is stripped from me even if I concentrate on keeping it.

Has anybody heard of anything like this before?

That's weird..I never have had "waking" dreams. I have allot of "D"j" Vu" dreams. Read more here: https://www.psychologytoday.com...

Sometimes, I will be dreaming, and its a nightmare and I wake up suddenly and gasp, its weird, my family members have seen it. Sometimes as well, I think I'm asleep, but I'm really staring at the ceiling...its bizarre.
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cybertron1998
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5/13/2015 1:03:57 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/12/2015 9:14:26 PM, Lee001 wrote:
At 5/12/2015 8:05:03 PM, R0b1Billion wrote:
I'm 34, and I've been having them since I was perhaps 20.

Before I go on, I want to ask people: do you find things familiar in the dream world even though you've never encountered them before? Can you imagine yourself in a completely new place, around new people, and feel like you know them? That happens to me in my dreams, and that is the sensation I get during a waking dream - it's sort of like I'm being reminded of something that I've never experienced before. They are usually short, I have lots of little ones but I get a few big ones during the day that are pretty distracting ("little"=a half second, "big"= 2-3 seconds). I can go months without experiencing them at all, and sometimes (often after stressful episodes or if I don't get enough R.E.M. sleep) I can get them constantly throughout the week.

During my 20s, they were almost completely negative. By that I mean the thought was benign enough, but afterwards my emotional state would drop to zero. That may sound confusing, so let me explain that you, right now, are experiencing a steady supply of endorphins to keep you happy. You may feel happy right now, you may feel somewhat in a bad mood, but even if you are in a really bad mood, you are STILL enjoying a fair amount of happiness. I only know this because sometimes my episodes are accompanied by a dramatic drop-off in these endorphins, and it is a horrific feeling you will not know in your lifetime unless you have an acute psychological condition that causes it (like depression) or else you do what I've done when I was younger, and take a bunch of cocaine and then wait for the come-down. Cocaine floods you with positive chemicals, but afterwards the brain has a severe deficit and although there is no actual pain in the classical sense, simply the absence of the good chemicals is a practically-unbearable feeling. Anyway, that's how I feel sometimes after one of these, perhaps it has to do with my mind thinking I am asleep, in which case endorphins would probably not be needed. Today I'm having the little episodes very frequently (dozens today) with no acutely-negative side-effects, other than distraction.

One more detail is that the actual idea/dream/memory that suddenly surfaces during these episodes always disappears and I can't remember it. There's some sort of wall there; I experience the memory and then it is stripped from me even if I concentrate on keeping it.

Has anybody heard of anything like this before?

That's weird..I never have had "waking" dreams. I have allot of "D"j" Vu" dreams. Read more here: https://www.psychologytoday.com...

Sometimes, I will be dreaming, and its a nightmare and I wake up suddenly and gasp, its weird, my family members have seen it. Sometimes as well, I think I'm asleep, but I'm really staring at the ceiling...its bizarre.

see i have the opposite case but also similar cases. I've thought i've been awake but was actually asleep. I've also woken up and been able to look around but the rest of my body wasn't awake so i was paralyzed for like 5-10 seconds. I've also tried staying awake, and then closing my eyes, and then opening them again with the clock changing. But never have i ever woken myself up to a dream.
Epsilon: There are so many stories where some brave hero decides to give their life to save the day, and because of their sacrifice, the good guys win, the survivors all cheer, and everybody lives happily ever after. But the hero... never gets to see that ending. They'll never know if their sacrifice actually made a difference. They'll never know if the day was really saved. In the end, they just have to have faith.
R0b1Billion
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5/14/2015 8:44:51 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/12/2015 9:14:26 PM, Lee001 wrote:

That's weird..I never have had "waking" dreams. I have allot of "D"j" Vu" dreams. Read more here: https://www.psychologytoday.com...

My waking dreams are basically deja vu dreams, I'm thinking, that are constantly trying to poke through the surface. They are distinguished by the feeling that I'm re-experiencing something, yet the thoughts that appear in my mind are brand-new.

Sometimes, I will be dreaming, and its a nightmare and I wake up suddenly and gasp, its weird, my family members have seen it. Sometimes as well, I think I'm asleep, but I'm really staring at the ceiling...its bizarre.

Those aren't uncommon experiences. In the latter case, I'm guessing you are going to asleep (as opposed to waking up) and are at that half-way point. No?
Beliefs in a nutshell:
- The Ends never justify the Means.
- Objectivity is secondary to subjectivity.
- The War on Drugs is the worst policy in the U.S.
- Most people worship technology as a religion.
- Computers will never become sentient.
R0b1Billion
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5/14/2015 8:48:53 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/13/2015 1:03:57 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:

Sometimes, I will be dreaming, and its a nightmare and I wake up suddenly and gasp, its weird, my family members have seen it. Sometimes as well, I think I'm asleep, but I'm really staring at the ceiling...its bizarre.

see i have the opposite case but also similar cases. I've thought i've been awake but was actually asleep.

Isn't that what happens in every dream?

I've also woken up and been able to look around but the rest of my body wasn't awake so i was paralyzed for like 5-10 seconds.

That's not uncommon. It's happened to me once or twice, I believe it happens most often when you are awakened in a certain way.

I've also tried staying awake, and then closing my eyes, and then opening them again with the clock changing.

