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Long Distance Relationships

TUF
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4/16/2016 1:13:59 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
Just out of curiosity, do they work? Have any of you ever had one?
"I've got to go and grab a shirt" ~ Airmax1227
RyuuKyuzo
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4/16/2016 1:27:15 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
They've never worked out for me, but that doesn't mean they don't work. About 40% of LDR fail, but that still means the odds are on your side that it'll work out just fine, depending on a few other factors.
http://www.longdistancerelationshipstatistics.com...
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RyuuKyuzo
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4/16/2016 1:28:46 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
I know I have at least one friend who has only ever dated one girl, it started as a LDR and now they've been living together for years, so it's possible.
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Deb-8-A-Bull
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4/16/2016 1:38:28 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
The best prediction of future behavior is past behavior.
You need to give us some info on this chick.
TUF
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4/16/2016 2:26:22 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/16/2016 1:38:28 PM, Deb-8-A-Bull wrote:
The best prediction of future behavior is past behavior.
You need to give us some info on this chick.

I'm more asking hypothetically
"I've got to go and grab a shirt" ~ Airmax1227
Maikuru
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4/16/2016 2:39:34 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/16/2016 1:13:59 PM, TUF wrote:
Just out of curiosity, do they work? Have any of you ever had one?

They certainly can.
"You assume I wouldn't want to burn this whole place to the ground."
- lamerde

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TUF
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4/16/2016 2:51:20 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/16/2016 1:27:15 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
They've never worked out for me, but that doesn't mean they don't work. About 40% of LDR fail, but that still means the odds are on your side that it'll work out just fine, depending on a few other factors.
http://www.longdistancerelationshipstatistics.com...

Thanks for the link there was some interesting information in there. I didn't see the bit about 40% failing I must have missed it.

I thought this bit was interesting:
One of the myths around long distance relationships is that they are always or more likely to fail than other kinds of relationships.

However, there is actually no evidence to suggest that this is true.

Of course, not all long distance relationships will survive, but they are not any more likely to end in the demise than another kind of relationship.
"I've got to go and grab a shirt" ~ Airmax1227
RyuuKyuzo
Posts: 3,074
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4/16/2016 3:06:03 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/16/2016 2:51:20 PM, TUF wrote:
At 4/16/2016 1:27:15 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
They've never worked out for me, but that doesn't mean they don't work. About 40% of LDR fail, but that still means the odds are on your side that it'll work out just fine, depending on a few other factors.
http://www.longdistancerelationshipstatistics.com...

Thanks for the link there was some interesting information in there. I didn't see the bit about 40% failing I must have missed it.

I thought this bit was interesting:
One of the myths around long distance relationships is that they are always or more likely to fail than other kinds of relationships.

However, there is actually no evidence to suggest that this is true.

Of course, not all long distance relationships will survive, but they are not any more likely to end in the demise than another kind of relationship.


It's about 3/4 down the page. Anyway, I found something a little more specific;

"After putting out a nationwide news release, Fanny V. Jimenez, then a fellow at Humboldt University of Berlin, found 971 participants in long-distance relationships and 278 participants in proximate relationships (PRs). Jimenez found that for LDRs, the average relationship length was 2.9 years (the standard deviation " one way to measure how much variance there is in the data " was 3.2 years). For PRs, the average relationship was more than twice as long, 7.3 years (the standard deviation was larger, too, though, at 7.5 years)."

http://fivethirtyeight.com...

From what I'm reading here, it doesn't look like LDR are any more likely to fail than proximal relationships, at least in the initial stages. If you want it to last long-term though, you'll want to shift your LDR into a PR sometime within the first three years. This seems to make intuitive sense, after all if you still can't manage to live near each other (let alone with each other) after 3 years it probably won't work out just for practical reasons.

Barring that, I don't see any reason why it can't work.
If you're reading this, you're awesome and you should feel awesome.
Deb-8-A-Bull
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4/16/2016 3:15:44 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/16/2016 3:06:03 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 4/16/2016 2:51:20 PM, TUF wrote:
At 4/16/2016 1:27:15 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
They've never worked out for me, but that doesn't mean they don't work. About 40% of LDR fail, but that still means the odds are on your side that it'll work out just fine, depending on a few other factors.
http://www.longdistancerelationshipstatistics.com...

