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New Jersey Sucks

Harper
Posts: 374
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6/30/2015 3:32:22 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
This July marks the 1 year that I have lived in the state of New Jersey and so far I have had a tremendously negative experience. Why? (Warning: rated "R" for Rant)

1. The People:
We live in human society principally to be with other people, both for the services they offer (such as healthcare, car repairs, school, access to food via grocery stores, etc.) and for a healthy social life. It is for this reason that the quality of one's experience with the people around them strongly affects their overall experience living in that place. In fact, it is one of the biggest reasons why I have not had a very enjoyable experience here.
While the majority of people in any given city, state, or country are generally nice people, places do differ in the "percentage" or "rate" so-to-speak of such people. In my experience, you are much more likely to meet a rude person in New Jersey than you are in Texas, a state known for its exceptionally friendly people. In fact, in all of the places I've visited, I have never met so many rude people than I have in New York (specifically NYC) and New Jersey, respectively.
When interacting with people in New Jersey, I have noticed that too many are arrogant and/or explicitly perfunctory. They will say the normal "thank you"s, "have a nice day"s, and "are you looking for anything"s that a person working in a service sector job usually has to say, but it is often done with such an off-hand attitude that I have never experienced before living in Texas. I have also noticed that when you hold doors for others and treat them with kindness, as I was raised to do, many will act as if they are somehow entitled to such treatment and respond in arrogance. It really rustles my jimmies.

2. The Architecture:
Newark, Trenton, Paterson, and Camden rank as some of the ugliest cities I have ever come across. It is such a shame since the east coast has some of the most beautiful wildlife and scenery in America that the residents of New Jersey only downgrade it with ugly and outdated architecture. Even in places like Scotch Plain, Edison, and Westfield (the more beautiful areas) the houses and buildings are often also outdated, plain, or just downright ugly. I get that historical or traditional styles can be and are beautiful, but there is just no majesty to any of these cities or townships-- again, it just looks outdated and trashy. This is especially troubling since the physical surroundings do affect a person's psychological health and mood [1]. It's also exceptionally cramped-- you often feel caged. This place has been so bad for my psychological health.

3. The Prices:
This state is so darn expensive. To get in, you need to pay for toll roads. To live in it, you need to pay insane taxes, pay insanely (and, frankly, undeservingly) expensive rent/mortgage, and pay for expensive yet often sub-par services and goods. And then, when you get sick of it all and want to leave it, you also have to pay a special "exit tax", in addition to yet even more poll roads [2]. The exit tax is the most amusing, since it really just shows the government's desperation to keep people from escaping this certified hellhole, since they are fleeing in droves [3].

Summary:
All in all, I would recommend that for those of you who are not stuck here, to never even think about moving here. The scenery in some places of the state are beautiful, but really all of America is beautiful, so there is no reason to live here if you are not absolutely compelled to do so. If you do move here, you will hardly have a positive experience if you enjoy friendly people, beautiful cities, and reasonable prices.

Conclusion:
I wish I had stayed in frickin' Texas.

Sources:
[1] http://www.citylab.com...)
[2] http://www.nj.com...
[3] http://www.nj.com...
sadolite
Posts: 8,837
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7/2/2015 6:10:53 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/30/2015 3:32:22 PM, Harper wrote:
This July marks the 1 year that I have lived in the state of New Jersey and so far I have had a tremendously negative experience. Why? (Warning: rated "R" for Rant)

1. The People:
We live in human society principally to be with other people, both for the services they offer (such as healthcare, car repairs, school, access to food via grocery stores, etc.) and for a healthy social life. It is for this reason that the quality of one's experience with the people around them strongly affects their overall experience living in that place. In fact, it is one of the biggest reasons why I have not had a very enjoyable experience here.
While the majority of people in any given city, state, or country are generally nice people, places do differ in the "percentage" or "rate" so-to-speak of such people. In my experience, you are much more likely to meet a rude person in New Jersey than you are in Texas, a state known for its exceptionally friendly people. In fact, in all of the places I've visited, I have never met so many rude people than I have in New York (specifically NYC) and New Jersey, respectively.
When interacting with people in New Jersey, I have noticed that too many are arrogant and/or explicitly perfunctory. They will say the normal "thank you"s, "have a nice day"s, and "are you looking for anything"s that a person working in a service sector job usually has to say, but it is often done with such an off-hand attitude that I have never experienced before living in Texas. I have also noticed that when you hold doors for others and treat them with kindness, as I was raised to do, many will act as if they are somehow entitled to such treatment and respond in arrogance. It really rustles my jimmies.

