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Exchange Student

Foxian
Posts: 53
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9/14/2015 12:01:32 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
Background information:
I'm originally from China but I'm currently staying the United States as an exchange student for one school year.
(http://sunnewsandreview.com...) The link just before this is just extra information for anyone curious.

The Chinese (Mandarin) language class I'm in is entirely composed of exchange students from China and because of that our teacher assigned us a project in which we have to share about our time in the United States so far.
So I'm going to leave this here and if you're curious about anything feel free to ask, you can ask things such as: "Have you been had any problems with communicating with people in the United States? ".
As long as the questions involve experiences in the United States or comparing something about China to the United States, they should be fine.

This isn't my primary source for the project, but just an extra one because this project seems like it should be fun.

If you ask any questions then thank you!
If you read all this thank you also!
Finally, I apologize for my bad English and the many simple grammar errors I most likely made.
Foxian
Posts: 53
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9/15/2015 1:05:03 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/14/2015 9:37:33 PM, triangle.128k wrote:
How is school in the US different from China?
One of the biggest differences is that school in the United States isn't as test taking focused, in China, middle and high schools focus purely on test taking to prepare us for the zhongkao and the gaokao, in the United States test taking is an important thing but there is also emphasis on real life application of what's taught.

The ability to have selection over your courses is a big thing also, in China the only selection we got was for electives and physical education. High schools in China are divided in tiers and the tier of school you go to is determined by your zhongkao score, a high tier school such as the one I attended has an education system comparable to South Korea and low tier school isn't too comparable. In the United States (at the school I attend at least) there's variation of courses, you can take an advanced English class or a basic one, you can take a math class a year or two ahead of your peers, in China, we all take the same core classes which makes the tier of school incredibly important for our education.

Relationships are also a big thing, in China, the overwhelming majority of students don't think about things such as romance because education takes priority over that, In the United States, there's a lot of high school relationships from what I've seen at the school I attend which just amazes me.

Teacher-student relationships are also different, in the United States the interaction a student has with a teacher seems much more dependent on the student, In China the interaction with a teacher is much more dependent on the teacher, for most students in China all of our teachers become a friend to us, they help mentor us and prepare for what's to come. In the United States teachers feel more distant (probably because there's somewhat of a language barrier between us) they seem more like they're just there to teach and give assignments.

Those are some the biggest differences I've noticed between the two, if I didn't go over an area you wanted feel free ask about it.
Thank you for the question!
beng100
Posts: 1,055
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9/16/2015 12:08:49 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/14/2015 12:01:32 AM, Foxian wrote:
Background information:
I'm originally from China but I'm currently staying the United States as an exchange student for one school year.
(http://sunnewsandreview.com...) The link just before this is just extra information for anyone curious.

The Chinese (Mandarin) language class I'm in is entirely composed of exchange students from China and because of that our teacher assigned us a project in which we have to share about our time in the United States so far.
So I'm going to leave this here and if you're curious about anything feel free to ask, you can ask things such as: "Have you been had any problems with communicating with people in the United States? ".
As long as the questions involve experiences in the United States or comparing something about China to the United States, they should be fine.

This isn't my primary source for the project, but just an extra one because this project seems like it should be fun.

If you ask any questions then thank you!
If you read all this thank you also!
Finally, I apologize for my bad English and the many simple grammar errors I most likely made.

Firstly your English is fine, would never have known it is not your first language. The question I would like to ask is how do people in China generally feel about the one child policy? Do you think it is a good idea?
RoyLatham
Posts: 4,488
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9/16/2015 5:02:22 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
Why would students already fluent in Mandarin be taking a class on how to speak Mandarin? Or am I misunderstanding?

What is the most remarkable thing you have noticed about America? Many visitors from China used to be surprised by the profusion of consumer goods here, as in supermarkets. Has China changed so that is no longer the case?
PetersSmith
Posts: 5,839
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9/16/2015 5:08:58 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/14/2015 12:01:32 AM, Foxian wrote:
Background information:
I'm originally from China but I'm currently staying the United States as an exchange student for one school year.
(http://sunnewsandreview.com...) The link just before this is just extra information for anyone curious.

The Chinese (Mandarin) language class I'm in is entirely composed of exchange students from China and because of that our teacher assigned us a project in which we have to share about our time in the United States so far.
So I'm going to leave this here and if you're curious about anything feel free to ask, you can ask things such as: "Have you been had any problems with communicating with people in the United States? ".
As long as the questions involve experiences in the United States or comparing something about China to the United States, they should be fine.

This isn't my primary source for the project, but just an extra one because this project seems like it should be fun.

If you ask any questions then thank you!
If you read all this thank you also!
Finally, I apologize for my bad English and the many simple grammar errors I most likely made.

Why do non-native English speakers who speak English perfectly well always say "I apologize for my bad English"?
Empress of DDO (also Poll and Forum "Maintenance" Moderator)

"The two most important days in your life is the day you were born, and the day you find out why."
~Mark Twain

"Wow"
-Doge

"Don't believe everything you read on the internet just because there's a picture with a quote next to it."
~Abraham Lincoln

Guide to the Polls Section: http://www.debate.org...
SamStevens
Posts: 3,819
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9/16/2015 5:16:30 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/16/2015 5:08:58 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/14/2015 12:01:32 AM, Foxian wrote:
Background information:
I'm originally from China but I'm currently staying the United States as an exchange student for one school year.
(http://sunnewsandreview.com...) The link just before this is just extra information for anyone curious.

