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My Favorite Books In Order

bballcrook21
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12/24/2015 1:12:35 AM
Posted: 11 months ago
As a preface, each book is in order of importance to my principles, not how much I enjoyed them. Most of the time, each book that is most attuned to my principles, will be the book that I enjoy most.

Also, most of these books are Libertarian oriented, and are either about history, philosophy, or economics.

1. The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith

I recently finished this book for the second time, but using a different copy of it. Quite an interesting read; delves into moral philosophy and is mostly an analysis of private ownership and the means of distribution. It's a long read, about 500 pages (for this version) but it is well worth it.

2. Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman

I would say this novel, regardless of its short length, is one of the best that Friedman has ever written. This book is broken down into 13 parts in order: The relation between economic freedom and political freedom (I find this to be one of the best parts), the role of government in a free society, the control of money, international financial and trade arrangements, fiscal policy, the role of government in education, capitalism and discrimination, monopoly and the social responsibility of business and labor, occupational licensure, the distribution of income, social welfare measures, alleviation of poverty, and the conclusion.

3. A Monetary History of the United States - Milton Friedman

This novel is arguably one of the most Macroeconomics works, other than the General Theory by Keynes. The novel was written in the 60s, so any contextual evidence is historical now, but the principles still hold true. I would recommend reading this.

4. Crony Capitalism in the United States - Hunter Lewis

This is a book that delves into the first half of Obama's presidency. In about 350 pages, it details a great amount about political favors. The preface goes "When private interests need political favor, they know whom to call. When politicians need money, they also know whom to call. The people involved try to keep most of it concealed behind closed doors"

5. World History - Philip Parker

This is more a mainstream book. It details, in about 400 pages, all important history from the Ancient era to the Modern Era. It doesn't delve too deeply, but it provides useful information on all the eras.

6. King Solomon's Mines by H. Rider Haggard

I would say this is one of my favorite semi-fictional books. It's quite interesting, and it's not anti-climactic.

7. The Road to Serfdom - Friedrich Hayek

This is one of my favorite books for a reason. It delves into the mistakes of central planning, and philosophizes the difference between Socialist equality and equality through Liberty.
If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there'd be a shortage of sand. - Friedman

Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself. -Friedman

Nothing is so permanent as a temporary government program. - Friedman

Society will never be free until the last Democrat is strangled with the entrails of the last Communist.
tajshar2k
Posts: 2,385
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12/26/2015 2:16:19 AM
Posted: 11 months ago
At 12/24/2015 1:12:35 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
As a preface, each book is in order of importance to my principles, not how much I enjoyed them. Most of the time, each book that is most attuned to my principles, will be the book that I enjoy most.

Also, most of these books are Libertarian oriented, and are either about history, philosophy, or economics.

1. The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith

I recently finished this book for the second time, but using a different copy of it. Quite an interesting read; delves into moral philosophy and is mostly an analysis of private ownership and the means of distribution. It's a long read, about 500 pages (for this version) but it is well worth it.

2. Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman

I would say this novel, regardless of its short length, is one of the best that Friedman has ever written. This book is broken down into 13 parts in order: The relation between economic freedom and political freedom (I find this to be one of the best parts), the role of government in a free society, the control of money, international financial and trade arrangements, fiscal policy, the role of government in education, capitalism and discrimination, monopoly and the social responsibility of business and labor, occupational licensure, the distribution of income, social welfare measures, alleviation of poverty, and the conclusion.

3. A Monetary History of the United States - Milton Friedman

This novel is arguably one of the most Macroeconomics works, other than the General Theory by Keynes. The novel was written in the 60s, so any contextual evidence is historical now, but the principles still hold true. I would recommend reading this.

4. Crony Capitalism in the United States - Hunter Lewis

This is a book that delves into the first half of Obama's presidency. In about 350 pages, it details a great amount about political favors. The preface goes "When private interests need political favor, they know whom to call. When politicians need money, they also know whom to call. The people involved try to keep most of it concealed behind closed doors"

5. World History - Philip Parker

This is more a mainstream book. It details, in about 400 pages, all important history from the Ancient era to the Modern Era. It doesn't delve too deeply, but it provides useful information on all the eras.

6. King Solomon's Mines by H. Rider Haggard

I would say this is one of my favorite semi-fictional books. It's quite interesting, and it's not anti-climactic.

7. The Road to Serfdom - Friedrich Hayek

This is one of my favorite books for a reason. It delves into the mistakes of central planning, and philosophizes the difference between Socialist equality and equality through Liberty.