2. The Architecture:
Newark, Trenton, Paterson, and Camden rank as some of the ugliest cities I have ever come across. It is such a shame since the east coast has some of the most beautiful wildlife and scenery in America that the residents of New Jersey only downgrade it with ugly and outdated architecture. Even in places like Scotch Plain, Edison, and Westfield (the more beautiful areas) the houses and buildings are often also outdated, plain, or just downright ugly. I get that historical or traditional styles can be and are beautiful, but there is just no majesty to any of these cities or townships-- again, it just looks outdated and trashy. This is especially troubling since the physical surroundings do affect a person's psychological health and mood [1]. It's also exceptionally cramped-- you often feel caged. This place has been so bad for my psychological health.

3. The Prices:
This state is so darn expensive. To get in, you need to pay for toll roads. To live in it, you need to pay insane taxes, pay insanely (and, frankly, undeservingly) expensive rent/mortgage, and pay for expensive yet often sub-par services and goods. And then, when you get sick of it all and want to leave it, you also have to pay a special "exit tax", in addition to yet even more poll roads [2]. The exit tax is the most amusing, since it really just shows the government's desperation to keep people from escaping this certified hellhole, since they are fleeing in droves [3].

Summary:
All in all, I would recommend that for those of you who are not stuck here, to never even think about moving here. The scenery in some places of the state are beautiful, but really all of America is beautiful, so there is no reason to live here if you are not absolutely compelled to do so. If you do move here, you will hardly have a positive experience if you enjoy friendly people, beautiful cities, and reasonable prices.

Conclusion:
I wish I had stayed in frickin' Texas.

Sources:
[1] http://www.citylab.com...)
[2] http://www.nj.com...
[3] http://www.nj.com...

You moved to New Jersey on purpose?
It's not your views that divide us, it's what you think my views should be that divides us.

If you think I will give up my rights and forsake social etiquette to make you "FEEL" better you are sadly mistaken

If liberal democrats would just stop shooting people gun violence would drop by 90%
Harper
Posts: 374
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7/4/2015 5:25:37 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/2/2015 6:10:53 PM, sadolite wrote:
At 6/30/2015 3:32:22 PM, Harper wrote:
This July marks the 1 year that I have lived in the state of New Jersey and so far I have had a tremendously negative experience. Why? (Warning: rated "R" for Rant)

1. The People:
We live in human society principally to be with other people, both for the services they offer (such as healthcare, car repairs, school, access to food via grocery stores, etc.) and for a healthy social life. It is for this reason that the quality of one's experience with the people around them strongly affects their overall experience living in that place. In fact, it is one of the biggest reasons why I have not had a very enjoyable experience here.
While the majority of people in any given city, state, or country are generally nice people, places do differ in the "percentage" or "rate" so-to-speak of such people. In my experience, you are much more likely to meet a rude person in New Jersey than you are in Texas, a state known for its exceptionally friendly people. In fact, in all of the places I've visited, I have never met so many rude people than I have in New York (specifically NYC) and New Jersey, respectively.
When interacting with people in New Jersey, I have noticed that too many are arrogant and/or explicitly perfunctory. They will say the normal "thank you"s, "have a nice day"s, and "are you looking for anything"s that a person working in a service sector job usually has to say, but it is often done with such an off-hand attitude that I have never experienced before living in Texas. I have also noticed that when you hold doors for others and treat them with kindness, as I was raised to do, many will act as if they are somehow entitled to such treatment and respond in arrogance. It really rustles my jimmies.