The Chinese (Mandarin) language class I'm in is entirely composed of exchange students from China and because of that our teacher assigned us a project in which we have to share about our time in the United States so far.
So I'm going to leave this here and if you're curious about anything feel free to ask, you can ask things such as: "Have you been had any problems with communicating with people in the United States? ".
As long as the questions involve experiences in the United States or comparing something about China to the United States, they should be fine.

This isn't my primary source for the project, but just an extra one because this project seems like it should be fun.

If you ask any questions then thank you!
If you read all this thank you also!
Finally, I apologize for my bad English and the many simple grammar errors I most likely made.

Why do non-native English speakers who speak English perfectly well always say "I apologize for my bad English"?

If they are a non native English speaker, do you think they know they speak good English?
"This is the true horror of religion. It allows perfectly decent and sane people to believe by the billions, what only lunatics could believe on their own." Sam Harris
Life asked Death "Why do people love me but hate you?"
Death responded: "Because you are a beautiful lie, and I am the painful truth."
PetersSmith
Posts: 5,839
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9/16/2015 5:17:36 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/16/2015 5:16:30 AM, SamStevens wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:08:58 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/14/2015 12:01:32 AM, Foxian wrote:
Background information:
I'm originally from China but I'm currently staying the United States as an exchange student for one school year.
(http://sunnewsandreview.com...) The link just before this is just extra information for anyone curious.

The Chinese (Mandarin) language class I'm in is entirely composed of exchange students from China and because of that our teacher assigned us a project in which we have to share about our time in the United States so far.
So I'm going to leave this here and if you're curious about anything feel free to ask, you can ask things such as: "Have you been had any problems with communicating with people in the United States? ".
As long as the questions involve experiences in the United States or comparing something about China to the United States, they should be fine.

This isn't my primary source for the project, but just an extra one because this project seems like it should be fun.

If you ask any questions then thank you!
If you read all this thank you also!
Finally, I apologize for my bad English and the many simple grammar errors I most likely made.

Why do non-native English speakers who speak English perfectly well always say "I apologize for my bad English"?

If they are a non native English speaker, do you think they know they speak good English?

Do you think they know they speak English well*
Empress of DDO (also Poll and Forum "Maintenance" Moderator)

"The two most important days in your life is the day you were born, and the day you find out why."
~Mark Twain

"Wow"
-Doge

"Don't believe everything you read on the internet just because there's a picture with a quote next to it."
~Abraham Lincoln

Guide to the Polls Section: http://www.debate.org...
SamStevens
Posts: 3,819
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9/16/2015 5:18:51 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/16/2015 5:17:36 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:16:30 AM, SamStevens wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:08:58 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/14/2015 12:01:32 AM, Foxian wrote:
Background information:
I'm originally from China but I'm currently staying the United States as an exchange student for one school year.
(http://sunnewsandreview.com...) The link just before this is just extra information for anyone curious.

The Chinese (Mandarin) language class I'm in is entirely composed of exchange students from China and because of that our teacher assigned us a project in which we have to share about our time in the United States so far.
So I'm going to leave this here and if you're curious about anything feel free to ask, you can ask things such as: "Have you been had any problems with communicating with people in the United States? ".
As long as the questions involve experiences in the United States or comparing something about China to the United States, they should be fine.

This isn't my primary source for the project, but just an extra one because this project seems like it should be fun.

If you ask any questions then thank you!
If you read all this thank you also!
Finally, I apologize for my bad English and the many simple grammar errors I most likely made.

Why do non-native English speakers who speak English perfectly well always say "I apologize for my bad English"?

If they are a non native English speaker, do you think they know they speak good English?

Do you think they know they speak English well*

http://i3.kym-cdn.com...
"This is the true horror of religion. It allows perfectly decent and sane people to believe by the billions, what only lunatics could believe on their own." Sam Harris
Life asked Death "Why do people love me but hate you?"
Death responded: "Because you are a beautiful lie, and I am the painful truth."
PetersSmith
Posts: 5,839
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9/16/2015 5:20:21 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/16/2015 5:18:51 AM, SamStevens wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:17:36 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:16:30 AM, SamStevens wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:08:58 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/14/2015 12:01:32 AM, Foxian wrote:
Background information:
I'm originally from China but I'm currently staying the United States as an exchange student for one school year.
(http://sunnewsandreview.com...) The link just before this is just extra information for anyone curious.

The Chinese (Mandarin) language class I'm in is entirely composed of exchange students from China and because of that our teacher assigned us a project in which we have to share about our time in the United States so far.
So I'm going to leave this here and if you're curious about anything feel free to ask, you can ask things such as: "Have you been had any problems with communicating with people in the United States? ".
As long as the questions involve experiences in the United States or comparing something about China to the United States, they should be fine.

This isn't my primary source for the project, but just an extra one because this project seems like it should be fun.

If you ask any questions then thank you!
If you read all this thank you also!
Finally, I apologize for my bad English and the many simple grammar errors I most likely made.

Why do non-native English speakers who speak English perfectly well always say "I apologize for my bad English"?

