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Secular users: Do you like religious music?

Diqiucun_Cunmin
Posts: 2,710
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6/20/2015 11:30:34 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I was inspired by Thett's recent thread to start this.

Personally, I like a lot of religious music! By religious music, I mean both sacred music - masses, requiem masses, etc. - and music with religious themes, like the Dante sonata. My favourite is, of course, Bach's Mass in B minor.

I think it's possible to love religious music even if you aren't religious. How about you?
The thing is, I hate relativism. I hate relativism more than I hate everything else, excepting, maybe, fibreglass powerboats... What it overlooks, to put it briefly and crudely, is the fixed structure of human nature. - Jerry Fodor

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tejretics
Posts: 6,094
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6/21/2015 3:38:03 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/20/2015 11:30:34 PM, Diqiucun_Cunmin wrote:
I was inspired by Thett's recent thread to start this.

Personally, I like a lot of religious music! By religious music, I mean both sacred music - masses, requiem masses, etc. - and music with religious themes, like the Dante sonata. My favourite is, of course, Bach's Mass in B minor.

I think it's possible to love religious music even if you aren't religious. How about you?

Yes! Dies Irae and Verdi's the Requiem, and most of Bach's stuff (if they're indeed inspired religiously). I also like some lighter and easy-going ones, like Silent Night.
"Where justice is denied, where poverty is enforced, where ignorance prevails, and where any one class is made to feel that society is an organized conspiracy to oppress, rob and degrade them, neither persons nor property will be safe." - Frederick Douglass
Diqiucun_Cunmin
Posts: 2,710
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6/21/2015 3:53:37 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/21/2015 3:38:03 AM, tejretics wrote:
At 6/20/2015 11:30:34 PM, Diqiucun_Cunmin wrote:
I was inspired by Thett's recent thread to start this.

Personally, I like a lot of religious music! By religious music, I mean both sacred music - masses, requiem masses, etc. - and music with religious themes, like the Dante sonata. My favourite is, of course, Bach's Mass in B minor.

I think it's possible to love religious music even if you aren't religious. How about you?

Yes! Dies Irae and Verdi's the Requiem, and most of Bach's stuff (if they're indeed inspired religiously). I also like some lighter and easy-going ones, like Silent Night.

Haha, I know your obsession with Dies Irae. It's getting a little... evil, lol.

My favourite requiems are Mozart's and Faure's. I haven't got enough of them to proceed to Verdi's, though I know it exists. I'll probably look into Brahms' as well.

The Bach B minor must be my favourite mass in general. You haven't lived if you haven't heard it. Most of the Bach works I like are secular, usually orchestral - violin concerti, orchestral suites and Brandenberg concerti - plus some keyboard works. (I'm not the biggest fan of his string solos.) Yet I think choral works are a central, indispensable part of the Western music repertoire, and thus I listen to them quite a bit as well. The thing is, the good choral works tend to be sacred, haha. I actually have the St John Passion up at the moment.
The thing is, I hate relativism. I hate relativism more than I hate everything else, excepting, maybe, fibreglass powerboats... What it overlooks, to put it briefly and crudely, is the fixed structure of human nature. - Jerry Fodor

Don't be a stat cynic:
http://www.debate.org...

Response to conservative views on deforestation:
http://www.debate.org...

Topics I'd like to debate (not debating ATM): http://tinyurl.com...
tejretics
Posts: 6,094
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6/21/2015 3:54:33 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/21/2015 3:53:37 AM, Diqiucun_Cunmin wrote:
At 6/21/2015 3:38:03 AM, tejretics wrote:
At 6/20/2015 11:30:34 PM, Diqiucun_Cunmin wrote:
I was inspired by Thett's recent thread to start this.

Personally, I like a lot of religious music! By religious music, I mean both sacred music - masses, requiem masses, etc. - and music with religious themes, like the Dante sonata. My favourite is, of course, Bach's Mass in B minor.

I think it's possible to love religious music even if you aren't religious. How about you?

Yes! Dies Irae and Verdi's the Requiem, and most of Bach's stuff (if they're indeed inspired religiously). I also like some lighter and easy-going ones, like Silent Night.