Thanks for the link there was some interesting information in there. I didn't see the bit about 40% failing I must have missed it.

I thought this bit was interesting:
One of the myths around long distance relationships is that they are always or more likely to fail than other kinds of relationships.

However, there is actually no evidence to suggest that this is true.

Of course, not all long distance relationships will survive, but they are not any more likely to end in the demise than another kind of relationship.


It's about 3/4 down the page. Anyway, I found something a little more specific;

"After putting out a nationwide news release, Fanny V. Jimenez, then a fellow at Humboldt University of Berlin, found 971 participants in long-distance relationships and 278 participants in proximate relationships (PRs). Jimenez found that for LDRs, the average relationship length was 2.9 years (the standard deviation " one way to measure how much variance there is in the data " was 3.2 years). For PRs, the average relationship was more than twice as long, 7.3 years (the standard deviation was larger, too, though, at 7.5 years)."

http://fivethirtyeight.com...

From what I'm reading here, it doesn't look like LDR are any more likely to fail than proximal relationships, at least in the initial stages. If you want it to last long-term though, you'll want to shift your LDR into a PR sometime within the first three years. This seems to make intuitive sense, after all if you still can't manage to live near each other (let alone with each other) after 3 years it probably won't work out just for practical reasons.

Barring that, I don't see any reason why it can't work.

The fact that it's easier to lie would have to play a major role in the only 40% fail.
Don't you think ? So 60% are successful because 30% of them lie. Because it's 50% easier to.
RyuuKyuzo
Posts: 3,074
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4/16/2016 3:20:35 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/16/2016 3:15:44 PM, Deb-8-A-Bull wrote:
At 4/16/2016 3:06:03 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 4/16/2016 2:51:20 PM, TUF wrote:
At 4/16/2016 1:27:15 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
They've never worked out for me, but that doesn't mean they don't work. About 40% of LDR fail, but that still means the odds are on your side that it'll work out just fine, depending on a few other factors.
http://www.longdistancerelationshipstatistics.com...

Thanks for the link there was some interesting information in there. I didn't see the bit about 40% failing I must have missed it.

I thought this bit was interesting:
One of the myths around long distance relationships is that they are always or more likely to fail than other kinds of relationships.

However, there is actually no evidence to suggest that this is true.

Of course, not all long distance relationships will survive, but they are not any more likely to end in the demise than another kind of relationship.


It's about 3/4 down the page. Anyway, I found something a little more specific;

"After putting out a nationwide news release, Fanny V. Jimenez, then a fellow at Humboldt University of Berlin, found 971 participants in long-distance relationships and 278 participants in proximate relationships (PRs). Jimenez found that for LDRs, the average relationship length was 2.9 years (the standard deviation " one way to measure how much variance there is in the data " was 3.2 years). For PRs, the average relationship was more than twice as long, 7.3 years (the standard deviation was larger, too, though, at 7.5 years)."

http://fivethirtyeight.com...

From what I'm reading here, it doesn't look like LDR are any more likely to fail than proximal relationships, at least in the initial stages. If you want it to last long-term though, you'll want to shift your LDR into a PR sometime within the first three years. This seems to make intuitive sense, after all if you still can't manage to live near each other (let alone with each other) after 3 years it probably won't work out just for practical reasons.

Barring that, I don't see any reason why it can't work.

The fact that it's easier to lie would have to play a major role in the only 40% fail.
Don't you think ? So 60% are successful because 30% of them lie. Because it's 50% easier to.

I don't know about lying, but I can see how idealization would be a problem. It's easy to mentally frame your partner into someone they really aren't when you're not actually around them frequently. I did this with an ex of mine. Ironically enough, we only lived a few streets away from each other, but we went to different schools and so we didn't see each other much. Once we started going to the same school, things started to fall apart.
If you're reading this, you're awesome and you should feel awesome.
TUF
Posts: 21,309
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4/16/2016 3:25:44 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/16/2016 3:06:03 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 4/16/2016 2:51:20 PM, TUF wrote:
At 4/16/2016 1:27:15 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
They've never worked out for me, but that doesn't mean they don't work. About 40% of LDR fail, but that still means the odds are on your side that it'll work out just fine, depending on a few other factors.
http://www.longdistancerelationshipstatistics.com...