If they are a non native English speaker, do you think they know they speak good English?

Do you think they know they speak English well*

http://i3.kym-cdn.com...

Grammatik macht frei.
Empress of DDO (also Poll and Forum "Maintenance" Moderator)

"The two most important days in your life is the day you were born, and the day you find out why."
~Mark Twain

"Wow"
-Doge

"Don't believe everything you read on the internet just because there's a picture with a quote next to it."
~Abraham Lincoln

Guide to the Polls Section: http://www.debate.org...
SamStevens
Posts: 3,819
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9/16/2015 5:30:51 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/16/2015 5:20:21 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:18:51 AM, SamStevens wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:17:36 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:16:30 AM, SamStevens wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:08:58 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/14/2015 12:01:32 AM, Foxian wrote:
Background information:
I'm originally from China but I'm currently staying the United States as an exchange student for one school year.
(http://sunnewsandreview.com...) The link just before this is just extra information for anyone curious.

The Chinese (Mandarin) language class I'm in is entirely composed of exchange students from China and because of that our teacher assigned us a project in which we have to share about our time in the United States so far.
So I'm going to leave this here and if you're curious about anything feel free to ask, you can ask things such as: "Have you been had any problems with communicating with people in the United States? ".
As long as the questions involve experiences in the United States or comparing something about China to the United States, they should be fine.

This isn't my primary source for the project, but just an extra one because this project seems like it should be fun.

If you ask any questions then thank you!
If you read all this thank you also!
Finally, I apologize for my bad English and the many simple grammar errors I most likely made.

Why do non-native English speakers who speak English perfectly well always say "I apologize for my bad English"?

If they are a non native English speaker, do you think they know they speak good English?

Do you think they know they speak English well*

http://i3.kym-cdn.com...

Grammatik macht frei.

Keine Antwort auf meine Frage?
"This is the true horror of religion. It allows perfectly decent and sane people to believe by the billions, what only lunatics could believe on their own." Sam Harris
Life asked Death "Why do people love me but hate you?"
Death responded: "Because you are a beautiful lie, and I am the painful truth."
SamStevens
Posts: 3,819
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9/16/2015 5:42:05 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/16/2015 5:20:21 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:18:51 AM, SamStevens wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:17:36 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:16:30 AM, SamStevens wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:08:58 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/14/2015 12:01:32 AM, Foxian wrote:
Background information:
I'm originally from China but I'm currently staying the United States as an exchange student for one school year.
(http://sunnewsandreview.com...) The link just before this is just extra information for anyone curious.

The Chinese (Mandarin) language class I'm in is entirely composed of exchange students from China and because of that our teacher assigned us a project in which we have to share about our time in the United States so far.
So I'm going to leave this here and if you're curious about anything feel free to ask, you can ask things such as: "Have you been had any problems with communicating with people in the United States? ".
As long as the questions involve experiences in the United States or comparing something about China to the United States, they should be fine.

This isn't my primary source for the project, but just an extra one because this project seems like it should be fun.

If you ask any questions then thank you!
If you read all this thank you also!
Finally, I apologize for my bad English and the many simple grammar errors I most likely made.

Why do non-native English speakers who speak English perfectly well always say "I apologize for my bad English"?

If they are a non native English speaker, do you think they know they speak good English?

Do you think they know they speak English well*

http://i3.kym-cdn.com...

Grammatik macht frei.

So, how is a non native speaker supposed to know?
"This is the true horror of religion. It allows perfectly decent and sane people to believe by the billions, what only lunatics could believe on their own." Sam Harris
Life asked Death "Why do people love me but hate you?"
Death responded: "Because you are a beautiful lie, and I am the painful truth."
Foxian
Posts: 53
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9/19/2015 12:59:26 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/16/2015 12:08:49 AM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/14/2015 12:01:32 AM, Foxian wrote:
Background information:
I'm originally from China but I'm currently staying the United States as an exchange student for one school year.
(http://sunnewsandreview.com...) The link just before this is just extra information for anyone curious.

The Chinese (Mandarin) language class I'm in is entirely composed of exchange students from China and because of that our teacher assigned us a project in which we have to share about our time in the United States so far.
So I'm going to leave this here and if you're curious about anything feel free to ask, you can ask things such as: "Have you been had any problems with communicating with people in the United States? ".
As long as the questions involve experiences in the United States or comparing something about China to the United States, they should be fine.

This isn't my primary source for the project, but just an extra one because this project seems like it should be fun.

If you ask any questions then thank you!
If you read all this thank you also!
Finally, I apologize for my bad English and the many simple grammar errors I most likely made.

Firstly your English is fine, would never have known it is not your first language. The question I would like to ask is how do people in China generally feel about the one child policy? Do you think it is a good idea?
In China people generally support the one child policy, it was implemented for good reason but eventually began to do harm and with many more exceptions being made for it, it still is supported by the majority of Chinese.
Personally I'm a supporter of it, I think it was a good idea that it was put into place and think it's a good idea to still have it but have exceptions like it does now.
Some common exceptions for the one child policy that people apply under are: the first child is a daughter (that's why I have a younger brother), family has military service history, ethnic minority (also why I have a younger brother), and being in a more rural province.