Should I buy The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, or Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman? Which was more interesting?
"In Guns We Trust" Tajshar2k
bballcrook21
Posts: 4,468
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12/26/2015 2:18:24 AM
Posted: 11 months ago
At 12/26/2015 2:16:19 AM, tajshar2k wrote:
At 12/24/2015 1:12:35 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
As a preface, each book is in order of importance to my principles, not how much I enjoyed them. Most of the time, each book that is most attuned to my principles, will be the book that I enjoy most.

Also, most of these books are Libertarian oriented, and are either about history, philosophy, or economics.

1. The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith

I recently finished this book for the second time, but using a different copy of it. Quite an interesting read; delves into moral philosophy and is mostly an analysis of private ownership and the means of distribution. It's a long read, about 500 pages (for this version) but it is well worth it.

2. Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman

I would say this novel, regardless of its short length, is one of the best that Friedman has ever written. This book is broken down into 13 parts in order: The relation between economic freedom and political freedom (I find this to be one of the best parts), the role of government in a free society, the control of money, international financial and trade arrangements, fiscal policy, the role of government in education, capitalism and discrimination, monopoly and the social responsibility of business and labor, occupational licensure, the distribution of income, social welfare measures, alleviation of poverty, and the conclusion.

3. A Monetary History of the United States - Milton Friedman

This novel is arguably one of the most Macroeconomics works, other than the General Theory by Keynes. The novel was written in the 60s, so any contextual evidence is historical now, but the principles still hold true. I would recommend reading this.

4. Crony Capitalism in the United States - Hunter Lewis

This is a book that delves into the first half of Obama's presidency. In about 350 pages, it details a great amount about political favors. The preface goes "When private interests need political favor, they know whom to call. When politicians need money, they also know whom to call. The people involved try to keep most of it concealed behind closed doors"

5. World History - Philip Parker

This is more a mainstream book. It details, in about 400 pages, all important history from the Ancient era to the Modern Era. It doesn't delve too deeply, but it provides useful information on all the eras.

6. King Solomon's Mines by H. Rider Haggard

I would say this is one of my favorite semi-fictional books. It's quite interesting, and it's not anti-climactic.

7. The Road to Serfdom - Friedrich Hayek

This is one of my favorite books for a reason. It delves into the mistakes of central planning, and philosophizes the difference between Socialist equality and equality through Liberty.

Should I buy The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, or Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman? Which was more interesting?

The Wealth of Nations is the founder of modern economics. It is a 500 page book, and it's not a very easy read, since it was written in the 18th century.

Capitalism and Freedom is an easier read, more modern, and a pretty good book overall.

I would get Capitalism and Freedom first, since you could probably finish it over break. Get Wealth of Nations for the summer.
If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there'd be a shortage of sand. - Friedman

Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself. -Friedman

Nothing is so permanent as a temporary government program. - Friedman

Society will never be free until the last Democrat is strangled with the entrails of the last Communist.
tajshar2k
Posts: 2,385
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12/26/2015 2:21:13 AM
Posted: 11 months ago
At 12/26/2015 2:18:24 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 12/26/2015 2:16:19 AM, tajshar2k wrote:
At 12/24/2015 1:12:35 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
As a preface, each book is in order of importance to my principles, not how much I enjoyed them. Most of the time, each book that is most attuned to my principles, will be the book that I enjoy most.

Also, most of these books are Libertarian oriented, and are either about history, philosophy, or economics.

1. The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith

I recently finished this book for the second time, but using a different copy of it. Quite an interesting read; delves into moral philosophy and is mostly an analysis of private ownership and the means of distribution. It's a long read, about 500 pages (for this version) but it is well worth it.

2. Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman

I would say this novel, regardless of its short length, is one of the best that Friedman has ever written. This book is broken down into 13 parts in order: The relation between economic freedom and political freedom (I find this to be one of the best parts), the role of government in a free society, the control of money, international financial and trade arrangements, fiscal policy, the role of government in education, capitalism and discrimination, monopoly and the social responsibility of business and labor, occupational licensure, the distribution of income, social welfare measures, alleviation of poverty, and the conclusion.

3. A Monetary History of the United States - Milton Friedman

This novel is arguably one of the most Macroeconomics works, other than the General Theory by Keynes. The novel was written in the 60s, so any contextual evidence is historical now, but the principles still hold true. I would recommend reading this.

