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YYW's Advice to Incomming Graduate Students

YYW
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5/24/2016 1:02:05 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
I know many of you will be graduating college soon, if you have not already. Some of you will be entering graduate programs that are more or less rigorous, whether it's a Ph.D. in a real science, a social science, or a professional school. All are taxing, though some are more taxing than others. This is my advice, nonetheless:

First, don't waste time with things that don't advance your accomplishing your goals. If you're getting a Ph.D., then teaching is going to be something that you're going to at some point or another be expected to do. You might like it, but the reality is that the only reason you're doing it is to serve that university's economic interests. You will not complete your Ph.D. faster by teaching. In the same sense, don't waste time on unimportant triviality, like fighting with your colleagues over their stupid political beliefs, for example (this is more a problem in social science than elsewhere).

Second, realize that you are not an expert, nor will you be an expert, until your degree is complete. This is how you avoid making yourself look like a fool, btw. There are so many graduate students I have seen that walk through their halls and think after one or two years of graduate level coursework that they know it all, or that they know enough, for example, to start inflicting their "knowledge" on the people around them. It's normal to want to apply what you know, but it's not good to do so when you're out of your depth. So, know what you do not know, and that you do not know it. If your ego gets bigger than it should be, other people will tear you down, and likely you won't even realize the impact until it's too late (e.g. you will not get a good recommendation upon finishing to get that sought-after teaching position you are so desirous of). What goes around comes around.

Third, don't bullshit_yourself or others. This is related to the second recommendation, but it's worth expanding on because it's an especially bad problem among graduate students. If you are "that guy" or "that girl" who wants to call everyone out on their being politically incorrect, or who inflicts yourself and your bullsh!t on other people, people aren't going to like you, and your advisor or whoever is in the department will take notice that you don't play well with others. The intra-departmental political stuff can really hurt you, and if you go around beating your chest (which you may even do unintentionally) if you are that--highly stupid--person who thinks that your research is special, or your mastery of the basic concepts of your chosen discipline makes you special, then you are going to have a bad time. In fact, if you are in a non-professional graduate program (e.g. psychology, social science, etc.), then you might find yourself with people who are going to structure your life to weed you out because they aren't going to like you. (I've seen that happen too, to other people, who couldn't play the game. Don't be one of them.)

Be self disciplined. Many terrible students think that "cramming" before an exam is a good or at least a sufficient way to study. They lie to themselves. You must invest the time and energy required to take exams/comprehensives/qualifying exams. If you do not do that, you will fail and embarrass yourself (unless you are in a non-professional school, like, again, social science, or psychology). But, even if you are in a non-professional school, do not kid yourself... those exams can be hard. They are meant to be hard. If you don't take the time to learn the sh!t you are sacrificing your life to learn, you're going to have a bad time. Don't have a bad time. Keep your sh!t in line.

Another aspect of self discipline is maintaining physical and mental health. Many of you handle stress well, but most people in general do not. Know what is within your control and what is not within your control. Worry only about things within your control. Exercise regularly (both for the physical and intellectual benefit). Maintain a proper diet. Socialize. Balance coursework with other life commitments. But above all, keep your eye on the ball. Keeping your eye on the ball means not losing track of where you are and what you're doing because of day-to-day nonsense or happenings. You have to see yourself as on a spectrum of time moving towards an end. Orient your actions towards accomplishment of that end. This is how you keep your sh!t together.

One final note: Do not have sex with undergraduates in classes you TA, if you are a TA. That can literally ruin your career, before it even begins. It happens, and you will see it happen. But don't fvcking do it.
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NothingSpecial99
Posts: 378
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5/24/2016 1:07:12 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/24/2016 1:02:05 PM, YYW wrote:
I know many of you will be graduating college soon, if you have not already. Some of you will be entering graduate programs that are more or less rigorous, whether it's a Ph.D. in a real science, a social science, or a professional school. All are taxing, though some are more taxing than others. This is my advice, nonetheless:

First, don't waste time with things that don't advance your accomplishing your goals. If you're getting a Ph.D., then teaching is going to be something that you're going to at some point or another be expected to do. You might like it, but the reality is that the only reason you're doing it is to serve that university's economic interests. You will not complete your Ph.D. faster by teaching. In the same sense, don't waste time on unimportant triviality, like fighting with your colleagues over their stupid political beliefs, for example (this is more a problem in social science than elsewhere).

Second, realize that you are not an expert, nor will you be an expert, until your degree is complete. This is how you avoid making yourself look like a fool, btw. There are so many graduate students I have seen that walk through their halls and think after one or two years of graduate level coursework that they know it all, or that they know enough, for example, to start inflicting their "knowledge" on the people around them. It's normal to want to apply what you know, but it's not good to do so when you're out of your depth. So, know what you do not know, and that you do not know it. If your ego gets bigger than it should be, other people will tear you down, and likely you won't even realize the impact until it's too late (e.g. you will not get a good recommendation upon finishing to get that sought-after teaching position you are so desirous of). What goes around comes around.