Haha, I know your obsession with Dies Irae. It's getting a little... evil, lol.

Eh, French Suite Number 5 can beat it.


My favourite requiems are Mozart's and Faure's. I haven't got enough of them to proceed to Verdi's, though I know it exists. I'll probably look into Brahms' as well.

The Bach B minor must be my favourite mass in general. You haven't lived if you haven't heard it. Most of the Bach works I like are secular, usually orchestral - violin concerti, orchestral suites and Brandenberg concerti - plus some keyboard works. (I'm not the biggest fan of his string solos.) Yet I think choral works are a central, indispensable part of the Western music repertoire, and thus I listen to them quite a bit as well. The thing is, the good choral works tend to be sacred, haha. I actually have the St John Passion up at the moment.
"Where justice is denied, where poverty is enforced, where ignorance prevails, and where any one class is made to feel that society is an organized conspiracy to oppress, rob and degrade them, neither persons nor property will be safe." - Frederick Douglass
Diqiucun_Cunmin
Posts: 2,710
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6/21/2015 3:55:21 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/21/2015 3:54:33 AM, tejretics wrote:
At 6/21/2015 3:53:37 AM, Diqiucun_Cunmin wrote:
At 6/21/2015 3:38:03 AM, tejretics wrote:
At 6/20/2015 11:30:34 PM, Diqiucun_Cunmin wrote:
I was inspired by Thett's recent thread to start this.

Personally, I like a lot of religious music! By religious music, I mean both sacred music - masses, requiem masses, etc. - and music with religious themes, like the Dante sonata. My favourite is, of course, Bach's Mass in B minor.

I think it's possible to love religious music even if you aren't religious. How about you?

Yes! Dies Irae and Verdi's the Requiem, and most of Bach's stuff (if they're indeed inspired religiously). I also like some lighter and easy-going ones, like Silent Night.

Haha, I know your obsession with Dies Irae. It's getting a little... evil, lol.

Eh, English Suite Number 3 can beat it.
Fixed

My favourite requiems are Mozart's and Faure's. I haven't got enough of them to proceed to Verdi's, though I know it exists. I'll probably look into Brahms' as well.

The Bach B minor must be my favourite mass in general. You haven't lived if you haven't heard it. Most of the Bach works I like are secular, usually orchestral - violin concerti, orchestral suites and Brandenberg concerti - plus some keyboard works. (I'm not the biggest fan of his string solos.) Yet I think choral works are a central, indispensable part of the Western music repertoire, and thus I listen to them quite a bit as well. The thing is, the good choral works tend to be sacred, haha. I actually have the St John Passion up at the moment.
The thing is, I hate relativism. I hate relativism more than I hate everything else, excepting, maybe, fibreglass powerboats... What it overlooks, to put it briefly and crudely, is the fixed structure of human nature. - Jerry Fodor

Don't be a stat cynic:
http://www.debate.org...

Response to conservative views on deforestation:
http://www.debate.org...

Topics I'd like to debate (not debating ATM): http://tinyurl.com...
Zaradi
Posts: 14,128
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6/21/2015 2:52:58 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Idk about piano stuff, but I do listen to a lot of Christian rock/metal music. Specifically bands like flyleaf, skillet, and fireflight. Really good stuff.
Want to debate? Pick a topic and hit me up! - http://www.debate.org...
Mirza
Posts: 16,992
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6/21/2015 3:00:01 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I am a Muslim, but I listen to Christian music and chants. Generally, it is music from Middle Ages and Renaissance. Modern Christian music does not really interest me.

Gregorian chants are timeless; while some types of music can match this kind, nothing can surpass it. They are works of wonder.
JMcKinley
Posts: 314
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6/23/2015 9:53:40 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
Music in and of itself can not be religious. It does not have the capability to be religious on its own. It may be religiously inspired, or have religious association or connotations but it can not be religious by its very nature. Songs can have religious lyrics but music and lyrics are two separate things. They work very well together but they are definitely distinct from one another.