I'm sorry for the late response, I've been preoccupied with test the last couple days and haven't been on this site.
Thank you for the question!
Foxian
Posts: 53
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9/19/2015 1:08:44 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/16/2015 5:02:22 AM, RoyLatham wrote:
Why would students already fluent in Mandarin be taking a class on how to speak Mandarin? Or am I misunderstanding?
The school we attend requires students to take a foreign language and we're treated like normal students that attend the school so we have to also take a foreign language class. We're already in a different country that speaks a language we're not fluent in so we all decided to take the Chinese class our school offers rather than take something such as Spanish.

What is the most remarkable thing you have noticed about America?
The most remarkable thing I've noticed in the United States is probably how physical people are, in China I rarely hugged my own parents and I walk around school or everywhere actually and see people hugging and kissing which is really different than China.

Many visitors from China used to be surprised by the profusion of consumer goods here, as in supermarkets. Has China changed so that is no longer the case?
I'd say it's probably about the same, it may have improved a bit but not much probably.

I'm sorry for the late response, I've been preoccupied with test the last couple days and have not been on this site.
Thank you for the question!
Foxian
Posts: 53
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9/19/2015 1:15:46 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/16/2015 5:08:58 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/14/2015 12:01:32 AM, Foxian wrote:
Background information:
I'm originally from China but I'm currently staying the United States as an exchange student for one school year.
(http://sunnewsandreview.com...) The link just before this is just extra information for anyone curious.

The Chinese (Mandarin) language class I'm in is entirely composed of exchange students from China and because of that our teacher assigned us a project in which we have to share about our time in the United States so far.
So I'm going to leave this here and if you're curious about anything feel free to ask, you can ask things such as: "Have you been had any problems with communicating with people in the United States? ".
As long as the questions involve experiences in the United States or comparing something about China to the United States, they should be fine.

This isn't my primary source for the project, but just an extra one because this project seems like it should be fun.

If you ask any questions then thank you!
If you read all this thank you also!
Finally, I apologize for my bad English and the many simple grammar errors I most likely made.

Why do non-native English speakers who speak English perfectly well always say "I apologize for my bad English"?
Personally I don't think my English is that good, which is why I apologize for it. Most non-native speakers of a language probably would also think that they're not good at the language.

I'm sorry for the late response, I've been preoccupied lately and haven't been going on the site.
Thank you for the question!
PetersSmith
Posts: 5,839
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9/19/2015 1:28:45 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/19/2015 1:15:46 AM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:08:58 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/14/2015 12:01:32 AM, Foxian wrote:
Background information:
I'm originally from China but I'm currently staying the United States as an exchange student for one school year.
(http://sunnewsandreview.com...) The link just before this is just extra information for anyone curious.

The Chinese (Mandarin) language class I'm in is entirely composed of exchange students from China and because of that our teacher assigned us a project in which we have to share about our time in the United States so far.
So I'm going to leave this here and if you're curious about anything feel free to ask, you can ask things such as: "Have you been had any problems with communicating with people in the United States? ".
As long as the questions involve experiences in the United States or comparing something about China to the United States, they should be fine.

This isn't my primary source for the project, but just an extra one because this project seems like it should be fun.

If you ask any questions then thank you!
If you read all this thank you also!
Finally, I apologize for my bad English and the many simple grammar errors I most likely made.

Why do non-native English speakers who speak English perfectly well always say "I apologize for my bad English"?
Personally I don't think my English is that good, which is why I apologize for it. Most non-native speakers of a language probably would also think that they're not good at the language.

I'm sorry for the late response, I've been preoccupied lately and haven't been going on the site.
Thank you for the question!

Better at it than I am.
Empress of DDO (also Poll and Forum "Maintenance" Moderator)

"The two most important days in your life is the day you were born, and the day you find out why."
~Mark Twain

"Wow"
-Doge

"Don't believe everything you read on the internet just because there's a picture with a quote next to it."
~Abraham Lincoln

Guide to the Polls Section: http://www.debate.org...
beng100
Posts: 1,055
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9/19/2015 7:23:54 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/19/2015 12:59:26 AM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/16/2015 12:08:49 AM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/14/2015 12:01:32 AM, Foxian wrote:
Background information:
I'm originally from China but I'm currently staying the United States as an exchange student for one school year.
(http://sunnewsandreview.com...) The link just before this is just extra information for anyone curious.

The Chinese (Mandarin) language class I'm in is entirely composed of exchange students from China and because of that our teacher assigned us a project in which we have to share about our time in the United States so far.
So I'm going to leave this here and if you're curious about anything feel free to ask, you can ask things such as: "Have you been had any problems with communicating with people in the United States? ".
As long as the questions involve experiences in the United States or comparing something about China to the United States, they should be fine.

This isn't my primary source for the project, but just an extra one because this project seems like it should be fun.

If you ask any questions then thank you!
If you read all this thank you also!
Finally, I apologize for my bad English and the many simple grammar errors I most likely made.

Firstly your English is fine, would never have known it is not your first language. The question I would like to ask is how do people in China generally feel about the one child policy? Do you think it is a good idea?
In China people generally support the one child policy, it was implemented for good reason but eventually began to do harm and with many more exceptions being made for it, it still is supported by the majority of Chinese.
Personally I'm a supporter of it, I think it was a good idea that it was put into place and think it's a good idea to still have it but have exceptions like it does now.
Some common exceptions for the one child policy that people apply under are: the first child is a daughter (that's why I have a younger brother), family has military service history, ethnic minority (also why I have a younger brother), and being in a more rural province.