4. Crony Capitalism in the United States - Hunter Lewis

This is a book that delves into the first half of Obama's presidency. In about 350 pages, it details a great amount about political favors. The preface goes "When private interests need political favor, they know whom to call. When politicians need money, they also know whom to call. The people involved try to keep most of it concealed behind closed doors"

5. World History - Philip Parker

This is more a mainstream book. It details, in about 400 pages, all important history from the Ancient era to the Modern Era. It doesn't delve too deeply, but it provides useful information on all the eras.

6. King Solomon's Mines by H. Rider Haggard

I would say this is one of my favorite semi-fictional books. It's quite interesting, and it's not anti-climactic.

7. The Road to Serfdom - Friedrich Hayek

This is one of my favorite books for a reason. It delves into the mistakes of central planning, and philosophizes the difference between Socialist equality and equality through Liberty.

Should I buy The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, or Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman? Which was more interesting?

The Wealth of Nations is the founder of modern economics. It is a 500 page book, and it's not a very easy read, since it was written in the 18th century.

Capitalism and Freedom is an easier read, more modern, and a pretty good book overall.

I would get Capitalism and Freedom first, since you could probably finish it over break. Get Wealth of Nations for the summer.

Going to order it on Amazon right now :D
"In Guns We Trust" Tajshar2k
UtherPenguin
Posts: 3,685
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12/26/2015 2:23:27 AM
Posted: 11 months ago
At 12/26/2015 2:21:13 AM, tajshar2k wrote:
At 12/26/2015 2:18:24 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 12/26/2015 2:16:19 AM, tajshar2k wrote:
At 12/24/2015 1:12:35 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
As a preface, each book is in order of importance to my principles, not how much I enjoyed them. Most of the time, each book that is most attuned to my principles, will be the book that I enjoy most.

Also, most of these books are Libertarian oriented, and are either about history, philosophy, or economics.

1. The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith

I recently finished this book for the second time, but using a different copy of it. Quite an interesting read; delves into moral philosophy and is mostly an analysis of private ownership and the means of distribution. It's a long read, about 500 pages (for this version) but it is well worth it.

2. Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman

I would say this novel, regardless of its short length, is one of the best that Friedman has ever written. This book is broken down into 13 parts in order: The relation between economic freedom and political freedom (I find this to be one of the best parts), the role of government in a free society, the control of money, international financial and trade arrangements, fiscal policy, the role of government in education, capitalism and discrimination, monopoly and the social responsibility of business and labor, occupational licensure, the distribution of income, social welfare measures, alleviation of poverty, and the conclusion.

3. A Monetary History of the United States - Milton Friedman

This novel is arguably one of the most Macroeconomics works, other than the General Theory by Keynes. The novel was written in the 60s, so any contextual evidence is historical now, but the principles still hold true. I would recommend reading this.

4. Crony Capitalism in the United States - Hunter Lewis

This is a book that delves into the first half of Obama's presidency. In about 350 pages, it details a great amount about political favors. The preface goes "When private interests need political favor, they know whom to call. When politicians need money, they also know whom to call. The people involved try to keep most of it concealed behind closed doors"

5. World History - Philip Parker

This is more a mainstream book. It details, in about 400 pages, all important history from the Ancient era to the Modern Era. It doesn't delve too deeply, but it provides useful information on all the eras.

6. King Solomon's Mines by H. Rider Haggard

I would say this is one of my favorite semi-fictional books. It's quite interesting, and it's not anti-climactic.

7. The Road to Serfdom - Friedrich Hayek

This is one of my favorite books for a reason. It delves into the mistakes of central planning, and philosophizes the difference between Socialist equality and equality through Liberty.

Should I buy The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, or Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman? Which was more interesting?

The Wealth of Nations is the founder of modern economics. It is a 500 page book, and it's not a very easy read, since it was written in the 18th century.

Capitalism and Freedom is an easier read, more modern, and a pretty good book overall.

I would get Capitalism and Freedom first, since you could probably finish it over break. Get Wealth of Nations for the summer.

Going to order it on Amazon right now :D

Don't forget these books

http://www.goodreads.com...

http://www.goodreads.com...
"Praise Allah."
~YYW
tajshar2k
Posts: 2,385
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12/26/2015 2:24:51 AM
Posted: 11 months ago
At 12/26/2015 2:23:27 AM, UtherPenguin wrote:
At 12/26/2015 2:21:13 AM, tajshar2k wrote:
At 12/26/2015 2:18:24 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 12/26/2015 2:16:19 AM, tajshar2k wrote:
At 12/24/2015 1:12:35 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
As a preface, each book is in order of importance to my principles, not how much I enjoyed them. Most of the time, each book that is most attuned to my principles, will be the book that I enjoy most.