Sounds like you fell asleep for a moment and didn't realize it. I was on an out-of-town job a couple months back and was sharing a motel room with my co-worker, and he passed out while watching TV, snored for about a minute, woke back up and kept watching TV and didn't believe me that he had been asleep. I remember one time I was passing out at my friend's house and they were staring by the pool table watching me, and they waiting until I was under and reached over to me with the pool cue and blued my nose with the chalk! I was waking up intermittently and it seemed like no time had passed, but my nose was blue and I didn't know it :P

But never have i ever woken myself up to a dream.
Beliefs in a nutshell:
- The Ends never justify the Means.
- Objectivity is secondary to subjectivity.
- The War on Drugs is the worst policy in the U.S.
- Most people worship technology as a religion.
- Computers will never become sentient.
cybertron1998
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5/14/2015 8:51:46 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/14/2015 8:48:53 PM, R0b1Billion wrote:
At 5/13/2015 1:03:57 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:

Sometimes, I will be dreaming, and its a nightmare and I wake up suddenly and gasp, its weird, my family members have seen it. Sometimes as well, I think I'm asleep, but I'm really staring at the ceiling...its bizarre.

see i have the opposite case but also similar cases. I've thought i've been awake but was actually asleep.

Isn't that what happens in every dream?

No i mean i know my dreams from my awakeness, because my dreams are freaky, but i'm talking like i get up in the dream and go through my regular routine


I've also woken up and been able to look around but the rest of my body wasn't awake so i was paralyzed for like 5-10 seconds.

That's not uncommon. It's happened to me once or twice, I believe it happens most often when you are awakened in a certain way.

I've also tried staying awake, and then closing my eyes, and then opening them again with the clock changing.

Sounds like you fell asleep for a moment and didn't realize it. I was on an out-of-town job a couple months back and was sharing a motel room with my co-worker, and he passed out while watching TV, snored for about a minute, woke back up and kept watching TV and didn't believe me that he had been asleep. I remember one time I was passing out at my friend's house and they were staring by the pool table watching me, and they waiting until I was under and reached over to me with the pool cue and blued my nose with the chalk! I was waking up intermittently and it seemed like no time had passed, but my nose was blue and I didn't know it :P

But never have i ever woken myself up to a dream.
Epsilon: There are so many stories where some brave hero decides to give their life to save the day, and because of their sacrifice, the good guys win, the survivors all cheer, and everybody lives happily ever after. But the hero... never gets to see that ending. They'll never know if their sacrifice actually made a difference. They'll never know if the day was really saved. In the end, they just have to have faith.
Blade-of-Truth
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5/14/2015 9:40:55 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/12/2015 8:05:03 PM, R0b1Billion wrote:
Has anybody heard of anything like this before?

Have you ever seen the film 'Waking Life'?

Also, have you ever heard of lucid dreams?
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R0b1Billion
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5/14/2015 9:47:39 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/14/2015 8:51:46 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:
At 5/14/2015 8:48:53 PM, R0b1Billion wrote:
At 5/13/2015 1:03:57 PM, cybertron1998 wrote:

Sometimes, I will be dreaming, and its a nightmare and I wake up suddenly and gasp, its weird, my family members have seen it. Sometimes as well, I think I'm asleep, but I'm really staring at the ceiling...its bizarre.

see i have the opposite case but also similar cases. I've thought i've been awake but was actually asleep.

Isn't that what happens in every dream?

No i mean i know my dreams from my awakeness, because my dreams are freaky, but i'm talking like i get up in the dream and go through my regular routine

Are you describing lucid-dreaming here?

But never have i ever woken myself up to a dream.

I've had dreams that seem like I'm waking up from, which are still dreams... sort of a trick. I had one extraordinary one, where I had to be up for work at 6am but I went to bed super-late because I was a teenager and not very responsible. I went down at perhaps 3 or 4, and couldn't sleep. Apparently the reason I couldn't sleep is because I was TRYING to sleep too hard, which I learned that night is very counter-productive because I kept looking at the clock and the precise moment that I saw it was past 5am - thus, not really even worth trying to sleep anymore because I had to be up so soon - I passed out. I was trying to stay awake though, so it caused me a lucid-dream. I appeared a few miles away, and decided to start running home to get ready for work. After a few moments I realized the futility of my situation and that I was being deceived, and I suddenly appeared outside my window looking in at myself sleeping. Then I transported myself into my room and was looking at myself sleeping, and as I was about to awaken myself I realized I should probably take advantage of the situation I was in - after all, I was awake within my mind and there were things I could learn here. I went outside and found the electrical meter on the side of the house, and opened it up. I felt like there was a secret I wanted to know, that this was an opportunity to find something out about myself. After opening the meter, there was another box, perhaps even another (something was blocking me, putting obstacles in my way). I opened the last box and there was a piece of paper with the secret I wanted. I looked at it and the words scrambled. I peered closer and they appeared to jump back from me, out of sight, and then I awoke, a bit disappointed that I couldn't read it. That was about the time these episodes of mine began actually, and I wonder if I didn't jar something loose in my mind that night... perhaps some things are left unseen in the mind, perhaps I loosened too many subconscious barriers and instead of trying to overcome these types of things we ought to leave well-enough alone!
Beliefs in a nutshell:
- The Ends never justify the Means.
- Objectivity is secondary to subjectivity.
- The War on Drugs is the worst policy in the U.S.
- Most people worship technology as a religion.
- Computers will never become sentient.
R0b1Billion
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5/14/2015 9:50:51 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/14/2015 9:40:55 PM, Blade-of-Truth wrote:
At 5/12/2015 8:05:03 PM, R0b1Billion wrote:
Has anybody heard of anything like this before?

