Total Posts:7|Showing Posts:1-7
Jump to topic:

What should I expect for Engineering Math

Disquisition
Posts: 391
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/28/2015 4:52:17 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Made a similar post about Calculus 3 which was a breeze, I got an A in it. For the Fall I might have to take Engineering Mathematics, has anyone taken it who can give me some insight.
JMcKinley
Posts: 314
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/29/2015 11:33:26 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
Never took an "Engineering Math" course. But since its not Calculus since you've already taken That, then I would assume it must be a linear algebra or numerical methods course. Would this be accurate?

If its either one of those and you breezed through calculus, you shouldn't have much trouble. They aren't trivial but compared to calculus they are less difficult, or at least they were for me. Calculus was by far the biggest hurdle for me while getting my BScE degree, so perhaps I am biased in my advice.
Geogeer
Posts: 4,286
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/29/2015 2:29:56 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/28/2015 4:52:17 PM, Disquisition wrote:
Made a similar post about Calculus 3 which was a breeze, I got an A in it. For the Fall I might have to take Engineering Mathematics, has anyone taken it who can give me some insight.

If it is anything like the math courses I took (I'm an engineer). They were the same conics and calculus classes as the non-engineering students took, but they added some little thing like imaginary numbers. This was necessary for those entering electrical engineering, but the main purpose was to keep the engineers out of the regular math courses so that we didn't screw up the curve.
JMcKinley
Posts: 314
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/29/2015 3:03:00 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/29/2015 2:29:56 PM, Geogeer wrote:
At 6/28/2015 4:52:17 PM, Disquisition wrote:
Made a similar post about Calculus 3 which was a breeze, I got an A in it. For the Fall I might have to take Engineering Mathematics, has anyone taken it who can give me some insight.

If it is anything like the math courses I took (I'm an engineer). They were the same conics and calculus classes as the non-engineering students took, but they added some little thing like imaginary numbers. This was necessary for those entering electrical engineering, but the main purpose was to keep the engineers out of the regular math courses so that we didn't screw up the curve.

Mechanicals need their imaginary numbers as well. Systems dynamics and vibrations require them. Being a mechanical engineer myself I remember those courses quite vividly.

And you probably have a point about the curves. Took me 3 tries to get Calculus 2. But I did eventually pass with an A once I got it all figured out.
Geogeer
Posts: 4,286
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/29/2015 3:05:04 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/29/2015 3:03:00 PM, JMcKinley wrote:
At 6/29/2015 2:29:56 PM, Geogeer wrote:
At 6/28/2015 4:52:17 PM, Disquisition wrote:
Made a similar post about Calculus 3 which was a breeze, I got an A in it. For the Fall I might have to take Engineering Mathematics, has anyone taken it who can give me some insight.

If it is anything like the math courses I took (I'm an engineer). They were the same conics and calculus classes as the non-engineering students took, but they added some little thing like imaginary numbers. This was necessary for those entering electrical engineering, but the main purpose was to keep the engineers out of the regular math courses so that we didn't screw up the curve.


Mechanicals need their imaginary numbers as well. Systems dynamics and vibrations require them. Being a mechanical engineer myself I remember those courses quite vividly.

Curious... I took a dynamics of structures dealing with vibrations and never encountered them... Learn something every day!
JMcKinley
Posts: 314
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/30/2015 7:42:42 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/29/2015 3:05:04 PM, Geogeer wrote:
At 6/29/2015 3:03:00 PM, JMcKinley wrote:
At 6/29/2015 2:29:56 PM, Geogeer wrote:
At 6/28/2015 4:52:17 PM, Disquisition wrote:
Made a similar post about Calculus 3 which was a breeze, I got an A in it. For the Fall I might have to take Engineering Mathematics, has anyone taken it who can give me some insight.

If it is anything like the math courses I took (I'm an engineer). They were the same conics and calculus classes as the non-engineering students took, but they added some little thing like imaginary numbers. This was necessary for those entering electrical engineering, but the main purpose was to keep the engineers out of the regular math courses so that we didn't screw up the curve.


Mechanicals need their imaginary numbers as well. Systems dynamics and vibrations require them. Being a mechanical engineer myself I remember those courses quite vividly.

Curious... I took a dynamics of structures dealing with vibrations and never encountered them... Learn something every day!

I think its more on the system dynamics and controls side than vibrations. When simulating mechatronic systems you've got to deal with Eigenvalues that can be real, imaginary or complex with both real and imaginary parts. I can remember drawing a lot of graphs with real and imaginary axis.
RoyLatham
Posts: 4,488
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
7/4/2015 4:14:22 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/28/2015 4:52:17 PM, Disquisition wrote:
Made a similar post about Calculus 3 which was a breeze, I got an A in it. For the Fall I might have to take Engineering Mathematics, has anyone taken it who can give me some insight.

There is no such thing as "Engineering Math" as a subject different from Math math. All we can do is guess what part of math someone thinks most relevant to engineering. I'm guessing it's differential equations, because that is common to electromagnetic wave propagation, time series analysis, and structural analysis. It's also when some students who thought they were interested in engineering discover they were really interested in art history. But there is no telling for sure, it might be linear algebra or complex variables. You'll have to ask someone who's taken the course, or maybe find the textbook for the course.