Also, most of these books are Libertarian oriented, and are either about history, philosophy, or economics.

1. The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith

I recently finished this book for the second time, but using a different copy of it. Quite an interesting read; delves into moral philosophy and is mostly an analysis of private ownership and the means of distribution. It's a long read, about 500 pages (for this version) but it is well worth it.

2. Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman

I would say this novel, regardless of its short length, is one of the best that Friedman has ever written. This book is broken down into 13 parts in order: The relation between economic freedom and political freedom (I find this to be one of the best parts), the role of government in a free society, the control of money, international financial and trade arrangements, fiscal policy, the role of government in education, capitalism and discrimination, monopoly and the social responsibility of business and labor, occupational licensure, the distribution of income, social welfare measures, alleviation of poverty, and the conclusion.

3. A Monetary History of the United States - Milton Friedman

This novel is arguably one of the most Macroeconomics works, other than the General Theory by Keynes. The novel was written in the 60s, so any contextual evidence is historical now, but the principles still hold true. I would recommend reading this.

4. Crony Capitalism in the United States - Hunter Lewis

This is a book that delves into the first half of Obama's presidency. In about 350 pages, it details a great amount about political favors. The preface goes "When private interests need political favor, they know whom to call. When politicians need money, they also know whom to call. The people involved try to keep most of it concealed behind closed doors"

5. World History - Philip Parker

This is more a mainstream book. It details, in about 400 pages, all important history from the Ancient era to the Modern Era. It doesn't delve too deeply, but it provides useful information on all the eras.

6. King Solomon's Mines by H. Rider Haggard

I would say this is one of my favorite semi-fictional books. It's quite interesting, and it's not anti-climactic.

7. The Road to Serfdom - Friedrich Hayek

This is one of my favorite books for a reason. It delves into the mistakes of central planning, and philosophizes the difference between Socialist equality and equality through Liberty.

Should I buy The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, or Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman? Which was more interesting?

The Wealth of Nations is the founder of modern economics. It is a 500 page book, and it's not a very easy read, since it was written in the 18th century.

Capitalism and Freedom is an easier read, more modern, and a pretty good book overall.

I would get Capitalism and Freedom first, since you could probably finish it over break. Get Wealth of Nations for the summer.

Going to order it on Amazon right now :D

Don't forget these books

http://www.goodreads.com...

http://www.goodreads.com...

You good bro?
"In Guns We Trust" Tajshar2k
tajshar2k
Posts: 2,385
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12/26/2015 2:25:51 AM
Posted: 11 months ago
At 12/24/2015 1:12:35 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
As a preface, each book is in order of importance to my principles, not how much I enjoyed them. Most of the time, each book that is most attuned to my principles, will be the book that I enjoy most.

Also, most of these books are Libertarian oriented, and are either about history, philosophy, or economics.

1. The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith

I recently finished this book for the second time, but using a different copy of it. Quite an interesting read; delves into moral philosophy and is mostly an analysis of private ownership and the means of distribution. It's a long read, about 500 pages (for this version) but it is well worth it.

2. Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman

I would say this novel, regardless of its short length, is one of the best that Friedman has ever written. This book is broken down into 13 parts in order: The relation between economic freedom and political freedom (I find this to be one of the best parts), the role of government in a free society, the control of money, international financial and trade arrangements, fiscal policy, the role of government in education, capitalism and discrimination, monopoly and the social responsibility of business and labor, occupational licensure, the distribution of income, social welfare measures, alleviation of poverty, and the conclusion.

3. A Monetary History of the United States - Milton Friedman

This novel is arguably one of the most Macroeconomics works, other than the General Theory by Keynes. The novel was written in the 60s, so any contextual evidence is historical now, but the principles still hold true. I would recommend reading this.

4. Crony Capitalism in the United States - Hunter Lewis

This is a book that delves into the first half of Obama's presidency. In about 350 pages, it details a great amount about political favors. The preface goes "When private interests need political favor, they know whom to call. When politicians need money, they also know whom to call. The people involved try to keep most of it concealed behind closed doors"

5. World History - Philip Parker

This is more a mainstream book. It details, in about 400 pages, all important history from the Ancient era to the Modern Era. It doesn't delve too deeply, but it provides useful information on all the eras.

6. King Solomon's Mines by H. Rider Haggard

I would say this is one of my favorite semi-fictional books. It's quite interesting, and it's not anti-climactic.

7. The Road to Serfdom - Friedrich Hayek

This is one of my favorite books for a reason. It delves into the mistakes of central planning, and philosophizes the difference between Socialist equality and equality through Liberty.