Third, don't bullshit_yourself or others. This is related to the second recommendation, but it's worth expanding on because it's an especially bad problem among graduate students. If you are "that guy" or "that girl" who wants to call everyone out on their being politically incorrect, or who inflicts yourself and your bullsh!t on other people, people aren't going to like you, and your advisor or whoever is in the department will take notice that you don't play well with others. The intra-departmental political stuff can really hurt you, and if you go around beating your chest (which you may even do unintentionally) if you are that--highly stupid--person who thinks that your research is special, or your mastery of the basic concepts of your chosen discipline makes you special, then you are going to have a bad time. In fact, if you are in a non-professional graduate program (e.g. psychology, social science, etc.), then you might find yourself with people who are going to structure your life to weed you out because they aren't going to like you. (I've seen that happen too, to other people, who couldn't play the game. Don't be one of them.)

Be self disciplined. Many terrible students think that "cramming" before an exam is a good or at least a sufficient way to study. They lie to themselves. You must invest the time and energy required to take exams/comprehensives/qualifying exams. If you do not do that, you will fail and embarrass yourself (unless you are in a non-professional school, like, again, social science, or psychology). But, even if you are in a non-professional school, do not kid yourself... those exams can be hard. They are meant to be hard. If you don't take the time to learn the sh!t you are sacrificing your life to learn, you're going to have a bad time. Don't have a bad time. Keep your sh!t in line.

Another aspect of self discipline is maintaining physical and mental health. Many of you handle stress well, but most people in general do not. Know what is within your control and what is not within your control. Worry only about things within your control. Exercise regularly (both for the physical and intellectual benefit). Maintain a proper diet. Socialize. Balance coursework with other life commitments. But above all, keep your eye on the ball. Keeping your eye on the ball means not losing track of where you are and what you're doing because of day-to-day nonsense or happenings. You have to see yourself as on a spectrum of time moving towards an end. Orient your actions towards accomplishment of that end. This is how you keep your sh!t together.

One final note: Do not have sex with undergraduates in classes you TA, if you are a TA. That can literally ruin your career, before it even begins. It happens, and you will see it happen. But don't fvcking do it.

While I'm not entering any graduate school yet, I will be entering the college atmosphere next year as a freshman and I believe your advice can still apply there. But hey, I'm willing to take any advice
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ESocialBookworm
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5/24/2016 1:08:07 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/24/2016 1:02:05 PM, YYW wrote:
One final note: Do not have sex with undergraduates in classes you TA, if you are a TA. That can literally ruin your career, before it even begins. It happens, and you will see it happen. But don't fvcking do it.

Have you ever done that?
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YYW
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5/24/2016 2:33:53 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/24/2016 1:08:07 PM, ESocialBookworm wrote:
At 5/24/2016 1:02:05 PM, YYW wrote:
One final note: Do not have sex with undergraduates in classes you TA, if you are a TA. That can literally ruin your career, before it even begins. It happens, and you will see it happen. But don't fvcking do it.

Have you ever done that?

Never
Tsar of DDO
Danielle
Posts: 21,330
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5/24/2016 9:14:35 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
My advice would be to not go to Grad School until you're a few years into your career. I have no idea why people go to Grad School right after college. It's nonsensical. On balance it won't make you that much more marketable as an entry level employee with no experience. More importantly, your job function (or industry) may change. I started in Human Resources, moved over to Media/Advertising and now I'm in Marketing/Sales. Most people don't know at 18 or even 22 what exactly it is they want to do or will wind up doing.

By waiting to go back to Grad School, you can see if it will actually be beneficial to your career (most statistics show that on a cost/benefit analysis, it is not) and you can choose something that is specifically relevant to your career path. I would also recommend looking up which majors and schools actually provide a valuable ROI on Grad School. It's not that many.
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YYW
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5/27/2016 1:29:37 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/24/2016 9:14:35 PM, Danielle wrote:
My advice would be to not go to Grad School until you're a few years into your career. I have no idea why people go to Grad School right after college. It's nonsensical. On balance it won't make you that much more marketable as an entry level employee with no experience. More importantly, your job function (or industry) may change. I started in Human Resources, moved over to Media/Advertising and now I'm in Marketing/Sales. Most people don't know at 18 or even 22 what exactly it is they want to do or will wind up doing.

By waiting to go back to Grad School, you can see if it will actually be beneficial to your career (most statistics show that on a cost/benefit analysis, it is not) and you can choose something that is specifically relevant to your career path. I would also recommend looking up which majors and schools actually provide a valuable ROI on Grad School. It's not that many.