Have you ever seen the film 'Waking Life'?

Also, have you ever heard of lucid dreams?

Read the post I just made. Yes, I saw that film and I remember having extremely lucid dreams the night after I saw it. As I just alluded to in the last post, I have reason to believe that I've damaged my mind by trying to do precisely what that film suggests - loosen the barriers between the conscious and subconscious portions of my mind. These are there for a reason, and trying to screw with them is not a method of enlightenment, it is a method for breaking down things that are built for our own well-being.
Beliefs in a nutshell:
- The Ends never justify the Means.
- Objectivity is secondary to subjectivity.
- The War on Drugs is the worst policy in the U.S.
- Most people worship technology as a religion.
- Computers will never become sentient.
Blade-of-Truth
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5/14/2015 10:42:52 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/14/2015 9:50:51 PM, R0b1Billion wrote:
At 5/14/2015 9:40:55 PM, Blade-of-Truth wrote:
At 5/12/2015 8:05:03 PM, R0b1Billion wrote:
Has anybody heard of anything like this before?

Have you ever seen the film 'Waking Life'?

Also, have you ever heard of lucid dreams?

Read the post I just made. Yes, I saw that film and I remember having extremely lucid dreams the night after I saw it. As I just alluded to in the last post, I have reason to believe that I've damaged my mind by trying to do precisely what that film suggests - loosen the barriers between the conscious and subconscious portions of my mind. These are there for a reason, and trying to screw with them is not a method of enlightenment, it is a method for breaking down things that are built for our own well-being.

Okay, just read the last post. Sounds to me like you took lucid dreaming to the next step, which is astral projection. That explains how you were able to see your own body. While lucid dreaming, you don't see your own body, you are simply taking control of the dream after realizing it's just a dream.

I also would disagree that you've damaged your mind. I believe those barriers are there in the first place because not everyone was meant to go beyond a certain point. Doesn't mean that you can't or shouldn't attempt again after some more growth. If anything, you were just ill prepared for it because you were so fixated on the idea that it was a lucid dream. A good way to tell the difference between a lucid dream and astral projection is to look for the signs of an oncoming projection while falling asleep. Some of these signs would be a sensation of a fast-beating heart even though your pulse is normal upon checking. What's actually happening is your heart chakra is expanding at an exponential rate. Another sign is a sensation of "rocking", as if you were sleeping on a boat at sea or sitting on top of a washing machine. It feels like your body is rocking or pulsating even though you're on a stationary bed.

I just think, if anything, you've experienced astral projection as well as lucid dreaming.
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Blade-of-Truth
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5/14/2015 10:52:25 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/14/2015 9:50:51 PM, R0b1Billion wrote:

In lucid dreaming:

You are asleep
Your experience is a dream
Your location is wherever you wish it to be (desert, ocean, future, past, mom"s house, etc.)
Your consciousness is still inside your body
You can control the environment and characters
When the experience is over, you simply wake up

In astral projection:

You awaken, then you project
Your experience is real
Your experience begins in your bedroom, or wherever your body is
Your consciousness is outside of your body, and your body is left with none
You can manipulate your environment in the astral realm (somewhat), but you cannot control the actions of the inhabitants of the astral plane.
When the experience is over, you return to your body and merge your consciousness back into it

This isn't something that is set in stone though. Some things are easily debatable since it's still something that hasn't necessarily been verified via the scientific method. For instance, the line that your experience begins in your bedroom, or wherever your body is. Who's to say that you couldn't start a few streets away? So, ultimately, your experience can certainly be unique in and of itself, but it seems to share more similarities with astral projection rather than lucid dreaming.
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R0b1Billion
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5/15/2015 12:39:53 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/14/2015 10:42:52 PM, Blade-of-Truth wrote:

Okay, just read the last post. Sounds to me like you took lucid dreaming to the next step, which is astral projection. That explains how you were able to see your own body. While lucid dreaming, you don't see your own body, you are simply taking control of the dream after realizing it's just a dream.

I also would disagree that you've damaged your mind. I believe those barriers are there in the first place because not everyone was meant to go beyond a certain point. Doesn't mean that you can't or shouldn't attempt again after some more growth. If anything, you were just ill prepared for it because you were so fixated on the idea that it was a lucid dream. A good way to tell the difference between a lucid dream and astral projection is to look for the signs of an oncoming projection while falling asleep. Some of these signs would be a sensation of a fast-beating heart even though your pulse is normal upon checking. What's actually happening is your heart chakra is expanding at an exponential rate. Another sign is a sensation of "rocking", as if you were sleeping on a boat at sea or sitting on top of a washing machine. It feels like your body is rocking or pulsating even though you're on a stationary bed.

I just think, if anything, you've experienced astral projection as well as lucid dreaming.