2. The Architecture:
Newark, Trenton, Paterson, and Camden rank as some of the ugliest cities I have ever come across. It is such a shame since the east coast has some of the most beautiful wildlife and scenery in America that the residents of New Jersey only downgrade it with ugly and outdated architecture. Even in places like Scotch Plain, Edison, and Westfield (the more beautiful areas) the houses and buildings are often also outdated, plain, or just downright ugly. I get that historical or traditional styles can be and are beautiful, but there is just no majesty to any of these cities or townships-- again, it just looks outdated and trashy. This is especially troubling since the physical surroundings do affect a person's psychological health and mood [1]. It's also exceptionally cramped-- you often feel caged. This place has been so bad for my psychological health.

3. The Prices:
This state is so darn expensive. To get in, you need to pay for toll roads. To live in it, you need to pay insane taxes, pay insanely (and, frankly, undeservingly) expensive rent/mortgage, and pay for expensive yet often sub-par services and goods. And then, when you get sick of it all and want to leave it, you also have to pay a special "exit tax", in addition to yet even more poll roads [2]. The exit tax is the most amusing, since it really just shows the government's desperation to keep people from escaping this certified hellhole, since they are fleeing in droves [3].

Summary:
All in all, I would recommend that for those of you who are not stuck here, to never even think about moving here. The scenery in some places of the state are beautiful, but really all of America is beautiful, so there is no reason to live here if you are not absolutely compelled to do so. If you do move here, you will hardly have a positive experience if you enjoy friendly people, beautiful cities, and reasonable prices.

Conclusion:
I wish I had stayed in frickin' Texas.

Sources:
[1] http://www.citylab.com...)
[2] http://www.nj.com...
[3] http://www.nj.com...

You moved to New Jersey on purpose?
I had to, as my father's job moved here.
Skepsikyma
Posts: 8,280
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7/4/2015 10:53:13 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/30/2015 3:32:22 PM, Harper wrote:

I live in eastern Pennylvania, and like to picture us as Gondor, the Delaware as the River Anduin, and Newark, Trenton, and Camden as the Morannon, Barad-dur, and Minas Morghul, respectively. I suppose that the Jersey Shore would be Umbar. But yeah, I try not to cross the river.
"The Collectivist experiment is thoroughly suited (in appearance at least) to the Capitalist society which it proposes to replace. It works with the existing machinery of Capitalism, talks and thinks in the existing terms of Capitalism, appeals to just those appetites which Capitalism has aroused, and ridicules as fantastic and unheard-of just those things in society the memory of which Capitalism has killed among men wherever the blight of it has spread."
- Hilaire Belloc -
RoyLatham
Posts: 4,488
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7/5/2015 5:23:49 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
You make some good points. Northern New Jersey meets few people's standards for architectural delight. The people are low on dispensing pleasantries, and the State is sinking into the muck of liberal spending, social engineering, and control of everything. I'd choose Texas in a minute. Nonetheless, it's not all downside. The people, in my experience, have a belief in the importance of being competent. The brusque exterior often masks a level of caring. If you are on a ship that's sprung a leak, you could do no better than to have a crew made up of people from New Jersey. The best scenery is in the mountains in the north, the pine barrens, and the coasts.

For the record, the least pleasant people I've ever encountered are in Cambridge, MA, and the area around Boston.

In all these things, we are talking averages. There are delightful exceptions everywhere.
RevNge
Posts: 13,835
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7/5/2015 5:34:36 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/5/2015 5:23:49 PM, RoyLatham wrote:
You make some good points. Northern New Jersey meets few people's standards for architectural delight. The people are low on dispensing pleasantries, and the State is sinking into the muck of liberal spending, social engineering, and control of everything. I'd choose Texas in a minute. Nonetheless, it's not all downside. The people, in my experience, have a belief in the importance of being competent. The brusque exterior often masks a level of caring. If you are on a ship that's sprung a leak, you could do no better than to have a crew made up of people from New Jersey. The best scenery is in the mountains in the north, the pine barrens, and the coasts.