That really depends on the grad school, and what you want to do.

If you know you want to be an engineer, doctor, or lawyer, then it makes a lot of sense to go directly from undergrad to graduate school. Same if you want to be a professor, though I think most people should not aspire to be professors.

If you want to get an MBA, most business schools (or, the ones worth going to) want experience prior to your admission. So, in that circumstance, you really need to work in the field before you go to grad school.

The sort of "on the line" questions are in fields like public heath. It's nice to have an MPH, but not always necessary for career options. Same with HR. It's nice to have a masters in something, but not required. Accounting kind of works that way too.
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YYW
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5/27/2016 1:41:23 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
@Dani

On an unrelated note... It still amazes me that you're in HR, or were. I have such an overwhelmingly negative impression of HR people, and I don't have a negative impression of you, which creates all kinds of issues.

I'd like to think I have a pretty good idea of how you'd do your job, and that you're good at it even though I've obviously never worked with you.

I also know that every HR person I have ever worked in the same company or firm with has been a stupid, passive aggressive, usually dishonest and inexcusably incompetent troglodyte who neither understands the people they are supposedly paid to administrate, or the jobs those people hold, or what purpose those jobs serve for the organization's interests, or what talents and abilities the people who hold those positions do to advance the organization's overall wellbeing.

Usually, it's simply a matter of getting around HR to get what I need done to the--very limited--extent I have to deal with them, whereupon I always do. But that creates two problems: (1) HR resents the fact that I've jumped over their heads, or gone around them to get what I want, and (2) why are we paying people that employees have to go around?

I guess my question, then, is this:

How do you hire someone in HR that doesn't act like what I described? How do you separate the wheat from the chaff?
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MasonicSlayer
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5/28/2016 2:12:18 AM
Posted: 6 months ago
I have better advice to advise as one too cool for school is me to say to all no matter your degree I'll still burn higher in education to the likes so few can see. When you see I don't bark but my dog can bite better than the institutional grip that chops your wallet to tax the mind less free you've become rich with irony is dummy dumb dumb...my dog is still smarter than you.
FourTrouble
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5/29/2016 3:11:13 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/24/2016 1:02:05 PM, YYW wrote:
I know many of you will be graduating college soon, if you have not already. Some of you will be entering graduate programs that are more or less rigorous, whether it's a Ph.D. in a real science, a social science, or a professional school. All are taxing, though some are more taxing than others. This is my advice, nonetheless:

I'm going to disagree and/or add some nuance to some of these points.

First, don't waste time with things that don't advance your accomplishing your goals. If you're getting a Ph.D., then teaching is going to be something that you're going to at some point or another be expected to do. You might like it, but the reality is that the only reason you're doing it is to serve that university's economic interests. You will not complete your Ph.D. faster by teaching. In the same sense, don't waste time on unimportant triviality, like fighting with your colleagues over their stupid political beliefs, for example (this is more a problem in social science than elsewhere).

I agree with the overall gist here. Don't waste time. Get your PhD done as quickly as possible. Don't spend years writing a thesis. Nobody is going to read it. I'd also go even further than YYW and say forget about classes/grades entirely. People in grad school tend to still be in an undergrad mindset where they put more effort into classes than they should. But the reality is that nobody cares whether you get an A or B when you're interviewing for jobs. So focus on the stuff that really matters, your research.

On teaching, I disagree with YYW. The issue is more nuanced. What you want to do is look for opportunities to teach courses in your field of research. Example: If you're getting a PhD in physics, teaching a physics 101 course isn't going to help you. But if you teach a course on quantum gasses (assume this is your field of research), it'll actually help out in interviews quite a bit. Also, on the issue of teaching, collect student evaluations, emails, anything, in which students express gratitude for your teaching. This helps too.

Another aspect of self discipline is maintaining physical and mental health. Many of you handle stress well, but most people in general do not. Know what is within your control and what is not within your control. Worry only about things within your control. Exercise regularly (both for the physical and intellectual benefit). Maintain a proper diet. Socialize. Balance coursework with other life commitments. But above all, keep your eye on the ball. Keeping your eye on the ball means not losing track of where you are and what you're doing because of day-to-day nonsense or happenings. You have to see yourself as on a spectrum of time moving towards an end. Orient your actions towards accomplishment of that end. This is how you keep your sh!t together.

I'd say this is the most important thing on this list. Don't lose sight of who you are. Too many people do. I've seen friends become people I wouldn't want over for dinner after getting sucked into the bullsh!t and losing sight of themselves.

One final note: Do not have sex with undergraduates in classes you TA, if you are a TA. That can literally ruin your career, before it even begins. It happens, and you will see it happen. But don't fvcking do it.