The price difference between the paperback and hardcover is crazy. Which one do you have? I personally prefer buying hardcover books, because they last longer.
"In Guns We Trust" Tajshar2k
UtherPenguin
Posts: 3,685
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12/26/2015 2:26:23 AM
Posted: 11 months ago
At 12/26/2015 2:24:51 AM, tajshar2k wrote:
At 12/26/2015 2:23:27 AM, UtherPenguin wrote:
At 12/26/2015 2:21:13 AM, tajshar2k wrote:
At 12/26/2015 2:18:24 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 12/26/2015 2:16:19 AM, tajshar2k wrote:
At 12/24/2015 1:12:35 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
As a preface, each book is in order of importance to my principles, not how much I enjoyed them. Most of the time, each book that is most attuned to my principles, will be the book that I enjoy most.

Also, most of these books are Libertarian oriented, and are either about history, philosophy, or economics.

1. The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith

I recently finished this book for the second time, but using a different copy of it. Quite an interesting read; delves into moral philosophy and is mostly an analysis of private ownership and the means of distribution. It's a long read, about 500 pages (for this version) but it is well worth it.

2. Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman

I would say this novel, regardless of its short length, is one of the best that Friedman has ever written. This book is broken down into 13 parts in order: The relation between economic freedom and political freedom (I find this to be one of the best parts), the role of government in a free society, the control of money, international financial and trade arrangements, fiscal policy, the role of government in education, capitalism and discrimination, monopoly and the social responsibility of business and labor, occupational licensure, the distribution of income, social welfare measures, alleviation of poverty, and the conclusion.

3. A Monetary History of the United States - Milton Friedman

This novel is arguably one of the most Macroeconomics works, other than the General Theory by Keynes. The novel was written in the 60s, so any contextual evidence is historical now, but the principles still hold true. I would recommend reading this.

4. Crony Capitalism in the United States - Hunter Lewis

This is a book that delves into the first half of Obama's presidency. In about 350 pages, it details a great amount about political favors. The preface goes "When private interests need political favor, they know whom to call. When politicians need money, they also know whom to call. The people involved try to keep most of it concealed behind closed doors"

5. World History - Philip Parker

This is more a mainstream book. It details, in about 400 pages, all important history from the Ancient era to the Modern Era. It doesn't delve too deeply, but it provides useful information on all the eras.

6. King Solomon's Mines by H. Rider Haggard

I would say this is one of my favorite semi-fictional books. It's quite interesting, and it's not anti-climactic.

7. The Road to Serfdom - Friedrich Hayek

This is one of my favorite books for a reason. It delves into the mistakes of central planning, and philosophizes the difference between Socialist equality and equality through Liberty.

Should I buy The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, or Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman? Which was more interesting?

The Wealth of Nations is the founder of modern economics. It is a 500 page book, and it's not a very easy read, since it was written in the 18th century.

Capitalism and Freedom is an easier read, more modern, and a pretty good book overall.

I would get Capitalism and Freedom first, since you could probably finish it over break. Get Wealth of Nations for the summer.

Going to order it on Amazon right now :D

Don't forget these books

http://www.goodreads.com...

http://www.goodreads.com...

You good bro?

Yes, I would also reccomend this http://www.goodreads.com...
"Praise Allah."
~YYW
PetersSmith
Posts: 5,860
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12/26/2015 2:28:05 AM
Posted: 11 months ago
At 12/26/2015 2:16:19 AM, tajshar2k wrote:
At 12/24/2015 1:12:35 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
As a preface, each book is in order of importance to my principles, not how much I enjoyed them. Most of the time, each book that is most attuned to my principles, will be the book that I enjoy most.

Also, most of these books are Libertarian oriented, and are either about history, philosophy, or economics.

1. The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith

I recently finished this book for the second time, but using a different copy of it. Quite an interesting read; delves into moral philosophy and is mostly an analysis of private ownership and the means of distribution. It's a long read, about 500 pages (for this version) but it is well worth it.

2. Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman

I would say this novel, regardless of its short length, is one of the best that Friedman has ever written. This book is broken down into 13 parts in order: The relation between economic freedom and political freedom (I find this to be one of the best parts), the role of government in a free society, the control of money, international financial and trade arrangements, fiscal policy, the role of government in education, capitalism and discrimination, monopoly and the social responsibility of business and labor, occupational licensure, the distribution of income, social welfare measures, alleviation of poverty, and the conclusion.

3. A Monetary History of the United States - Milton Friedman

This novel is arguably one of the most Macroeconomics works, other than the General Theory by Keynes. The novel was written in the 60s, so any contextual evidence is historical now, but the principles still hold true. I would recommend reading this.