I'm sorry for the late response, I've been preoccupied with test the last couple days and haven't been on this site.
Thank you for the question!

That's interesting. I actually think a 1 child policy is a good idea to deal with rapid population growth. It should be implemented in many other countries with high levels of unsustainable population growth I believe. The down side is obviously the families desperate for a son who may in rare occasions, reject or murder a baby girl in desperation to achieve this. The allowances you suggested are happening in China seem a good idea but would lead to a skewed population with males significantly outnumbering females. Is this currently the case among the people in China born after the one child policies implementation?
RoyLatham
Posts: 4,488
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9/19/2015 4:23:32 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/19/2015 1:08:44 AM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:02:22 AM, RoyLatham wrote:
Why would students already fluent in Mandarin be taking a class on how to speak Mandarin? Or am I misunderstanding?
The school we attend requires students to take a foreign language and we're treated like normal students that attend the school so we have to also take a foreign language class. We're already in a different country that speaks a language we're not fluent in so we all decided to take the Chinese class our school offers rather than take something such as Spanish.

I should have guessed. The school is foolish not to waive the requirement.

What is the most remarkable thing you have noticed about America?
The most remarkable thing I've noticed in the United States is probably how physical people are, in China I rarely hugged my own parents and I walk around school or everywhere actually and see people hugging and kissing which is really different than China.

Researchers have studied how physical a culture is by observing people talking informally for about ten minutes, say in restaurants, and counting how many times they touched each other. Americans has a score of around four or five. The British had a score of zero, which I'm sure the Chinese and Japanese would match. People from Caribbean countries were in the hundreds, quite a surprise to Americans.
triangle.128k
Posts: 3,642
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9/20/2015 4:41:59 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/15/2015 1:05:03 AM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/14/2015 9:37:33 PM, triangle.128k wrote:
How is school in the US different from China?
The ability to have selection over your courses is a big thing also, in China the only selection we got was for electives and physical education. High schools in China are divided in tiers and the tier of school you go to is determined by your zhongkao score, a high tier school such as the one I attended has an education system comparable to South Korea and low tier school isn't too comparable. In the United States (at the school I attend at least) there's variation of courses, you can take an advanced English class or a basic one, you can take a math class a year or two ahead of your peers, in China, we all take the same core classes which makes the tier of school incredibly important for our education.

Which level in the US do you think is closest to the difficulty of the courses in China? Like, do you think the advanced courses in certain subjects are comparable to the difficulty of the courses in China?
Foxian
Posts: 53
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9/20/2015 5:54:25 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/19/2015 4:23:32 PM, RoyLatham wrote:
At 9/19/2015 1:08:44 AM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:02:22 AM, RoyLatham wrote:
Why would students already fluent in Mandarin be taking a class on how to speak Mandarin? Or am I misunderstanding?
The school we attend requires students to take a foreign language and we're treated like normal students that attend the school so we have to also take a foreign language class. We're already in a different country that speaks a language we're not fluent in so we all decided to take the Chinese class our school offers rather than take something such as Spanish.

I should have guessed. The school is foolish not to waive the requirement.

What is the most remarkable thing you have noticed about America?
The most remarkable thing I've noticed in the United States is probably how physical people are, in China I rarely hugged my own parents and I walk around school or everywhere actually and see people hugging and kissing which is really different than China.

Researchers have studied how physical a culture is by observing people talking informally for about ten minutes, say in restaurants, and counting how many times they touched each other. Americans has a score of around four or five. The British had a score of zero, which I'm sure the Chinese and Japanese would match. People from Caribbean countries were in the hundreds, quite a surprise to Americans.
The Caribbean countries sound scary, I already see the United States as being too physical, I can't imagine how a country can get more physical.
Foxian
Posts: 53
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9/20/2015 5:55:27 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/19/2015 1:28:45 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/19/2015 1:15:46 AM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:08:58 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/14/2015 12:01:32 AM, Foxian wrote:
Background information:
I'm originally from China but I'm currently staying the United States as an exchange student for one school year.
(http://sunnewsandreview.com...) The link just before this is just extra information for anyone curious.

The Chinese (Mandarin) language class I'm in is entirely composed of exchange students from China and because of that our teacher assigned us a project in which we have to share about our time in the United States so far.
So I'm going to leave this here and if you're curious about anything feel free to ask, you can ask things such as: "Have you been had any problems with communicating with people in the United States? ".
As long as the questions involve experiences in the United States or comparing something about China to the United States, they should be fine.

This isn't my primary source for the project, but just an extra one because this project seems like it should be fun.

If you ask any questions then thank you!
If you read all this thank you also!
Finally, I apologize for my bad English and the many simple grammar errors I most likely made.

Why do non-native English speakers who speak English perfectly well always say "I apologize for my bad English"?
Personally I don't think my English is that good, which is why I apologize for it. Most non-native speakers of a language probably would also think that they're not good at the language.

I'm sorry for the late response, I've been preoccupied lately and haven't been going on the site.
Thank you for the question!