Lol... for those that can't resist, at least wait until the class is over...

I have a few more points I might add later.
YYW
Posts: 36,355
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5/29/2016 4:03:10 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/29/2016 3:11:13 PM, FourTrouble wrote:
At 5/24/2016 1:02:05 PM, YYW wrote:
I know many of you will be graduating college soon, if you have not already. Some of you will be entering graduate programs that are more or less rigorous, whether it's a Ph.D. in a real science, a social science, or a professional school. All are taxing, though some are more taxing than others. This is my advice, nonetheless:

I'm going to disagree and/or add some nuance to some of these points.

And I'm going to correct you where you're wrong... good grief you have got to stop doing this sh!t.

First, don't waste time with things that don't advance your accomplishing your goals. If you're getting a Ph.D., then teaching is going to be something that you're going to at some point or another be expected to do. You might like it, but the reality is that the only reason you're doing it is to serve that university's economic interests. You will not complete your Ph.D. faster by teaching. In the same sense, don't waste time on unimportant triviality, like fighting with your colleagues over their stupid political beliefs, for example (this is more a problem in social science than elsewhere).

I agree with the overall gist here. Don't waste time. Get your PhD done as quickly as possible. Don't spend years writing a thesis.

If you don't do the writing, you won't get a Ph.D. You have to actually write a thesis/dissertation to get a Ph.D.

Nobody is going to read it.

Except your dissertation committee, who will withhold your Ph.D. until you produce a satisfactory piece of writing. Clearly you've never done this.

I'd also go even further than YYW and say forget about classes/grades entirely. People in grad school tend to still be in an undergrad mindset where they put more effort into classes than they should. But the reality is that nobody cares whether you get an A or B when you're interviewing for jobs. So focus on the stuff that really matters, your research.

This is wrong on every level. Unless you are in business school, your grades will determine what kind of jobs you are offered, if yours is a university that grades and ranks people.

On teaching, I disagree with YYW. The issue is more nuanced. What you want to do is look for opportunities to teach courses in your field of research. Example: If you're getting a PhD in physics, teaching a physics 101 course isn't going to help you. But if you teach a course on quantum gasses (assume this is your field of research), it'll actually help out in interviews quite a bit. Also, on the issue of teaching, collect student evaluations, emails, anything, in which students express gratitude for your teaching. This helps too.

This is also wrong. How well you teach has nothing to do with whether you get a Ph.D. or not unless you massively fvck up. Be nice to students so they give you good reviews. That's really all you have to do.

Another aspect of self discipline is maintaining physical and mental health. Many of you handle stress well, but most people in general do not. Know what is within your control and what is not within your control. Worry only about things within your control. Exercise regularly (both for the physical and intellectual benefit). Maintain a proper diet. Socialize. Balance coursework with other life commitments. But above all, keep your eye on the ball. Keeping your eye on the ball means not losing track of where you are and what you're doing because of day-to-day nonsense or happenings. You have to see yourself as on a spectrum of time moving towards an end. Orient your actions towards accomplishment of that end. This is how you keep your sh!t together.

I'd say this is the most important thing on this list. Don't lose sight of who you are. Too many people do. I've seen friends become people I wouldn't want over for dinner after getting sucked into the bullsh!t and losing sight of themselves.

One final note: Do not have sex with undergraduates in classes you TA, if you are a TA. That can literally ruin your career, before it even begins. It happens, and you will see it happen. But don't fvcking do it.

Lol... for those that can't resist, at least wait until the class is over...

I have a few more points I might add later.

Really, you should not... I mean most of what you added here is so totally wrong it's kind of pitiful.
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FourTrouble
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5/29/2016 4:25:13 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/29/2016 4:03:10 PM, YYW wrote:
At 5/29/2016 3:11:13 PM, FourTrouble wrote:
At 5/24/2016 1:02:05 PM, YYW wrote:
I know many of you will be graduating college soon, if you have not already. Some of you will be entering graduate programs that are more or less rigorous, whether it's a Ph.D. in a real science, a social science, or a professional school. All are taxing, though some are more taxing than others. This is my advice, nonetheless:

I'm going to disagree and/or add some nuance to some of these points.

And I'm going to correct you where you're wrong... good grief you have got to stop doing this sh!t.

First, don't waste time with things that don't advance your accomplishing your goals. If you're getting a Ph.D., then teaching is going to be something that you're going to at some point or another be expected to do. You might like it, but the reality is that the only reason you're doing it is to serve that university's economic interests. You will not complete your Ph.D. faster by teaching. In the same sense, don't waste time on unimportant triviality, like fighting with your colleagues over their stupid political beliefs, for example (this is more a problem in social science than elsewhere).

I agree with the overall gist here. Don't waste time. Get your PhD done as quickly as possible. Don't spend years writing a thesis.