For the record, the least pleasant people I've ever encountered are in Cambridge, MA, and the area around Boston.

Goddamn it, I'm hoping to go to your alma mater, lol.
Harper
Posts: 374
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7/5/2015 11:34:12 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/4/2015 10:53:13 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 6/30/2015 3:32:22 PM, Harper wrote:

I live in eastern Pennylvania, and like to picture us as Gondor, the Delaware as the River Anduin, and Newark, Trenton, and Camden as the Morannon, Barad-dur, and Minas Morghul, respectively. I suppose that the Jersey Shore would be Umbar. But yeah, I try not to cross the river.
Yes, only it's hardly as exciting!
Harper
Posts: 374
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7/5/2015 11:54:13 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/5/2015 5:23:49 PM, RoyLatham wrote:
You make some good points. Northern New Jersey meets few people's standards for architectural delight. The people are low on dispensing pleasantries, and the State is sinking into the muck of liberal spending, social engineering, and control of everything. I'd choose Texas in a minute.
I don't know who wouldn't choose Texas over NJ. No comparison-- like "Hyperion to a satyr", as Hamlet would put it.

Nonetheless, it's not all downside.
I would agree-- for example, the school system here (at least in Union County) is quite good. The teachers at the high school in my township are almost over qualified and are generally friendly. No place is all negatives, the only question here is whether those benefits outweigh the costs, and I would give a emphatic no to that, for all of the reasons I previously listed.

The people, in my experience, have a belief in the importance of being competent. The brusque exterior often masks a level of caring. If you are on a ship that's sprung a leak, you could do no better than to have a crew made up of people from New Jersey.
In that case, our experiences are starkly different. My mother, for example, needed a bridge done and has been coming and going from dentist to dentist for the past 6 months and really all any of them have done was screw over her dental situation even more with each visit. Also, we have been trying to find a good realtor to help us finally settle here since we moved, and each one (without fail) either stops responding to our calls and e-mails or is flat out no help at all. This is not the first time we had dentists or realtors and I can testify that I have never met a more incompetent bunch. Perhaps this is just an issue with folks from Union County.

The best scenery is in the mountains in the north, the pine barrens, and the coasts.
If it's one thing I will not dispute, is the fact that the natural life is beyond what you would find in much of (southern) Texas. My father (a biologist himself) brought me along with him to a BioBlitz event in Watchung reservation and it was such a starkly beautiful place. The shame is that we do not live very close to any of the nice scenery.

For the record, the least pleasant people I've ever encountered are in Cambridge, MA, and the area around Boston.
Really? What made them so unpleasant for you?

In all these things, we are talking averages. There are delightful exceptions everywhere.
Of course.
RoyLatham
Posts: 4,488
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7/6/2015 11:33:33 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 7/5/2015 11:54:13 PM, Harper wrote:
At 7/5/2015 5:23:49 PM, RoyLatham wrote:

In that case, our experiences are starkly different. [about competence.] My mother, for example, needed a bridge done ...

Remember Sturgeon's Law: "90% of everything is crud." These days, I'm thinking Sturgeon was an optimist. I don't know if you are just getting an unlucky sample, or I was getting a lucky sample, or things have changed a lot in the past few decades.

For the record, the least pleasant people I've ever encountered are in Cambridge, MA, and the area around Boston.
Really? What made them so unpleasant for you?

They are experts at being unhelpful. If you present a problem, the reaction is likely to be "Well, that's your problem." They are insular, self-centered, and arrogant.

I have an in-law who is a professor at Harvard. He's a very nice guy, but he has a habit of being a stickler for precision. I said, "Its been raining all week." and he replied, "No, actually it cleared up for an hour on late Tuesday morning." I later said, "The people in Cambridge are the most unpleasant on earth." He said, "You, of course, are correct."

I recently had contact with a guy who moved to the Boston suburbs. He reported that outside city, the people we just fine.