I try to look at the general category of Nirvana, enlightenment, self-actualization, etc. in terms of virtue. Mainly humility, selflessness, diligence, charity, and control of one's naturally-indulgent nature. I am not attracted to theories of pushing oneself to "the next level" in terms of achievement of ambitious goals or chasing alluring ideals, sorry if that isn't worded the best but I'm not somebody who believes in aliens, ghosts, using the other 9/10ths of our brains, etc... If a theory is too sexy then I tend to doubt its authenticity. I'm not totally sure what direction you're going with this but if astral projection is some supernatural phenomenon then I'm not on-board. I'm not familiar with a "chakra" but maybe I have to research it further (I'm of to bed right now, I will make an attempt tomorrow).
Beliefs in a nutshell:
- The Ends never justify the Means.
- Objectivity is secondary to subjectivity.
- The War on Drugs is the worst policy in the U.S.
- Most people worship technology as a religion.
- Computers will never become sentient.
R0b1Billion
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5/15/2015 12:46:31 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/14/2015 10:52:25 PM, Blade-of-Truth wrote:
At 5/14/2015 9:50:51 PM, R0b1Billion wrote:

In lucid dreaming:

You are asleep
Your experience is a dream
Your location is wherever you wish it to be (desert, ocean, future, past, mom"s house, etc.)
Your consciousness is still inside your body
You can control the environment and characters
When the experience is over, you simply wake up

In astral projection:

You awaken, then you project
Your experience is real
Your experience begins in your bedroom, or wherever your body is
Your consciousness is outside of your body, and your body is left with none
You can manipulate your environment in the astral realm (somewhat), but you cannot control the actions of the inhabitants of the astral plane.
When the experience is over, you return to your body and merge your consciousness back into it

This isn't something that is set in stone though. Some things are easily debatable since it's still something that hasn't necessarily been verified via the scientific method. For instance, the line that your experience begins in your bedroom, or wherever your body is. Who's to say that you couldn't start a few streets away? So, ultimately, your experience can certainly be unique in and of itself, but it seems to share more similarities with astral projection rather than lucid dreaming.

I'll admit that conscious is inherently unempirical, but it's hard for me to accept theories that sacrifice rigorous study for things that are more exciting and dramatic. These things are science-fiction, and I've found that science-fact is far more fantastic. Things like quantum mechanics are more unbelievable than anything on the x-files, while the former is based on study and the latter on things that just appear to be cool.
Beliefs in a nutshell:
- The Ends never justify the Means.
- Objectivity is secondary to subjectivity.
- The War on Drugs is the worst policy in the U.S.
- Most people worship technology as a religion.
- Computers will never become sentient.
Otokage
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5/15/2015 8:18:01 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/12/2015 8:05:03 PM, R0b1Billion wrote:
I'm 34, and I've been having them since I was perhaps 20.

Before I go on, I want to ask people: do you find things familiar in the dream world even though you've never encountered them before? Can you imagine yourself in a completely new place, around new people, and feel like you know them? That happens to me in my dreams, and that is the sensation I get during a waking dream - it's sort of like I'm being reminded of something that I've never experienced before. They are usually short, I have lots of little ones but I get a few big ones during the day that are pretty distracting ("little"=a half second, "big"= 2-3 seconds). I can go months without experiencing them at all, and sometimes (often after stressful episodes or if I don't get enough R.E.M. sleep) I can get them constantly throughout the week.

During my 20s, they were almost completely negative. By that I mean the thought was benign enough, but afterwards my emotional state would drop to zero. That may sound confusing, so let me explain that you, right now, are experiencing a steady supply of endorphins to keep you happy. You may feel happy right now, you may feel somewhat in a bad mood, but even if you are in a really bad mood, you are STILL enjoying a fair amount of happiness. I only know this because sometimes my episodes are accompanied by a dramatic drop-off in these endorphins, and it is a horrific feeling you will not know in your lifetime unless you have an acute psychological condition that causes it (like depression) or else you do what I've done when I was younger, and take a bunch of cocaine and then wait for the come-down. Cocaine floods you with positive chemicals, but afterwards the brain has a severe deficit and although there is no actual pain in the classical sense, simply the absence of the good chemicals is a practically-unbearable feeling. Anyway, that's how I feel sometimes after one of these, perhaps it has to do with my mind thinking I am asleep, in which case endorphins would probably not be needed. Today I'm having the little episodes very frequently (dozens today) with no acutely-negative side-effects, other than distraction.

One more detail is that the actual idea/dream/memory that suddenly surfaces during these episodes always disappears and I can't remember it. There's some sort of wall there; I experience the memory and then it is stripped from me even if I concentrate on keeping it.

Has anybody heard of anything like this before?

I have a lot of deja vu if that's what you are meaning, like 1/month. I get stressed easily, and so my medic told me it was pretty usual to have Deja vu if you are stressed, so maybe that's your problem too.

About waking dreaming or "hypnagogia" I had those very often when I was a teen, but I have them now very rarely. Also related to stress it seems. My waking dreams were pretty terryfing, and I even had a few episodes of "Night Visitors" (don't know how they are called in english :P) which is the feeling of having a few shadows static around your bed looking at you, and you are awake, but at the same time paralyzed (by the effect of sleeping hormones), and you can not see them directly because they are at your sides (you have your head paralyzed so you can not turn to see them). They look strikingly threatening like they are going to do something in a moment, so it is very frustrating and scary even if it lasts only for a few seconds.

I can only advice you to take things more calmly. Maybe try meditation. And if your waking dreams increase at night (ie before or after sleeping), it could help to have dinner a few hours before going to bed so you don't go to sleep with a full stomach, and also to keep your room as quiet and stress-free as possible.
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5/15/2015 5:54:04 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/15/2015 8:18:01 AM, Otokage wrote:

I have a lot of deja vu if that's what you are meaning, like 1/month. I get stressed easily, and so my medic told me it was pretty usual to have Deja vu if you are stressed, so maybe that's your problem too.