If you don't do the writing, you won't get a Ph.D. You have to actually write a thesis/dissertation to get a Ph.D.

No fvcking sh!t...

I'm saying you should write the dissertation as quickly as possible.

Nobody is going to read it.

Except your dissertation committee, who will withhold your Ph.D. until you produce a satisfactory piece of writing. Clearly you've never done this.

Yes, yes. Your dissertation committee. That's it.

Look, the biggest problem I've seen is people who spend too much time on their dissertation, time that should have been spent doing more productive/useful things. Write the dissertation. Get it done as quickly as possible. Give your committee what they want.

I'd also go even further than YYW and say forget about classes/grades entirely. People in grad school tend to still be in an undergrad mindset where they put more effort into classes than they should. But the reality is that nobody cares whether you get an A or B when you're interviewing for jobs. So focus on the stuff that really matters, your research.

This is wrong on every level. Unless you are in business school, your grades will determine what kind of jobs you are offered, if yours is a university that grades and ranks people.

No. You are wrong here. I mean, you might be right about political science departments. Maybe people care what grades you get there.

But in virtually every other field, nobody gives a fvck. I know with 100% certainty they don't care if you're doing physics, math, biology, chemistry, computer science. I know this with 100% certainty, because I know a lot of people in these fields, people who do the hiring for the jobs you want. They don't give a sh!t about your grades. They really don't. You might think they do. But you're wrong.

On teaching, I disagree with YYW. The issue is more nuanced. What you want to do is look for opportunities to teach courses in your field of research. Example: If you're getting a PhD in physics, teaching a physics 101 course isn't going to help you. But if you teach a course on quantum gasses (assume this is your field of research), it'll actually help out in interviews quite a bit. Also, on the issue of teaching, collect student evaluations, emails, anything, in which students express gratitude for your teaching. This helps too.

This is also wrong. How well you teach has nothing to do with whether you get a Ph.D. or not unless you massively fvck up. Be nice to students so they give you good reviews. That's really all you have to do.

Read what I wrote. I didn't say anything about "whether" you get a PhD. I'm referring specifically to whether you get the job you want after you get your PhD. That means not only getting a PhD but making yourself competitive for job interviews after-the-fact. For that sort of thing, teaching specific sorts of classes will undoubtedly give you an edge over others.

Another aspect of self discipline is maintaining physical and mental health. Many of you handle stress well, but most people in general do not. Know what is within your control and what is not within your control. Worry only about things within your control. Exercise regularly (both for the physical and intellectual benefit). Maintain a proper diet. Socialize. Balance coursework with other life commitments. But above all, keep your eye on the ball. Keeping your eye on the ball means not losing track of where you are and what you're doing because of day-to-day nonsense or happenings. You have to see yourself as on a spectrum of time moving towards an end. Orient your actions towards accomplishment of that end. This is how you keep your sh!t together.

I'd say this is the most important thing on this list. Don't lose sight of who you are. Too many people do. I've seen friends become people I wouldn't want over for dinner after getting sucked into the bullsh!t and losing sight of themselves.

One final note: Do not have sex with undergraduates in classes you TA, if you are a TA. That can literally ruin your career, before it even begins. It happens, and you will see it happen. But don't fvcking do it.

Lol... for those that can't resist, at least wait until the class is over...

I have a few more points I might add later.

Really, you should not... I mean most of what you added here is so totally wrong it's kind of pitiful.

No. It's not wrong. It's pitiful that you immediately have dismissed it, while being absurdly wrong yourself.
YYW
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5/29/2016 4:42:24 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/29/2016 4:25:13 PM, FourTrouble wrote:
At 5/29/2016 4:03:10 PM, YYW wrote:
At 5/29/2016 3:11:13 PM, FourTrouble wrote:
At 5/24/2016 1:02:05 PM, YYW wrote:
I know many of you will be graduating college soon, if you have not already. Some of you will be entering graduate programs that are more or less rigorous, whether it's a Ph.D. in a real science, a social science, or a professional school. All are taxing, though some are more taxing than others. This is my advice, nonetheless:

I'm going to disagree and/or add some nuance to some of these points.

And I'm going to correct you where you're wrong... good grief you have got to stop doing this sh!t.

First, don't waste time with things that don't advance your accomplishing your goals. If you're getting a Ph.D., then teaching is going to be something that you're going to at some point or another be expected to do. You might like it, but the reality is that the only reason you're doing it is to serve that university's economic interests. You will not complete your Ph.D. faster by teaching. In the same sense, don't waste time on unimportant triviality, like fighting with your colleagues over their stupid political beliefs, for example (this is more a problem in social science than elsewhere).

I agree with the overall gist here. Don't waste time. Get your PhD done as quickly as possible. Don't spend years writing a thesis.