4. Crony Capitalism in the United States - Hunter Lewis

This is a book that delves into the first half of Obama's presidency. In about 350 pages, it details a great amount about political favors. The preface goes "When private interests need political favor, they know whom to call. When politicians need money, they also know whom to call. The people involved try to keep most of it concealed behind closed doors"

5. World History - Philip Parker

This is more a mainstream book. It details, in about 400 pages, all important history from the Ancient era to the Modern Era. It doesn't delve too deeply, but it provides useful information on all the eras.

6. King Solomon's Mines by H. Rider Haggard

I would say this is one of my favorite semi-fictional books. It's quite interesting, and it's not anti-climactic.

7. The Road to Serfdom - Friedrich Hayek

This is one of my favorite books for a reason. It delves into the mistakes of central planning, and philosophizes the difference between Socialist equality and equality through Liberty.

Should I buy The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, or Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman? Which was more interesting?

Here, saved you the money: https://www.marxists.org...
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bballcrook21
Posts: 4,468
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12/26/2015 2:28:17 AM
Posted: 11 months ago
At 12/26/2015 2:26:23 AM, UtherPenguin wrote:
At 12/26/2015 2:24:51 AM, tajshar2k wrote:
At 12/26/2015 2:23:27 AM, UtherPenguin wrote:
At 12/26/2015 2:21:13 AM, tajshar2k wrote:
At 12/26/2015 2:18:24 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 12/26/2015 2:16:19 AM, tajshar2k wrote:
At 12/24/2015 1:12:35 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
As a preface, each book is in order of importance to my principles, not how much I enjoyed them. Most of the time, each book that is most attuned to my principles, will be the book that I enjoy most.

Also, most of these books are Libertarian oriented, and are either about history, philosophy, or economics.

1. The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith

I recently finished this book for the second time, but using a different copy of it. Quite an interesting read; delves into moral philosophy and is mostly an analysis of private ownership and the means of distribution. It's a long read, about 500 pages (for this version) but it is well worth it.

2. Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman

I would say this novel, regardless of its short length, is one of the best that Friedman has ever written. This book is broken down into 13 parts in order: The relation between economic freedom and political freedom (I find this to be one of the best parts), the role of government in a free society, the control of money, international financial and trade arrangements, fiscal policy, the role of government in education, capitalism and discrimination, monopoly and the social responsibility of business and labor, occupational licensure, the distribution of income, social welfare measures, alleviation of poverty, and the conclusion.

3. A Monetary History of the United States - Milton Friedman

This novel is arguably one of the most Macroeconomics works, other than the General Theory by Keynes. The novel was written in the 60s, so any contextual evidence is historical now, but the principles still hold true. I would recommend reading this.

4. Crony Capitalism in the United States - Hunter Lewis

This is a book that delves into the first half of Obama's presidency. In about 350 pages, it details a great amount about political favors. The preface goes "When private interests need political favor, they know whom to call. When politicians need money, they also know whom to call. The people involved try to keep most of it concealed behind closed doors"

5. World History - Philip Parker

This is more a mainstream book. It details, in about 400 pages, all important history from the Ancient era to the Modern Era. It doesn't delve too deeply, but it provides useful information on all the eras.

6. King Solomon's Mines by H. Rider Haggard

I would say this is one of my favorite semi-fictional books. It's quite interesting, and it's not anti-climactic.

7. The Road to Serfdom - Friedrich Hayek

This is one of my favorite books for a reason. It delves into the mistakes of central planning, and philosophizes the difference between Socialist equality and equality through Liberty.

Should I buy The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, or Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman? Which was more interesting?

The Wealth of Nations is the founder of modern economics. It is a 500 page book, and it's not a very easy read, since it was written in the 18th century.

Capitalism and Freedom is an easier read, more modern, and a pretty good book overall.

I would get Capitalism and Freedom first, since you could probably finish it over break. Get Wealth of Nations for the summer.

Going to order it on Amazon right now :D

Don't forget these books

http://www.goodreads.com...

http://www.goodreads.com...

You good bro?

Yes, I would also reccomend this http://www.goodreads.com...

Don't troll my posts.
If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there'd be a shortage of sand. - Friedman

Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself. -Friedman

Nothing is so permanent as a temporary government program. - Friedman

Society will never be free until the last Democrat is strangled with the entrails of the last Communist.
bballcrook21
Posts: 4,468
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12/26/2015 2:29:38 AM
Posted: 11 months ago
At 12/26/2015 2:25:51 AM, tajshar2k wrote:
At 12/24/2015 1:12:35 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:

Actually, Das Kapital wouldn't be too bad. It's good to get all sides.