That is very helpful. Allow me to dig deeper, in the hopes that we are similar. My condition involves sudden thoughts; I call them waking dreams but what you described below doesn't really fit the criteria. I'll be at work, sitting here typing, etc (they almost never happen in the morning or at night) and all of a sudden this thought jumps out of nowhere. It has a deja vu-feel in the sense that when we dream, we are able to dream about something we've never experienced before (or something that is completely ridiculous) and we feel comfortable and familiar with it. For instance, if you dreamt your house was a boat on the water, and it didn't cause the response in you that one would logically expect... I will get a sudden weird thought that pops into my head, and it has this air of familiarity, similar to a dream. Is this really a waking dream? Probably not, but it's the closest thing I can relate it to. Anyway, is this anything similar to your condition? If I've had a stressor in my life within a day or two, the episode is more pronounced and is accompanied by a deep feeling of depression, deeper than anything that is normally possible even if something truly dramatic were to be a stimulus to said depression.

About waking dreaming or "hypnagogia" I had those very often when I was a teen, but I have them now very rarely. Also related to stress it seems. My waking dreams were pretty terryfing, and I even had a few episodes of "Night Visitors" (don't know how they are called in english :P) which is the feeling of having a few shadows static around your bed looking at you, and you are awake, but at the same time paralyzed (by the effect of sleeping hormones), and you can not see them directly because they are at your sides (you have your head paralyzed so you can not turn to see them). They look strikingly threatening like they are going to do something in a moment, so it is very frustrating and scary even if it lasts only for a few seconds.

I can only advice you to take things more calmly. Maybe try meditation. And if your waking dreams increase at night (ie before or after sleeping), it could help to have dinner a few hours before going to bed so you don't go to sleep with a full stomach, and also to keep your room as quiet and stress-free as possible.
Beliefs in a nutshell:
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Otokage
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5/15/2015 7:39:27 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/15/2015 5:54:04 PM, R0b1Billion wrote:
At 5/15/2015 8:18:01 AM, Otokage wrote:

I have a lot of deja vu if that's what you are meaning, like 1/month. I get stressed easily, and so my medic told me it was pretty usual to have Deja vu if you are stressed, so maybe that's your problem too.

That is very helpful. Allow me to dig deeper, in the hopes that we are similar. My condition involves sudden thoughts; I call them waking dreams but what you described below doesn't really fit the criteria. I'll be at work, sitting here typing, etc (they almost never happen in the morning or at night) and all of a sudden this thought jumps out of nowhere. It has a deja vu-feel in the sense that when we dream, we are able to dream about something we've never experienced before (or something that is completely ridiculous) and we feel comfortable and familiar with it. For instance, if you dreamt your house was a boat on the water, and it didn't cause the response in you that one would logically expect... I will get a sudden weird thought that pops into my head, and it has this air of familiarity, similar to a dream. Is this really a waking dream? Probably not, but it's the closest thing I can relate it to. Anyway, is this anything similar to your condition? If I've had a stressor in my life within a day or two, the episode is more pronounced and is accompanied by a deep feeling of depression, deeper than anything that is normally possible even if something truly dramatic were to be a stimulus to said depression.

It seems a little different. I mean, what happens to me is a classical Deja vu. For example when I traveled to Paris for the first time and entered the subway, it felt it strikingly familiar although I had never been there before. This happens to me also with conversations, ie a friend would tell me something important for the first time, and I would be like "didn't I know that already?". You know, I get this feeling of being "repeating" things when I do them for the first time. But it isn't followed by depression at all, only by a frustrating feeling of being unable to tell if I've done that already or not, and also of being incapable of locating the action in time correctly (did I do it in a distant past? or did I do it just yesterday?), in fact, the inhability to locate the action in time is a classical sign that you are having a deja vu and not a real memory.

Also what happens to you doesn't seem like a waking dream. A waking dream is basicly a state in which you are partialy dreaming due to some mechanism (like sleeping hormones) triggering by mistake when you are not sleeping, and thus you can experience things like hallucinations (like dreams but with your eyes opened), you can be paralyzed, etc. It lasts seconds, but it is very frustrating.
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5/15/2015 8:26:59 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/15/2015 7:39:27 PM, Otokage wrote:
At 5/15/2015 5:54:04 PM, R0b1Billion wrote:
At 5/15/2015 8:18:01 AM, Otokage wrote:

I have a lot of deja vu if that's what you are meaning, like 1/month. I get stressed easily, and so my medic told me it was pretty usual to have Deja vu if you are stressed, so maybe that's your problem too.

That is very helpful. Allow me to dig deeper, in the hopes that we are similar. My condition involves sudden thoughts; I call them waking dreams but what you described below doesn't really fit the criteria. I'll be at work, sitting here typing, etc (they almost never happen in the morning or at night) and all of a sudden this thought jumps out of nowhere. It has a deja vu-feel in the sense that when we dream, we are able to dream about something we've never experienced before (or something that is completely ridiculous) and we feel comfortable and familiar with it. For instance, if you dreamt your house was a boat on the water, and it didn't cause the response in you that one would logically expect... I will get a sudden weird thought that pops into my head, and it has this air of familiarity, similar to a dream. Is this really a waking dream? Probably not, but it's the closest thing I can relate it to. Anyway, is this anything similar to your condition? If I've had a stressor in my life within a day or two, the episode is more pronounced and is accompanied by a deep feeling of depression, deeper than anything that is normally possible even if something truly dramatic were to be a stimulus to said depression.