Better at it than I am.
I can guarantee I'm not, my English essays are horrendous.
Foxian
Posts: 53
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9/20/2015 5:59:43 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/19/2015 7:23:54 AM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/19/2015 12:59:26 AM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/16/2015 12:08:49 AM, beng100 wrote:
At 9/14/2015 12:01:32 AM, Foxian wrote:
Background information:
I'm originally from China but I'm currently staying the United States as an exchange student for one school year.
(http://sunnewsandreview.com...) The link just before this is just extra information for anyone curious.

The Chinese (Mandarin) language class I'm in is entirely composed of exchange students from China and because of that our teacher assigned us a project in which we have to share about our time in the United States so far.
So I'm going to leave this here and if you're curious about anything feel free to ask, you can ask things such as: "Have you been had any problems with communicating with people in the United States? ".
As long as the questions involve experiences in the United States or comparing something about China to the United States, they should be fine.

This isn't my primary source for the project, but just an extra one because this project seems like it should be fun.

If you ask any questions then thank you!
If you read all this thank you also!
Finally, I apologize for my bad English and the many simple grammar errors I most likely made.

Firstly your English is fine, would never have known it is not your first language. The question I would like to ask is how do people in China generally feel about the one child policy? Do you think it is a good idea?
In China people generally support the one child policy, it was implemented for good reason but eventually began to do harm and with many more exceptions being made for it, it still is supported by the majority of Chinese.
Personally I'm a supporter of it, I think it was a good idea that it was put into place and think it's a good idea to still have it but have exceptions like it does now.
Some common exceptions for the one child policy that people apply under are: the first child is a daughter (that's why I have a younger brother), family has military service history, ethnic minority (also why I have a younger brother), and being in a more rural province.

I'm sorry for the late response, I've been preoccupied with test the last couple days and haven't been on this site.
Thank you for the question!

That's interesting. I actually think a 1 child policy is a good idea to deal with rapid population growth. It should be implemented in many other countries with high levels of unsustainable population growth I believe. The down side is obviously the families desperate for a son who may in rare occasions, reject or murder a baby girl in desperation to achieve this. The allowances you suggested are happening in China seem a good idea but would lead to a skewed population with males significantly outnumbering females. Is this currently the case among the people in China born after the one child policies implementation?
The male to female ratio has suffered since the one child policy implication and that has caused for sex-selective abortion to become illegal in China because it was very widespread when the policy was put into place and in attempts to increase the amount of females in China exceptions like the first child being female may qualify for another child have been put into place.
Foxian
Posts: 53
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9/20/2015 6:04:12 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/20/2015 4:41:59 PM, triangle.128k wrote:
At 9/15/2015 1:05:03 AM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/14/2015 9:37:33 PM, triangle.128k wrote:
How is school in the US different from China?
The ability to have selection over your courses is a big thing also, in China the only selection we got was for electives and physical education. High schools in China are divided in tiers and the tier of school you go to is determined by your zhongkao score, a high tier school such as the one I attended has an education system comparable to South Korea and low tier school isn't too comparable. In the United States (at the school I attend at least) there's variation of courses, you can take an advanced English class or a basic one, you can take a math class a year or two ahead of your peers, in China, we all take the same core classes which makes the tier of school incredibly important for our education.

Which level in the US do you think is closest to the difficulty of the courses in China? Like, do you think the advanced courses in certain subjects are comparable to the difficulty of the courses in China?
Compared to the school I attended the difficulty of the course in the United States seems much easier than China, a lot of the classes don't go as in depth as the school I attended. I can't really compare to all of the schools in China because the tiers make the schools very different education. The AP class system in the United States is the closest thing to being comparable to the school I attended but it's still easier in terms of difficulty of the actually subject.
SamStevens
Posts: 3,819
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9/20/2015 6:13:52 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/20/2015 5:55:27 PM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/19/2015 1:28:45 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/19/2015 1:15:46 AM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:08:58 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/14/2015 12:01:32 AM, Foxian wrote:
Background information:
I'm originally from China but I'm currently staying the United States as an exchange student for one school year.
(http://sunnewsandreview.com...) The link just before this is just extra information for anyone curious.

The Chinese (Mandarin) language class I'm in is entirely composed of exchange students from China and because of that our teacher assigned us a project in which we have to share about our time in the United States so far.
So I'm going to leave this here and if you're curious about anything feel free to ask, you can ask things such as: "Have you been had any problems with communicating with people in the United States? ".
As long as the questions involve experiences in the United States or comparing something about China to the United States, they should be fine.

This isn't my primary source for the project, but just an extra one because this project seems like it should be fun.

If you ask any questions then thank you!
If you read all this thank you also!
Finally, I apologize for my bad English and the many simple grammar errors I most likely made.

Why do non-native English speakers who speak English perfectly well always say "I apologize for my bad English"?
Personally I don't think my English is that good, which is why I apologize for it. Most non-native speakers of a language probably would also think that they're not good at the language.

I'm sorry for the late response, I've been preoccupied lately and haven't been going on the site.
Thank you for the question!

Better at it than I am.
I can guarantee I'm not, my English essays are horrendous.