Communist Manifesto is pure stupidity, and same with Mao Zedong's biography, or anything of the sort. Mao didn't do anything worthy of praise, he murdered millions and created a terrible regime.
If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there'd be a shortage of sand. - Friedman

Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself. -Friedman

Nothing is so permanent as a temporary government program. - Friedman

Society will never be free until the last Democrat is strangled with the entrails of the last Communist.
tajshar2k
Posts: 2,385
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12/26/2015 2:29:49 AM
Posted: 11 months ago
At 12/26/2015 2:28:05 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 12/26/2015 2:16:19 AM, tajshar2k wrote:
At 12/24/2015 1:12:35 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
As a preface, each book is in order of importance to my principles, not how much I enjoyed them. Most of the time, each book that is most attuned to my principles, will be the book that I enjoy most.

Also, most of these books are Libertarian oriented, and are either about history, philosophy, or economics.

1. The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith

I recently finished this book for the second time, but using a different copy of it. Quite an interesting read; delves into moral philosophy and is mostly an analysis of private ownership and the means of distribution. It's a long read, about 500 pages (for this version) but it is well worth it.

2. Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman

I would say this novel, regardless of its short length, is one of the best that Friedman has ever written. This book is broken down into 13 parts in order: The relation between economic freedom and political freedom (I find this to be one of the best parts), the role of government in a free society, the control of money, international financial and trade arrangements, fiscal policy, the role of government in education, capitalism and discrimination, monopoly and the social responsibility of business and labor, occupational licensure, the distribution of income, social welfare measures, alleviation of poverty, and the conclusion.

3. A Monetary History of the United States - Milton Friedman

This novel is arguably one of the most Macroeconomics works, other than the General Theory by Keynes. The novel was written in the 60s, so any contextual evidence is historical now, but the principles still hold true. I would recommend reading this.

4. Crony Capitalism in the United States - Hunter Lewis

This is a book that delves into the first half of Obama's presidency. In about 350 pages, it details a great amount about political favors. The preface goes "When private interests need political favor, they know whom to call. When politicians need money, they also know whom to call. The people involved try to keep most of it concealed behind closed doors"

5. World History - Philip Parker

This is more a mainstream book. It details, in about 400 pages, all important history from the Ancient era to the Modern Era. It doesn't delve too deeply, but it provides useful information on all the eras.

6. King Solomon's Mines by H. Rider Haggard

I would say this is one of my favorite semi-fictional books. It's quite interesting, and it's not anti-climactic.

7. The Road to Serfdom - Friedrich Hayek

This is one of my favorite books for a reason. It delves into the mistakes of central planning, and philosophizes the difference between Socialist equality and equality through Liberty.

Should I buy The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, or Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman? Which was more interesting?

Here, saved you the money: https://www.marxists.org...

Why thank you :D
"In Guns We Trust" Tajshar2k
PetersSmith
Posts: 5,860
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12/26/2015 2:30:28 AM
Posted: 11 months ago
At 12/26/2015 2:29:49 AM, tajshar2k wrote:
At 12/26/2015 2:28:05 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 12/26/2015 2:16:19 AM, tajshar2k wrote:
At 12/24/2015 1:12:35 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
As a preface, each book is in order of importance to my principles, not how much I enjoyed them. Most of the time, each book that is most attuned to my principles, will be the book that I enjoy most.

Also, most of these books are Libertarian oriented, and are either about history, philosophy, or economics.

1. The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith

I recently finished this book for the second time, but using a different copy of it. Quite an interesting read; delves into moral philosophy and is mostly an analysis of private ownership and the means of distribution. It's a long read, about 500 pages (for this version) but it is well worth it.

2. Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman

I would say this novel, regardless of its short length, is one of the best that Friedman has ever written. This book is broken down into 13 parts in order: The relation between economic freedom and political freedom (I find this to be one of the best parts), the role of government in a free society, the control of money, international financial and trade arrangements, fiscal policy, the role of government in education, capitalism and discrimination, monopoly and the social responsibility of business and labor, occupational licensure, the distribution of income, social welfare measures, alleviation of poverty, and the conclusion.

3. A Monetary History of the United States - Milton Friedman

This novel is arguably one of the most Macroeconomics works, other than the General Theory by Keynes. The novel was written in the 60s, so any contextual evidence is historical now, but the principles still hold true. I would recommend reading this.