So if we're talking about liking songs with religious lyrics, then yes I still enjoy them, albeit slightly less so. If they are overtly religious I enjoy them less because I either don't relate, don't agree or don't get the references. Its harder to like songs that you don't relate to in some way. But the odd reference or underlying religious theme doesn't bug me much. I listen to a wide range of music and some of it unavoidably has religious references or themes, but as long the music is good and the religion is toned down to a reasonable level I still enjoy it.
Diqiucun_Cunmin
Posts: 2,710
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6/23/2015 11:50:42 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/21/2015 3:00:01 PM, Mirza wrote:
I am a Muslim, but I listen to Christian music and chants. Generally, it is music from Middle Ages and Renaissance. Modern Christian music does not really interest me.

Gregorian chants are timeless; while some types of music can match this kind, nothing can surpass it. They are works of wonder.

Agreed, the modes in Gregorian chants are intriguing, even though I don't understand the underlying theories behind them. I like them as well.

Though I must admit that monophonic a capella music can get a little dull. I prefer the colouring and counterpoint that later generations of Baroque, Classical and romantic composers gave choral music, particularly, as I've said, Bach's Mass in B Minor.

Since you mentioned the Renaissance, do you often listen to Palestrina? I find those compositions more intriguing, compared to the plainchant form.
The thing is, I hate relativism. I hate relativism more than I hate everything else, excepting, maybe, fibreglass powerboats... What it overlooks, to put it briefly and crudely, is the fixed structure of human nature. - Jerry Fodor

Don't be a stat cynic:
http://www.debate.org...

Response to conservative views on deforestation:
http://www.debate.org...

Topics I'd like to debate (not debating ATM): http://tinyurl.com...
Diqiucun_Cunmin
Posts: 2,710
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6/23/2015 11:56:23 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/23/2015 9:53:40 AM, JMcKinley wrote:
Music in and of itself can not be religious. It does not have the capability to be religious on its own. It may be religiously inspired, or have religious association or connotations but it can not be religious by its very nature. Songs can have religious lyrics but music and lyrics are two separate things. They work very well together but they are definitely distinct from one another.
Well... I guess you could say that. Some music is simply religiously inspired, or have religious association or connotations, as you have said, say Liszt's crux fidelis theme, which he used in many compositions as a symbol of the Christian Cross. However, I'd argue that sacred works like masses and Gregorian chants are religious on their own.
So if we're talking about liking songs with religious lyrics, then yes I still enjoy them, albeit slightly less so. If they are overtly religious I enjoy them less because I either don't relate, don't agree or don't get the references. Its harder to like songs that you don't relate to in some way. But the odd reference or underlying religious theme doesn't bug me much. I listen to a wide range of music and some of it unavoidably has religious references or themes, but as long the music is good and the religion is toned down to a reasonable level I still enjoy it.
Most sacred music is in Latin, though. They're overtly religious, but I don't think the performers expect the listener to understand anything. I think that when these pieces are heard as works of art, religious and secular listeners can have the same experience.
The thing is, I hate relativism. I hate relativism more than I hate everything else, excepting, maybe, fibreglass powerboats... What it overlooks, to put it briefly and crudely, is the fixed structure of human nature. - Jerry Fodor

Don't be a stat cynic:
http://www.debate.org...

Response to conservative views on deforestation:
http://www.debate.org...

Topics I'd like to debate (not debating ATM): http://tinyurl.com...
Mirza
Posts: 16,992
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6/23/2015 12:13:50 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/23/2015 11:50:42 AM, Diqiucun_Cunmin wrote:
Agreed, the modes in Gregorian chants are intriguing, even though I don't understand the underlying theories behind them. I like them as well.

Though I must admit that monophonic a capella music can get a little dull. I prefer the colouring and counterpoint that later generations of Baroque, Classical and romantic composers gave choral music, particularly, as I've said, Bach's Mass in B Minor.
A good set of Medieval and Renaissance chant/polyphony here: https://www.youtube.com... Perhaps you like that more; especially the song at 18:00 is wonderful.

I don't have anything against the monophonic nature of the Medieval chants. They are beautiful as they are. And, IMO, the later types of music are not better; they are on the same level I would say.

Since you mentioned the Renaissance, do you often listen to Palestrina? I find those compositions more intriguing, compared to the plainchant form.
I haven't listened much to his works, but I'll do eventually.