It seems a little different. I mean, what happens to me is a classical Deja vu. For example when I traveled to Paris for the first time and entered the subway, it felt it strikingly familiar although I had never been there before. This happens to me also with conversations, ie a friend would tell me something important for the first time, and I would be like "didn't I know that already?". You know, I get this feeling of being "repeating" things when I do them for the first time. But it isn't followed by depression at all, only by a frustrating feeling of being unable to tell if I've done that already or not, and also of being incapable of locating the action in time correctly (did I do it in a distant past? or did I do it just yesterday?), in fact, the inhability to locate the action in time is a classical sign that you are having a deja vu and not a real memory.

Also what happens to you doesn't seem like a waking dream. A waking dream is basicly a state in which you are partialy dreaming due to some mechanism (like sleeping hormones) triggering by mistake when you are not sleeping, and thus you can experience things like hallucinations (like dreams but with your eyes opened), you can be paralyzed, etc. It lasts seconds, but it is very frustrating.

You're probably right, these are just like memories that are being triggered... like when you hear a song or smell something that brings you back to another place for a moment, except there is no stimulus (e.g., a song, smell, place, etc.) and the memory that is triggered is not actually a real memory. I fear my condition is probably unique, and I have no idea if it is very bad, slightly bad, or perhaps even something good, like I'm opening a part of my mind that hadn't been used before (I think this is unrealistically-optimistic, however). Most likely, it is a signal of some damage. My mother had schizophrenia and was a manic depressant, I could be exhibiting some of what she had, or maybe I really did pry open something I shouldn't have during a lucid dream back then. I suppose talking to a psychologist could be a good idea, but it would be a pretty long shot they could do anything and given that I function at a high level in all parts of my life, my guess is they'd say I'm fine but hey, here's some pills if you feel you need them...
Beliefs in a nutshell:
- The Ends never justify the Means.
- Objectivity is secondary to subjectivity.
- The War on Drugs is the worst policy in the U.S.
- Most people worship technology as a religion.
- Computers will never become sentient.
Otokage
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5/16/2015 5:45:46 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/15/2015 8:26:59 PM, R0b1Billion wrote:
At 5/15/2015 7:39:27 PM, Otokage wrote:
At 5/15/2015 5:54:04 PM, R0b1Billion wrote:
At 5/15/2015 8:18:01 AM, Otokage wrote:

I have a lot of deja vu if that's what you are meaning, like 1/month. I get stressed easily, and so my medic told me it was pretty usual to have Deja vu if you are stressed, so maybe that's your problem too.

That is very helpful. Allow me to dig deeper, in the hopes that we are similar. My condition involves sudden thoughts; I call them waking dreams but what you described below doesn't really fit the criteria. I'll be at work, sitting here typing, etc (they almost never happen in the morning or at night) and all of a sudden this thought jumps out of nowhere. It has a deja vu-feel in the sense that when we dream, we are able to dream about something we've never experienced before (or something that is completely ridiculous) and we feel comfortable and familiar with it. For instance, if you dreamt your house was a boat on the water, and it didn't cause the response in you that one would logically expect... I will get a sudden weird thought that pops into my head, and it has this air of familiarity, similar to a dream. Is this really a waking dream? Probably not, but it's the closest thing I can relate it to. Anyway, is this anything similar to your condition? If I've had a stressor in my life within a day or two, the episode is more pronounced and is accompanied by a deep feeling of depression, deeper than anything that is normally possible even if something truly dramatic were to be a stimulus to said depression.

It seems a little different. I mean, what happens to me is a classical Deja vu. For example when I traveled to Paris for the first time and entered the subway, it felt it strikingly familiar although I had never been there before. This happens to me also with conversations, ie a friend would tell me something important for the first time, and I would be like "didn't I know that already?". You know, I get this feeling of being "repeating" things when I do them for the first time. But it isn't followed by depression at all, only by a frustrating feeling of being unable to tell if I've done that already or not, and also of being incapable of locating the action in time correctly (did I do it in a distant past? or did I do it just yesterday?), in fact, the inhability to locate the action in time is a classical sign that you are having a deja vu and not a real memory.

Also what happens to you doesn't seem like a waking dream. A waking dream is basicly a state in which you are partialy dreaming due to some mechanism (like sleeping hormones) triggering by mistake when you are not sleeping, and thus you can experience things like hallucinations (like dreams but with your eyes opened), you can be paralyzed, etc. It lasts seconds, but it is very frustrating.

You're probably right, these are just like memories that are being triggered... like when you hear a song or smell something that brings you back to another place for a moment, except there is no stimulus (e.g., a song, smell, place, etc.) and the memory that is triggered is not actually a real memory. I fear my condition is probably unique, and I have no idea if it is very bad, slightly bad, or perhaps even something good, like I'm opening a part of my mind that hadn't been used before (I think this is unrealistically-optimistic, however). Most likely, it is a signal of some damage. My mother had schizophrenia and was a manic depressant, I could be exhibiting some of what she had, or maybe I really did pry open something I shouldn't have during a lucid dream back then. I suppose talking to a psychologist could be a good idea, but it would be a pretty long shot they could do anything and given that I function at a high level in all parts of my life, my guess is they'd say I'm fine but hey, here's some pills if you feel you need them...