If you don't do the writing, you won't get a Ph.D. You have to actually write a thesis/dissertation to get a Ph.D.

No fvcking sh!t...

I'm saying you should write the dissertation as quickly as possible.

Nobody is going to read it.

Except your dissertation committee, who will withhold your Ph.D. until you produce a satisfactory piece of writing. Clearly you've never done this.

Yes, yes. Your dissertation committee. That's it.

Look, the biggest problem I've seen is people who spend too much time on their dissertation, time that should have been spent doing more productive/useful things. Write the dissertation. Get it done as quickly as possible. Give your committee what they want.

I'd also go even further than YYW and say forget about classes/grades entirely. People in grad school tend to still be in an undergrad mindset where they put more effort into classes than they should. But the reality is that nobody cares whether you get an A or B when you're interviewing for jobs. So focus on the stuff that really matters, your research.

This is wrong on every level. Unless you are in business school, your grades will determine what kind of jobs you are offered, if yours is a university that grades and ranks people.

No. You are wrong here. I mean, you might be right about political science departments. Maybe people care what grades you get there.

If you're at the bottom of your law class or medical school class, good luck getting any job.

But in virtually every other field, nobody gives a fvck. I know with 100% certainty they don't care if you're doing physics, math, biology, chemistry, computer science. I know this with 100% certainty, because I know a lot of people in these fields, people who do the hiring for the jobs you want. They don't give a sh!t about your grades. They really don't. You might think they do. But you're wrong.

Then you're not dealing with the kinds of people I interact with. Especially if you're trying to compete for a post-doc spot, your grades matter. Clearly, the people you have been talking to do not know what they're talking about. Comp. sci. is the one exception, maybe.

Reality is this: grades are an indicator of what you know and what you can do. Your argument here suggests that grades are just some arbitrary thing. Granted, they're not the only factor, but they're an important one. If you think otherwise, then you're wrong. Frankly, I think you've just forming your opinion from isolated encounters with people who don't know what they're talking about.

On teaching, I disagree with YYW. The issue is more nuanced. What you want to do is look for opportunities to teach courses in your field of research. Example: If you're getting a PhD in physics, teaching a physics 101 course isn't going to help you. But if you teach a course on quantum gasses (assume this is your field of research), it'll actually help out in interviews quite a bit. Also, on the issue of teaching, collect student evaluations, emails, anything, in which students express gratitude for your teaching. This helps too.

This is also wrong. How well you teach has nothing to do with whether you get a Ph.D. or not unless you massively fvck up. Be nice to students so they give you good reviews. That's really all you have to do.

Read what I wrote. I didn't say anything about "whether" you get a PhD. I'm referring specifically to whether you get the job you want after you get your PhD. That means not only getting a PhD but making yourself competitive for job interviews after-the-fact. For that sort of thing, teaching specific sorts of classes will undoubtedly give you an edge over others.

Getting the Ph.D. is the first step. I feel like if your ego was smaller and your brain was bigger, we wouldn't have problems like this which emanate from you talking about stuff you don't know about.

Another aspect of self discipline is maintaining physical and mental health. Many of you handle stress well, but most people in general do not. Know what is within your control and what is not within your control. Worry only about things within your control. Exercise regularly (both for the physical and intellectual benefit). Maintain a proper diet. Socialize. Balance coursework with other life commitments. But above all, keep your eye on the ball. Keeping your eye on the ball means not losing track of where you are and what you're doing because of day-to-day nonsense or happenings. You have to see yourself as on a spectrum of time moving towards an end. Orient your actions towards accomplishment of that end. This is how you keep your sh!t together.

I'd say this is the most important thing on this list. Don't lose sight of who you are. Too many people do. I've seen friends become people I wouldn't want over for dinner after getting sucked into the bullsh!t and losing sight of themselves.

One final note: Do not have sex with undergraduates in classes you TA, if you are a TA. That can literally ruin your career, before it even begins. It happens, and you will see it happen. But don't fvcking do it.

Lol... for those that can't resist, at least wait until the class is over...

I have a few more points I might add later.

Really, you should not... I mean most of what you added here is so totally wrong it's kind of pitiful.

No. It's not wrong. It's pitiful that you immediately have dismissed it, while being absurdly wrong yourself.

lol dude... sure.
Tsar of DDO
UtherPenguin
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5/29/2016 6:31:36 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/24/2016 1:02:05 PM, YYW wrote:

Could you do a similar thread on highschool graduates?
"Praise Allah."
~YYW
YYW
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5/29/2016 7:16:27 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/29/2016 6:31:36 PM, UtherPenguin wrote:
At 5/24/2016 1:02:05 PM, YYW wrote:

Could you do a similar thread on highschool graduates?

http://www.debate.org...
Tsar of DDO
Opsianos
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5/29/2016 8:28:31 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/24/2016 1:02:05 PM, YYW wrote:
How much impact would you say that your high school grades have on college admissions?
Have no regrets.
YYW
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5/29/2016 8:34:46 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/29/2016 8:28:31 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/24/2016 1:02:05 PM, YYW wrote:
How much impact would you say that your high school grades have on college admissions?