Do you receive bad grades on said essays due to incorrect grammar?
"This is the true horror of religion. It allows perfectly decent and sane people to believe by the billions, what only lunatics could believe on their own." Sam Harris
Life asked Death "Why do people love me but hate you?"
Death responded: "Because you are a beautiful lie, and I am the painful truth."
triangle.128k
Posts: 3,642
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9/20/2015 6:36:38 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/20/2015 6:04:12 PM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/20/2015 4:41:59 PM, triangle.128k wrote:
At 9/15/2015 1:05:03 AM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/14/2015 9:37:33 PM, triangle.128k wrote:
How is school in the US different from China?
The ability to have selection over your courses is a big thing also, in China the only selection we got was for electives and physical education. High schools in China are divided in tiers and the tier of school you go to is determined by your zhongkao score, a high tier school such as the one I attended has an education system comparable to South Korea and low tier school isn't too comparable. In the United States (at the school I attend at least) there's variation of courses, you can take an advanced English class or a basic one, you can take a math class a year or two ahead of your peers, in China, we all take the same core classes which makes the tier of school incredibly important for our education.

Which level in the US do you think is closest to the difficulty of the courses in China? Like, do you think the advanced courses in certain subjects are comparable to the difficulty of the courses in China?
Compared to the school I attended the difficulty of the course in the United States seems much easier than China, a lot of the classes don't go as in depth as the school I attended. I can't really compare to all of the schools in China because the tiers make the schools very different education. The AP class system in the United States is the closest thing to being comparable to the school I attended but it's still easier in terms of difficulty of the actually subject.

It might depend where you are, many places in the US have better education than others. What state are you studying in?

Also, are there chances for after-school activities in China? Or is there too much work in place?
PetersSmith
Posts: 5,839
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9/20/2015 6:38:50 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/20/2015 5:55:27 PM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/19/2015 1:28:45 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/19/2015 1:15:46 AM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:08:58 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/14/2015 12:01:32 AM, Foxian wrote:
Background information:
I'm originally from China but I'm currently staying the United States as an exchange student for one school year.
(http://sunnewsandreview.com...) The link just before this is just extra information for anyone curious.

The Chinese (Mandarin) language class I'm in is entirely composed of exchange students from China and because of that our teacher assigned us a project in which we have to share about our time in the United States so far.
So I'm going to leave this here and if you're curious about anything feel free to ask, you can ask things such as: "Have you been had any problems with communicating with people in the United States? ".
As long as the questions involve experiences in the United States or comparing something about China to the United States, they should be fine.

This isn't my primary source for the project, but just an extra one because this project seems like it should be fun.

If you ask any questions then thank you!
If you read all this thank you also!
Finally, I apologize for my bad English and the many simple grammar errors I most likely made.

Why do non-native English speakers who speak English perfectly well always say "I apologize for my bad English"?
Personally I don't think my English is that good, which is why I apologize for it. Most non-native speakers of a language probably would also think that they're not good at the language.

I'm sorry for the late response, I've been preoccupied lately and haven't been going on the site.
Thank you for the question!

Better at it than I am.
I can guarantee I'm not, my English essays are horrendous.

Horrendous by Asian standards? As in if you get a "B" you failed miserably?
Empress of DDO (also Poll and Forum "Maintenance" Moderator)

"The two most important days in your life is the day you were born, and the day you find out why."
~Mark Twain

"Wow"
-Doge

"Don't believe everything you read on the internet just because there's a picture with a quote next to it."
~Abraham Lincoln

Guide to the Polls Section: http://www.debate.org...
Foxian
Posts: 53
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9/20/2015 6:53:15 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/20/2015 6:36:38 PM, triangle.128k wrote:
At 9/20/2015 6:04:12 PM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/20/2015 4:41:59 PM, triangle.128k wrote:
At 9/15/2015 1:05:03 AM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/14/2015 9:37:33 PM, triangle.128k wrote:
How is school in the US different from China?
The ability to have selection over your courses is a big thing also, in China the only selection we got was for electives and physical education. High schools in China are divided in tiers and the tier of school you go to is determined by your zhongkao score, a high tier school such as the one I attended has an education system comparable to South Korea and low tier school isn't too comparable. In the United States (at the school I attend at least) there's variation of courses, you can take an advanced English class or a basic one, you can take a math class a year or two ahead of your peers, in China, we all take the same core classes which makes the tier of school incredibly important for our education.

Which level in the US do you think is closest to the difficulty of the courses in China? Like, do you think the advanced courses in certain subjects are comparable to the difficulty of the courses in China?
Compared to the school I attended the difficulty of the course in the United States seems much easier than China, a lot of the classes don't go as in depth as the school I attended. I can't really compare to all of the schools in China because the tiers make the schools very different education. The AP class system in the United States is the closest thing to being comparable to the school I attended but it's still easier in terms of difficulty of the actually subject.

It might depend where you are, many places in the US have better education than others. What state are you studying in?
I am studying in California.