4. Crony Capitalism in the United States - Hunter Lewis

This is a book that delves into the first half of Obama's presidency. In about 350 pages, it details a great amount about political favors. The preface goes "When private interests need political favor, they know whom to call. When politicians need money, they also know whom to call. The people involved try to keep most of it concealed behind closed doors"

5. World History - Philip Parker

This is more a mainstream book. It details, in about 400 pages, all important history from the Ancient era to the Modern Era. It doesn't delve too deeply, but it provides useful information on all the eras.

6. King Solomon's Mines by H. Rider Haggard

I would say this is one of my favorite semi-fictional books. It's quite interesting, and it's not anti-climactic.

7. The Road to Serfdom - Friedrich Hayek

This is one of my favorite books for a reason. It delves into the mistakes of central planning, and philosophizes the difference between Socialist equality and equality through Liberty.

Should I buy The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, or Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman? Which was more interesting?

Here, saved you the money: https://www.marxists.org...

Why thank you :D

Happy holidays.
Empress of DDO (also Poll and Forum "Maintenance" Moderator)

"The two most important days in your life is the day you were born, and the day you find out why."
~Mark Twain

"Wow"
-Doge

"Don't believe everything you read on the internet just because there's a picture with a quote next to it."
~Abraham Lincoln

Guide to the Polls Section: http://www.debate.org...
tajshar2k
Posts: 2,385
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12/26/2015 2:30:55 AM
Posted: 11 months ago
At 12/26/2015 2:30:28 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 12/26/2015 2:29:49 AM, tajshar2k wrote:
At 12/26/2015 2:28:05 AM, PetersSmith wrote:
At 12/26/2015 2:16:19 AM, tajshar2k wrote:
At 12/24/2015 1:12:35 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
As a preface, each book is in order of importance to my principles, not how much I enjoyed them. Most of the time, each book that is most attuned to my principles, will be the book that I enjoy most.

Also, most of these books are Libertarian oriented, and are either about history, philosophy, or economics.

1. The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith

I recently finished this book for the second time, but using a different copy of it. Quite an interesting read; delves into moral philosophy and is mostly an analysis of private ownership and the means of distribution. It's a long read, about 500 pages (for this version) but it is well worth it.

2. Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman

I would say this novel, regardless of its short length, is one of the best that Friedman has ever written. This book is broken down into 13 parts in order: The relation between economic freedom and political freedom (I find this to be one of the best parts), the role of government in a free society, the control of money, international financial and trade arrangements, fiscal policy, the role of government in education, capitalism and discrimination, monopoly and the social responsibility of business and labor, occupational licensure, the distribution of income, social welfare measures, alleviation of poverty, and the conclusion.

3. A Monetary History of the United States - Milton Friedman

This novel is arguably one of the most Macroeconomics works, other than the General Theory by Keynes. The novel was written in the 60s, so any contextual evidence is historical now, but the principles still hold true. I would recommend reading this.

4. Crony Capitalism in the United States - Hunter Lewis

This is a book that delves into the first half of Obama's presidency. In about 350 pages, it details a great amount about political favors. The preface goes "When private interests need political favor, they know whom to call. When politicians need money, they also know whom to call. The people involved try to keep most of it concealed behind closed doors"

5. World History - Philip Parker

This is more a mainstream book. It details, in about 400 pages, all important history from the Ancient era to the Modern Era. It doesn't delve too deeply, but it provides useful information on all the eras.

6. King Solomon's Mines by H. Rider Haggard

I would say this is one of my favorite semi-fictional books. It's quite interesting, and it's not anti-climactic.

7. The Road to Serfdom - Friedrich Hayek

This is one of my favorite books for a reason. It delves into the mistakes of central planning, and philosophizes the difference between Socialist equality and equality through Liberty.

Should I buy The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, or Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman? Which was more interesting?

Here, saved you the money: https://www.marxists.org...

Why thank you :D

Happy holidays.

Same to you
"In Guns We Trust" Tajshar2k
a414078
Posts: 11
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12/27/2015 3:41:59 AM
Posted: 11 months ago
At 12/26/2015 2:29:38 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:
At 12/26/2015 2:25:51 AM, tajshar2k wrote:
At 12/24/2015 1:12:35 AM, bballcrook21 wrote:


Actually, Das Kapital wouldn't be too bad. It's good to get all sides.

Communist Manifesto is pure stupidity, and same with Mao Zedong's biography, or anything of the sort. Mao didn't do anything worthy of praise, he murdered millions and created a terrible regime.

Not even his poetry was worthy of praise in terms of literary merit?