Thanks for the link there was some interesting information in there. I didn't see the bit about 40% failing I must have missed it.

I thought this bit was interesting:
One of the myths around long distance relationships is that they are always or more likely to fail than other kinds of relationships.

However, there is actually no evidence to suggest that this is true.

Of course, not all long distance relationships will survive, but they are not any more likely to end in the demise than another kind of relationship.


It's about 3/4 down the page. Anyway, I found something a little more specific;

"After putting out a nationwide news release, Fanny V. Jimenez, then a fellow at Humboldt University of Berlin, found 971 participants in long-distance relationships and 278 participants in proximate relationships (PRs). Jimenez found that for LDRs, the average relationship length was 2.9 years (the standard deviation " one way to measure how much variance there is in the data " was 3.2 years). For PRs, the average relationship was more than twice as long, 7.3 years (the standard deviation was larger, too, though, at 7.5 years)."

http://fivethirtyeight.com...

From what I'm reading here, it doesn't look like LDR are any more likely to fail than proximal relationships, at least in the initial stages. If you want it to last long-term though, you'll want to shift your LDR into a PR sometime within the first three years. This seems to make intuitive sense, after all if you still can't manage to live near each other (let alone with each other) after 3 years it probably won't work out just for practical reasons.

Barring that, I don't see any reason why it can't work.

Thanks for the info, it makes sense to me. LDR's need to shift to PR's to effectively work. I was just curious. It seems kind of a wild prospect to pursue a relationship for more than half a year to a year without ever meeting the person. I have heard of people do the long distance thing just had never wanted to do it myself before. Just wanted to see if they were as drastically infamous for not working as rumor tells. From the evidence I am getting, it seems they are not though you can't do it long term.
"I've got to go and grab a shirt" ~ Airmax1227
Deb-8-A-Bull
Posts: 2,181
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4/16/2016 3:27:41 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/16/2016 3:20:35 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 4/16/2016 3:15:44 PM, Deb-8-A-Bull wrote:
At 4/16/2016 3:06:03 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 4/16/2016 2:51:20 PM, TUF wrote:
At 4/16/2016 1:27:15 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
They've never worked out for me, but that doesn't mean they don't work. About 40% of LDR fail, but that still means the odds are on your side that it'll work out just fine, depending on a few other factors.
http://www.longdistancerelationshipstatistics.com...

Thanks for the link there was some interesting information in there. I didn't see the bit about 40% failing I must have missed it.

I thought this bit was interesting:
One of the myths around long distance relationships is that they are always or more likely to fail than other kinds of relationships.

However, there is actually no evidence to suggest that this is true.

Of course, not all long distance relationships will survive, but they are not any more likely to end in the demise than another kind of relationship.


It's about 3/4 down the page. Anyway, I found something a little more specific;

"After putting out a nationwide news release, Fanny V. Jimenez, then a fellow at Humboldt University of Berlin, found 971 participants in long-distance relationships and 278 participants in proximate relationships (PRs). Jimenez found that for LDRs, the average relationship length was 2.9 years (the standard deviation " one way to measure how much variance there is in the data " was 3.2 years). For PRs, the average relationship was more than twice as long, 7.3 years (the standard deviation was larger, too, though, at 7.5 years)."

http://fivethirtyeight.com...

From what I'm reading here, it doesn't look like LDR are any more likely to fail than proximal relationships, at least in the initial stages. If you want it to last long-term though, you'll want to shift your LDR into a PR sometime within the first three years. This seems to make intuitive sense, after all if you still can't manage to live near each other (let alone with each other) after 3 years it probably won't work out just for practical reasons.

Barring that, I don't see any reason why it can't work.

The fact that it's easier to lie would have to play a major role in the only 40% fail.
Don't you think ? So 60% are successful because 30% of them lie. Because it's 50% easier to.

I don't know about lying, but I can see how idealization would be a problem. It's easy to mentally frame your partner into someone they really aren't when you're not actually around them frequently. I did this with an ex of mine. Ironically enough, we only lived a few streets away from each other, but we went to different schools and so we didn't see each other much. Once we started going to the same school, things started to fall apart.