It's about one third of the overall evaluation. Your SAT/ACT scores are a third. Letters of recommendation and extra curricular activities are the final third.
Tsar of DDO
Opsianos
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5/29/2016 9:11:47 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/29/2016 8:34:46 PM, YYW wrote:
At 5/29/2016 8:28:31 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/24/2016 1:02:05 PM, YYW wrote:
How much impact would you say that your high school grades have on college admissions?

It's about one third of the overall evaluation. Your SAT/ACT scores are a third. Letters of recommendation and extra curricular activities are the final third.

Assuming that you aced the tests and you excelled in the last part, could you still get into a really good college even with a B or two as your final grade in your classes in one year, then? I f*cked up real good in freshman year, lol.
Have no regrets.
missbailey8
Posts: 1,881
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5/29/2016 9:17:14 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/29/2016 9:11:47 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/29/2016 8:34:46 PM, YYW wrote:
At 5/29/2016 8:28:31 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/24/2016 1:02:05 PM, YYW wrote:
How much impact would you say that your high school grades have on college admissions?

It's about one third of the overall evaluation. Your SAT/ACT scores are a third. Letters of recommendation and extra curricular activities are the final third.

Assuming that you aced the tests and you excelled in the last part, could you still get into a really good college even with a B or two as your final grade in your classes in one year, then? I f*cked up real good in freshman year, lol.
It's possible. What were the classes?
~missbailey8~

Me: What is the weirdest thing I have ever done?
Solon: Agreeing to date me.

Skep: Bailey, you have sardonic written all over your face.
Annie: She has gorgeous written all over her face!

"[M]en are weak. All of us are weak."
-Fatihah

If you ever just want someone to vent, rant, or discuss anything troubling you, my PMs are always open. Have a fabulous day!

The Clown Queen of DDO
Opsianos
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5/29/2016 9:19:41 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/29/2016 9:17:14 PM, missbailey8 wrote:
At 5/29/2016 9:11:47 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/29/2016 8:34:46 PM, YYW wrote:
At 5/29/2016 8:28:31 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/24/2016 1:02:05 PM, YYW wrote:
How much impact would you say that your high school grades have on college admissions?

It's about one third of the overall evaluation. Your SAT/ACT scores are a third. Letters of recommendation and extra curricular activities are the final third.

Assuming that you aced the tests and you excelled in the last part, could you still get into a really good college even with a B or two as your final grade in your classes in one year, then? I f*cked up real good in freshman year, lol.
It's possible. What were the classes?

Back then, I believe it was AP Human Geo and Jazz Ensemble. Don't ask about the latter. *shudders*
Have no regrets.
missbailey8
Posts: 1,881
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5/29/2016 9:25:58 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/29/2016 9:19:41 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/29/2016 9:17:14 PM, missbailey8 wrote:
At 5/29/2016 9:11:47 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/29/2016 8:34:46 PM, YYW wrote:
At 5/29/2016 8:28:31 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/24/2016 1:02:05 PM, YYW wrote:
How much impact would you say that your high school grades have on college admissions?

It's about one third of the overall evaluation. Your SAT/ACT scores are a third. Letters of recommendation and extra curricular activities are the final third.

Assuming that you aced the tests and you excelled in the last part, could you still get into a really good college even with a B or two as your final grade in your classes in one year, then? I f*cked up real good in freshman year, lol.
It's possible. What were the classes?

Back then, I believe it was AP Human Geo and Jazz Ensemble. Don't ask about the latter. *shudders*
I'd say if you can compensate for that by making more progress into your next three years of high school you should be fine. After all, if you can show progress through a higher grade in following school years you should be good to go. Also, if possible, I'd recommend taking classes where you can get college credits, if that's an option in your school. Those classes offer a great jump start, especially if you don't want to take duplicate classes in college.
~missbailey8~

Me: What is the weirdest thing I have ever done?
Solon: Agreeing to date me.

Skep: Bailey, you have sardonic written all over your face.
Annie: She has gorgeous written all over her face!

"[M]en are weak. All of us are weak."
-Fatihah

If you ever just want someone to vent, rant, or discuss anything troubling you, my PMs are always open. Have a fabulous day!