Probably not "unique" but I certainly never heard something like that before. I don't think it is a bad thing except for the after-depression, that's the only thing I could call a bit pathological. If you mum was an schizoprenic, maybe it is related yes, but I wouldn't give it much importance unless it constitutes a problem on your daily basis, so I wouldn't take pills for it. So well, the only thing I can advice is to just to some activity that you like that can be relaxing to you, just to avoid stress, sleep good, etc. You probably know from your mum that schizofrenia can trigger/worsen due to stressful life habits. Just keep calm and take care :)
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5/16/2015 1:49:35 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/15/2015 12:39:53 AM, R0b1Billion wrote:
I am not attracted to theories of pushing oneself to "the next level" in terms of achievement of ambitious goals or chasing alluring ideals, sorry if that isn't worded the best but I'm not somebody who believes in aliens, ghosts, using the other 9/10ths of our brains, etc... If a theory is too sexy then I tend to doubt its authenticity. I'm not totally sure what direction you're going with this but if astral projection is some supernatural phenomenon then I'm not on-board. I'm not familiar with a "chakra" but maybe I have to research it further (I'm of to bed right now, I will make an attempt tomorrow).

But pushing oneself to the next level is what life is literally all about. In school we push ourselves to learn the new material being presented, in relationships we push ourselves to impress the person we want to be with when initially courting, in careers we push ourselves towards bigger paychecks. So to say you don't believe in such things is quite silly since it's a fundamental aspect of life.

If you simply meant that you aren't someone who is interested in metaphysical pursuits or things like astral projection then that's fine. Everyone is free to accept or dismiss theories, and ultimately that is exactly what astral projection is when placed under a scientific scope - just theory.

I would say that there's something about eastern philosophy and spirituality that is personally compelling to me, it's also what alot of western new-age spirituality is based on. For instance, the concept of Chakras stems from Hinduism. So exploring that religion or reading the popular text: Bhagavad-Gita would be a good place to start. I'd completely understand if you don't have the time or interest though, it's very rare finding someone who truly wishes to explore multiple religions in-depth to gain a bigger picture of it all.
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Blade-of-Truth
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5/16/2015 1:56:16 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/15/2015 12:46:31 AM, R0b1Billion wrote:
At 5/14/2015 10:52:25 PM, Blade-of-Truth wrote:
At 5/14/2015 9:50:51 PM, R0b1Billion wrote:

In lucid dreaming:

You are asleep
Your experience is a dream
Your location is wherever you wish it to be (desert, ocean, future, past, mom"s house, etc.)
Your consciousness is still inside your body
You can control the environment and characters
When the experience is over, you simply wake up

In astral projection:

You awaken, then you project
Your experience is real
Your experience begins in your bedroom, or wherever your body is
Your consciousness is outside of your body, and your body is left with none
You can manipulate your environment in the astral realm (somewhat), but you cannot control the actions of the inhabitants of the astral plane.
When the experience is over, you return to your body and merge your consciousness back into it

This isn't something that is set in stone though. Some things are easily debatable since it's still something that hasn't necessarily been verified via the scientific method. For instance, the line that your experience begins in your bedroom, or wherever your body is. Who's to say that you couldn't start a few streets away? So, ultimately, your experience can certainly be unique in and of itself, but it seems to share more similarities with astral projection rather than lucid dreaming.

I'll admit that conscious is inherently unempirical, but it's hard for me to accept theories that sacrifice rigorous study for things that are more exciting and dramatic. These things are science-fiction, and I've found that science-fact is far more fantastic.

I agree that consciousness is inherently non-empirical. However, I believe that science will eventually catch up. We must keep in mind that the scientific theory only proves observable phenomena as fact. Meanwhile, there's much that we first believed was pseudo-science until technology allowed for us to explore such phenomena closer, and eventually it too become fact.

At this point, if you wish to dismiss the possibility that the experience you described was astral projection, then that's fine. I was merely trying to make the point that your experience sounded more like astral projection rather than merely a lucid dream.
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dee-em
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5/20/2015 6:05:11 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/12/2015 8:05:03 PM, R0b1Billion wrote:
I'm 34, and I've been having them since I was perhaps 20.

Before I go on, I want to ask people: do you find things familiar in the dream world even though you've never encountered them before? Can you imagine yourself in a completely new place, around new people, and feel like you know them? That happens to me in my dreams, and that is the sensation I get during a waking dream - it's sort of like I'm being reminded of something that I've never experienced before. They are usually short, I have lots of little ones but I get a few big ones during the day that are pretty distracting ("little"=a half second, "big"= 2-3 seconds). I can go months without experiencing them at all, and sometimes (often after stressful episodes or if I don't get enough R.E.M. sleep) I can get them constantly throughout the week.

During my 20s, they were almost completely negative. By that I mean the thought was benign enough, but afterwards my emotional state would drop to zero. That may sound confusing, so let me explain that you, right now, are experiencing a steady supply of endorphins to keep you happy. You may feel happy right now, you may feel somewhat in a bad mood, but even if you are in a really bad mood, you are STILL enjoying a fair amount of happiness. I only know this because sometimes my episodes are accompanied by a dramatic drop-off in these endorphins, and it is a horrific feeling you will not know in your lifetime unless you have an acute psychological condition that causes it (like depression) or else you do what I've done when I was younger, and take a bunch of cocaine and then wait for the come-down. Cocaine floods you with positive chemicals, but afterwards the brain has a severe deficit and although there is no actual pain in the classical sense, simply the absence of the good chemicals is a practically-unbearable feeling. Anyway, that's how I feel sometimes after one of these, perhaps it has to do with my mind thinking I am asleep, in which case endorphins would probably not be needed. Today I'm having the little episodes very frequently (dozens today) with no acutely-negative side-effects, other than distraction.