I want to say LOL, but that's a bit rude.
I do hear about the sleeping in separate bed thing works but. Who knows .
The factors thing you said would change heaps but ,
TUF
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4/16/2016 3:28:15 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/16/2016 3:20:35 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 4/16/2016 3:15:44 PM, Deb-8-A-Bull wrote:
At 4/16/2016 3:06:03 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 4/16/2016 2:51:20 PM, TUF wrote:
At 4/16/2016 1:27:15 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
They've never worked out for me, but that doesn't mean they don't work. About 40% of LDR fail, but that still means the odds are on your side that it'll work out just fine, depending on a few other factors.
http://www.longdistancerelationshipstatistics.com...

Thanks for the link there was some interesting information in there. I didn't see the bit about 40% failing I must have missed it.

I thought this bit was interesting:
One of the myths around long distance relationships is that they are always or more likely to fail than other kinds of relationships.

However, there is actually no evidence to suggest that this is true.

Of course, not all long distance relationships will survive, but they are not any more likely to end in the demise than another kind of relationship.


It's about 3/4 down the page. Anyway, I found something a little more specific;

"After putting out a nationwide news release, Fanny V. Jimenez, then a fellow at Humboldt University of Berlin, found 971 participants in long-distance relationships and 278 participants in proximate relationships (PRs). Jimenez found that for LDRs, the average relationship length was 2.9 years (the standard deviation " one way to measure how much variance there is in the data " was 3.2 years). For PRs, the average relationship was more than twice as long, 7.3 years (the standard deviation was larger, too, though, at 7.5 years)."

http://fivethirtyeight.com...

From what I'm reading here, it doesn't look like LDR are any more likely to fail than proximal relationships, at least in the initial stages. If you want it to last long-term though, you'll want to shift your LDR into a PR sometime within the first three years. This seems to make intuitive sense, after all if you still can't manage to live near each other (let alone with each other) after 3 years it probably won't work out just for practical reasons.

Barring that, I don't see any reason why it can't work.

The fact that it's easier to lie would have to play a major role in the only 40% fail.
Don't you think ? So 60% are successful because 30% of them lie. Because it's 50% easier to.

I don't know about lying, but I can see how idealization would be a problem. It's easy to mentally frame your partner into someone they really aren't when you're not actually around them frequently. I did this with an ex of mine. Ironically enough, we only lived a few streets away from each other, but we went to different schools and so we didn't see each other much. Once we started going to the same school, things started to fall apart.

That's another big worry with the LDR thing. I have done that, prepped someone uo to be great just to find out that we had no chemistry later online. Seems scary to waste time and energy into someone without having fully met them.
"I've got to go and grab a shirt" ~ Airmax1227
Maikuru
Posts: 9,112
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4/16/2016 3:43:40 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/16/2016 3:06:03 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 4/16/2016 2:51:20 PM, TUF wrote:
At 4/16/2016 1:27:15 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
They've never worked out for me, but that doesn't mean they don't work. About 40% of LDR fail, but that still means the odds are on your side that it'll work out just fine, depending on a few other factors.
http://www.longdistancerelationshipstatistics.com...

Thanks for the link there was some interesting information in there. I didn't see the bit about 40% failing I must have missed it.

I thought this bit was interesting:
One of the myths around long distance relationships is that they are always or more likely to fail than other kinds of relationships.

However, there is actually no evidence to suggest that this is true.

Of course, not all long distance relationships will survive, but they are not any more likely to end in the demise than another kind of relationship.


It's about 3/4 down the page. Anyway, I found something a little more specific;

"After putting out a nationwide news release, Fanny V. Jimenez, then a fellow at Humboldt University of Berlin, found 971 participants in long-distance relationships and 278 participants in proximate relationships (PRs). Jimenez found that for LDRs, the average relationship length was 2.9 years (the standard deviation " one way to measure how much variance there is in the data " was 3.2 years). For PRs, the average relationship was more than twice as long, 7.3 years (the standard deviation was larger, too, though, at 7.5 years)."

http://fivethirtyeight.com...

From what I'm reading here, it doesn't look like LDR are any more likely to fail than proximal relationships, at least in the initial stages. If you want it to last long-term though, you'll want to shift your LDR into a PR sometime within the first three years. This seems to make intuitive sense, after all if you still can't manage to live near each other (let alone with each other) after 3 years it probably won't work out just for practical reasons.