Also, are there chances for after-school activities in China? Or is there too much work in place?
Generally the higher tier the school in China the higher percentage of people involved in after-school activities. The amount of homework we get is often exaggerated, the most we'll ever get in one day is maybe 4 hours. That may sound like a lot compared to the United States but we're often able to get half done at school during our breaks, our breaks are normally 2 hours long. At the school I attended I never met a student who wasn't involved in any type of after school activity.
Foxian
Posts: 53
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9/20/2015 6:59:50 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/20/2015 6:13:52 PM, SamStevens wrote:
At 9/20/2015 5:55:27 PM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/19/2015 1:28:45 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/19/2015 1:15:46 AM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:08:58 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/14/2015 12:01:32 AM, Foxian wrote:
Background information:
I'm originally from China but I'm currently staying the United States as an exchange student for one school year.
(http://sunnewsandreview.com...) The link just before this is just extra information for anyone curious.

The Chinese (Mandarin) language class I'm in is entirely composed of exchange students from China and because of that our teacher assigned us a project in which we have to share about our time in the United States so far.
So I'm going to leave this here and if you're curious about anything feel free to ask, you can ask things such as: "Have you been had any problems with communicating with people in the United States? ".
As long as the questions involve experiences in the United States or comparing something about China to the United States, they should be fine.

This isn't my primary source for the project, but just an extra one because this project seems like it should be fun.

If you ask any questions then thank you!
If you read all this thank you also!
Finally, I apologize for my bad English and the many simple grammar errors I most likely made.

Why do non-native English speakers who speak English perfectly well always say "I apologize for my bad English"?
Personally I don't think my English is that good, which is why I apologize for it. Most non-native speakers of a language probably would also think that they're not good at the language.

I'm sorry for the late response, I've been preoccupied lately and haven't been going on the site.
Thank you for the question!

Better at it than I am.
I can guarantee I'm not, my English essays are horrendous.

Do you receive bad grades on said essays due to incorrect grammar?
That's probably a large factor in it.
Foxian
Posts: 53
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9/20/2015 7:00:04 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/20/2015 6:38:50 PM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/20/2015 5:55:27 PM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/19/2015 1:28:45 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/19/2015 1:15:46 AM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:08:58 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/14/2015 12:01:32 AM, Foxian wrote:
Background information:
I'm originally from China but I'm currently staying the United States as an exchange student for one school year.
(http://sunnewsandreview.com...) The link just before this is just extra information for anyone curious.

The Chinese (Mandarin) language class I'm in is entirely composed of exchange students from China and because of that our teacher assigned us a project in which we have to share about our time in the United States so far.
So I'm going to leave this here and if you're curious about anything feel free to ask, you can ask things such as: "Have you been had any problems with communicating with people in the United States? ".
As long as the questions involve experiences in the United States or comparing something about China to the United States, they should be fine.

This isn't my primary source for the project, but just an extra one because this project seems like it should be fun.

If you ask any questions then thank you!
If you read all this thank you also!
Finally, I apologize for my bad English and the many simple grammar errors I most likely made.

Why do non-native English speakers who speak English perfectly well always say "I apologize for my bad English"?
Personally I don't think my English is that good, which is why I apologize for it. Most non-native speakers of a language probably would also think that they're not good at the language.

I'm sorry for the late response, I've been preoccupied lately and haven't been going on the site.
Thank you for the question!

Better at it than I am.
I can guarantee I'm not, my English essays are horrendous.

Horrendous by Asian standards? As in if you get a "B" you failed miserably?
This is going to sound stereotypical, but yes. Although the teacher had to bump our grades.
PetersSmith
Posts: 5,839
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9/20/2015 7:00:41 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 9/20/2015 7:00:04 PM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/20/2015 6:38:50 PM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/20/2015 5:55:27 PM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/19/2015 1:28:45 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/19/2015 1:15:46 AM, Foxian wrote:
At 9/16/2015 5:08:58 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 9/14/2015 12:01:32 AM, Foxian wrote:
Background information:
I'm originally from China but I'm currently staying the United States as an exchange student for one school year.
(http://sunnewsandreview.com...) The link just before this is just extra information for anyone curious.

The Chinese (Mandarin) language class I'm in is entirely composed of exchange students from China and because of that our teacher assigned us a project in which we have to share about our time in the United States so far.
So I'm going to leave this here and if you're curious about anything feel free to ask, you can ask things such as: "Have you been had any problems with communicating with people in the United States? ".
As long as the questions involve experiences in the United States or comparing something about China to the United States, they should be fine.

This isn't my primary source for the project, but just an extra one because this project seems like it should be fun.

If you ask any questions then thank you!
If you read all this thank you also!
Finally, I apologize for my bad English and the many simple grammar errors I most likely made.

Why do non-native English speakers who speak English perfectly well always say "I apologize for my bad English"?
Personally I don't think my English is that good, which is why I apologize for it. Most non-native speakers of a language probably would also think that they're not good at the language.

I'm sorry for the late response, I've been preoccupied lately and haven't been going on the site.
Thank you for the question!

Better at it than I am.
I can guarantee I'm not, my English essays are horrendous.

Horrendous by Asian standards? As in if you get a "B" you failed miserably?
This is going to sound stereotypical, but yes. Although the teacher had to bump our grades.

I knew it. You are superior at English, but your standards are so high you never think you're good enough.
Empress of DDO (also Poll and Forum "Maintenance" Moderator)

"The two most important days in your life is the day you were born, and the day you find out why."
~Mark Twain

"Wow"
-Doge

"Don't believe everything you read on the internet just because there's a picture with a quote next to it."
~Abraham Lincoln

Guide to the Polls Section: http://www.debate.org...