One more detail is that the actual idea/dream/memory that suddenly surfaces during these episodes always disappears and I can't remember it. There's some sort of wall there; I experience the memory and then it is stripped from me even if I concentrate on keeping it.

Has anybody heard of anything like this before?

Some parts of what you describe sound like the temporal lobe epilepsy which I had about 10 years ago. It was definitely triggered by lack of sleep and/or stress. The episodes were very short and 'waking dreams' is a good description. There would be a kind of crescendo at the end (a brain storm of neural activity) and then a few moments of confusion. The 'dream' would then rapidly fade from memory. A few times I almost blacked out but never quite. I was on medication for a few years (required by law, eg. to hold a driver's license) and have now made a complete recovery.

You probably should seek some medical advice as you don't want to endanger yourself and others whilst you are having an episode.

I hope that helps.
dee-em
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5/20/2015 6:16:52 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
Heres a link to simple partial seizures which I had and which may account for your experiences too:

http://en.wikipedia.org...

A feeling of deja vu is quite common. For me it usually starting as if I was recalling a really interesting memory. Except that it soon became apparent that the memory was of an unreal nature. I usually had an alarming auditory climax at the end of the seizure.
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5/20/2015 3:01:05 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/20/2015 6:16:52 AM, dee-em wrote:
Heres a link to simple partial seizures which I had and which may account for your experiences too:

http://en.wikipedia.org...

A feeling of deja vu is quite common. For me it usually starting as if I was recalling a really interesting memory. Except that it soon became apparent that the memory was of an unreal nature. I usually had an alarming auditory climax at the end of the seizure.

Interesting, that is definitely the closest thing I've found so far. However the intensity of what I have does not border on seizure-level episodes, even the most intense versions were at most distracting, even though it made me feel really empty inside afterwards. As far as how well I can perform during one, I wouldn't have any trouble doing something of a physical nature, but if I was doing something that required a lot of brainpower, it might hamper me a little. I don't see myself putting anybody in danger because of it, unless it were to suddenly get worse.

I noticed herpes-virus was cited as a possible cause, I've had canker-sores since I was a very young child so I imagine that my body is more susceptible than most to the damage it causes. Perhaps, during a more weakened state sometime fifteen years ago (almost certainly after I had been binge-drinking), I weakened my body enough for it to get to parts of my brain. There's SO much speculation I can make about all this though...
Beliefs in a nutshell:
- The Ends never justify the Means.
- Objectivity is secondary to subjectivity.
- The War on Drugs is the worst policy in the U.S.
- Most people worship technology as a religion.
- Computers will never become sentient.
dee-em
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5/20/2015 6:30:40 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/20/2015 3:01:05 PM, R0b1Billion wrote:
At 5/20/2015 6:16:52 AM, dee-em wrote:
Heres a link to simple partial seizures which I had and which may account for your experiences too:

http://en.wikipedia.org...

A feeling of deja vu is quite common. For me it usually starting as if I was recalling a really interesting memory. Except that it soon became apparent that the memory was of an unreal nature. I usually had an alarming auditory climax at the end of the seizure.

Interesting, that is definitely the closest thing I've found so far. However the intensity of what I have does not border on seizure-level episodes, even the most intense versions were at most distracting, even though it made me feel really empty inside afterwards. As far as how well I can perform during one, I wouldn't have any trouble doing something of a physical nature, but if I was doing something that required a lot of brainpower, it might hamper me a little. I don't see myself putting anybody in danger because of it, unless it were to suddenly get worse.

I noticed herpes-virus was cited as a possible cause, I've had canker-sores since I was a very young child so I imagine that my body is more susceptible than most to the damage it causes. Perhaps, during a more weakened state sometime fifteen years ago (almost certainly after I had been binge-drinking), I weakened my body enough for it to get to parts of my brain. There's SO much speculation I can make about all this though...

When discussing possible causes with my neurologist I had the impression that not a lot is known about what triggers this condition. I had a few scans but nothing showed up. My own theory has to do with a high, prolonged fever I had about a year before the onset of symptoms. I had been in hospital with a ruptured appendix (after having been sent home the day before with "irritable bowel syndrome" - but that's another story). Anyway, after surgery and cleaning up the mess, they pumped me full with three different antibiotics. One or more of these caused the fever. I remember the nurse frantically trying to get my temperature down and calling a doctor for advice in the middle of the night. He told her to maintain the antibiotics as the lesser of two evils. This went on for several days. It probably saved my life but the high body temperature must have fried my brain a little.

The explanation I was given was that I had either an elevated or reduced (I can't remember which) level of GABA fluid in the brain. This resulted in the periodic episodes of out-of-control neural activity. The medication I was given dampens this neural firestorm by adjusting the production of the GABA fluid. (This is all from memory, so take it with a grain of salt).

I wasn't aware of the possible link with the herpes virus. You might want to discuss this with your GP and get a referral to a neurologist. Your symptoms sound milder than mine, but it's worth checking out.

Best of luck.