Barring that, I don't see any reason why it can't work.

My high school girl and I were long distance and we didn't live together until after college, so we were long distance for about 10 years. Obviously not the easiest thing, but it can happen.
"You assume I wouldn't want to burn this whole place to the ground."
- lamerde

https://i.imgflip.com...
Deb-8-A-Bull
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4/16/2016 3:53:34 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
In a male / female
Im thinking it might be harder on the female in a LDR.
I mean, I here that a few men think with their c#@KS. Could you say most men there.

On a totally different subject
Let's now talk about the great range of tracking devices on the market these days.
RyuuKyuzo
Posts: 3,074
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4/16/2016 4:08:14 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/16/2016 3:43:40 PM, Maikuru wrote:
At 4/16/2016 3:06:03 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 4/16/2016 2:51:20 PM, TUF wrote:
At 4/16/2016 1:27:15 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
They've never worked out for me, but that doesn't mean they don't work. About 40% of LDR fail, but that still means the odds are on your side that it'll work out just fine, depending on a few other factors.
http://www.longdistancerelationshipstatistics.com...

Thanks for the link there was some interesting information in there. I didn't see the bit about 40% failing I must have missed it.

I thought this bit was interesting:
One of the myths around long distance relationships is that they are always or more likely to fail than other kinds of relationships.

However, there is actually no evidence to suggest that this is true.

Of course, not all long distance relationships will survive, but they are not any more likely to end in the demise than another kind of relationship.


It's about 3/4 down the page. Anyway, I found something a little more specific;

"After putting out a nationwide news release, Fanny V. Jimenez, then a fellow at Humboldt University of Berlin, found 971 participants in long-distance relationships and 278 participants in proximate relationships (PRs). Jimenez found that for LDRs, the average relationship length was 2.9 years (the standard deviation " one way to measure how much variance there is in the data " was 3.2 years). For PRs, the average relationship was more than twice as long, 7.3 years (the standard deviation was larger, too, though, at 7.5 years)."

http://fivethirtyeight.com...

From what I'm reading here, it doesn't look like LDR are any more likely to fail than proximal relationships, at least in the initial stages. If you want it to last long-term though, you'll want to shift your LDR into a PR sometime within the first three years. This seems to make intuitive sense, after all if you still can't manage to live near each other (let alone with each other) after 3 years it probably won't work out just for practical reasons.

Barring that, I don't see any reason why it can't work.

My high school girl and I were long distance and we didn't live together until after college, so we were long distance for about 10 years. Obviously not the easiest thing, but it can happen.

True, but I'm not so sure the idea of investing 10 years into a LDR that didn't end up working out is a comforting thought. Tbh, one of the good things about LDR likely not exceeding 3 years is that, if it's going to fail at all, at the very least it will fail sooner than a PR would have, so you save a few years.

If two people are meant to be together, then there's not such a worry about it failing in the first place, but if they're not, it's better to find out sooner rather than later.
If you're reading this, you're awesome and you should feel awesome.
Rosalie
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4/16/2016 4:26:01 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/16/2016 1:13:59 PM, TUF wrote:
Just out of curiosity, do they work? Have any of you ever had one?

I don't see why they can't. It takes the right person to be able to handle it, and be comitted, it takes trust, and patience. Distance means noting when you really love the person.
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Maikuru
Posts: 9,112
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4/16/2016 5:01:40 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/16/2016 4:08:14 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 4/16/2016 3:43:40 PM, Maikuru wrote:
At 4/16/2016 3:06:03 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 4/16/2016 2:51:20 PM, TUF wrote:
At 4/16/2016 1:27:15 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
They've never worked out for me, but that doesn't mean they don't work. About 40% of LDR fail, but that still means the odds are on your side that it'll work out just fine, depending on a few other factors.
http://www.longdistancerelationshipstatistics.com...

Thanks for the link there was some interesting information in there. I didn't see the bit about 40% failing I must have missed it.

I thought this bit was interesting:
One of the myths around long distance relationships is that they are always or more likely to fail than other kinds of relationships.

However, there is actually no evidence to suggest that this is true.

Of course, not all long distance relationships will survive, but they are not any more likely to end in the demise than another kind of relationship.


It's about 3/4 down the page. Anyway, I found something a little more specific;

"After putting out a nationwide news release, Fanny V. Jimenez, then a fellow at Humboldt University of Berlin, found 971 participants in long-distance relationships and 278 participants in proximate relationships (PRs). Jimenez found that for LDRs, the average relationship length was 2.9 years (the standard deviation " one way to measure how much variance there is in the data " was 3.2 years). For PRs, the average relationship was more than twice as long, 7.3 years (the standard deviation was larger, too, though, at 7.5 years)."

http://fivethirtyeight.com...

From what I'm reading here, it doesn't look like LDR are any more likely to fail than proximal relationships, at least in the initial stages. If you want it to last long-term though, you'll want to shift your LDR into a PR sometime within the first three years. This seems to make intuitive sense, after all if you still can't manage to live near each other (let alone with each other) after 3 years it probably won't work out just for practical reasons.

Barring that, I don't see any reason why it can't work.

My high school girl and I were long distance and we didn't live together until after college, so we were long distance for about 10 years. Obviously not the easiest thing, but it can happen.

True, but I'm not so sure the idea of investing 10 years into a LDR that didn't end up working out is a comforting thought. Tbh, one of the good things about LDR likely not exceeding 3 years is that, if it's going to fail at all, at the very least it will fail sooner than a PR would have, so you save a few years.

If two people are meant to be together, then there's not such a worry about it failing in the first place, but if they're not, it's better to find out sooner rather than later.

It makes sense that most LDR's are shorter. Not only are there challenges, but there is also a greater emphasis on communication. With more opportunities to get to know the individual outside of external distractions, there are more opportunities to find reasons not to be together.

I'm of the mindset that successful LDR's result in...I don't want to say stronger relationships...maybe expedited ones, in terms of attachment and commitment.
"You assume I wouldn't want to burn this whole place to the ground."
- lamerde

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RyuuKyuzo
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4/16/2016 8:51:01 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
I think part of the perception that long-distance relationships don't work despite the evidence showing otherwise is that many LDRs these days start out as LDRs (instead of being PR that become LDRs over time), which means you inevitably have quite a few instances of LDRs failing before the two parties involved actually meet, which makes the whole thing feel "fake" in retrospect. It's easy to define the other party in a failed PR as an "ex" because you, presumably, spent a good deal of time with them, but if your LDR ends before ever becoming a PR, it'll seem like it's ending before it even really got started, raising questions about how "real" it was in the first place.

And if you question the authenticity of LDRs in the first place, it's not hard from there to build up the perception that they just don't work, even though in reality they're typically no less stable than PRs, at least for the first several months, if not years.
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RyuuKyuzo
Posts: 3,074
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4/16/2016 8:54:51 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/16/2016 8:51:01 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
I think part of the perception that long-distance relationships don't work despite the evidence showing otherwise is that many LDRs these days start out as LDRs (instead of being PR that become LDRs over time), which means you inevitably have quite a few instances of LDRs failing before the two parties involved actually meet, which makes the whole thing feel "fake" in retrospect. It's easy to define the other party in a failed PR as an "ex" because you, presumably, spent a good deal of time with them, but if your LDR ends before ever becoming a PR, it'll seem like it's ending before it even really got started, raising questions about how "real" it was in the first place.

And if you question the authenticity of LDRs in the first place, it's not hard from there to build up the perception that they just don't work, even though in reality they're typically no less stable than PRs, at least for the first several months, if not years.

Or alternatively, if the LDR does become a PR, but then it becomes clear you aren't the people you thought you were and the relationship fails, that could also make both parties question how "real" the relationship actually was. In this case, the issue is avoidable by both parties being as authentic and honest as possible, and preferably spending a good deal of time on skype or some other kind of video-chat to mimic physical presence as much as possible.
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TurleDoveSammie
Posts: 298
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4/16/2016 9:28:51 PM
Posted: 7 months ago
At 4/16/2016 1:13:59 PM, TUF wrote:
Just out of curiosity, do they work? Have any of you ever had one?

I actually know a married couple where they were in a long distance relationship and obviously since they are married it actually worked out.