The Clown Queen of DDO
Opsianos
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5/29/2016 9:34:50 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/29/2016 9:25:58 PM, missbailey8 wrote:
At 5/29/2016 9:19:41 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/29/2016 9:17:14 PM, missbailey8 wrote:
At 5/29/2016 9:11:47 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/29/2016 8:34:46 PM, YYW wrote:
At 5/29/2016 8:28:31 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/24/2016 1:02:05 PM, YYW wrote:
How much impact would you say that your high school grades have on college admissions?

It's about one third of the overall evaluation. Your SAT/ACT scores are a third. Letters of recommendation and extra curricular activities are the final third.

Assuming that you aced the tests and you excelled in the last part, could you still get into a really good college even with a B or two as your final grade in your classes in one year, then? I f*cked up real good in freshman year, lol.
It's possible. What were the classes?

Back then, I believe it was AP Human Geo and Jazz Ensemble. Don't ask about the latter. *shudders*
I'd say if you can compensate for that by making more progress into your next three years of high school you should be fine. After all, if you can show progress through a higher grade in following school years you should be good to go. Also, if possible, I'd recommend taking classes where you can get college credits, if that's an option in your school. Those classes offer a great jump start, especially if you don't want to take duplicate classes in college.

I just graduated from tenth grade, so I only have two years left. This year, I took 5 AP's and got straight A's in all classes, if that counts for anything (I almost aced the PSAT if it wasn't for two grammar problems, and I believe I got a 32 on the ACT when I tried it for the giggles. I'm definitely taking them again next year, lol. Damn). I'm rather screwed for asking teacher recommendations this year, though, because even if I might be somewhat smart, I'm definitely not a good student.
Have no regrets.
missbailey8
Posts: 1,881
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5/29/2016 9:43:12 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/29/2016 9:34:50 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/29/2016 9:25:58 PM, missbailey8 wrote:
At 5/29/2016 9:19:41 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/29/2016 9:17:14 PM, missbailey8 wrote:
At 5/29/2016 9:11:47 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/29/2016 8:34:46 PM, YYW wrote:
At 5/29/2016 8:28:31 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/24/2016 1:02:05 PM, YYW wrote:
How much impact would you say that your high school grades have on college admissions?

It's about one third of the overall evaluation. Your SAT/ACT scores are a third. Letters of recommendation and extra curricular activities are the final third.

Assuming that you aced the tests and you excelled in the last part, could you still get into a really good college even with a B or two as your final grade in your classes in one year, then? I f*cked up real good in freshman year, lol.
It's possible. What were the classes?

Back then, I believe it was AP Human Geo and Jazz Ensemble. Don't ask about the latter. *shudders*
I'd say if you can compensate for that by making more progress into your next three years of high school you should be fine. After all, if you can show progress through a higher grade in following school years you should be good to go. Also, if possible, I'd recommend taking classes where you can get college credits, if that's an option in your school. Those classes offer a great jump start, especially if you don't want to take duplicate classes in college.

I just graduated from tenth grade, so I only have two years left. This year, I took 5 AP's and got straight A's in all classes, if that counts for anything (I almost aced the PSAT if it wasn't for two grammar problems, and I believe I got a 32 on the ACT when I tried it for the giggles. I'm definitely taking them again next year, lol. Damn). I'm rather screwed for asking teacher recommendations this year, though, because even if I might be somewhat smart, I'm definitely not a good student.

It's good to hear that you got A's in your classes this year, at least. Actually, the ACT score you got is above average according to this article.

"The short answer: 20 (composite score) is the national ACT average. About half of students score above that, and half of students score below. The top 25% of ACT takers score about 24 or more, so if your score is above 24, that's excellent. The bottom 25% of ACT takers score 16 or less -- so if you're scoring in that range, be careful!"

http://blog.prepscholar.com...

You can try next year for teacher recommendations, as long as you stay on the good side of most of your teachers. Hell, you can even do it in your senior year, but the earlier you do it the better.
~missbailey8~

Me: What is the weirdest thing I have ever done?
Solon: Agreeing to date me.

Skep: Bailey, you have sardonic written all over your face.
Annie: She has gorgeous written all over her face!

"[M]en are weak. All of us are weak."
-Fatihah

If you ever just want someone to vent, rant, or discuss anything troubling you, my PMs are always open. Have a fabulous day!

The Clown Queen of DDO
YYW
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5/29/2016 10:53:29 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/29/2016 9:11:47 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/29/2016 8:34:46 PM, YYW wrote:
At 5/29/2016 8:28:31 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/24/2016 1:02:05 PM, YYW wrote:
How much impact would you say that your high school grades have on college admissions?

It's about one third of the overall evaluation. Your SAT/ACT scores are a third. Letters of recommendation and extra curricular activities are the final third.

Assuming that you aced the tests and you excelled in the last part, could you still get into a really good college even with a B or two as your final grade in your classes in one year, then? I f*cked up real good in freshman year, lol.

So again, your grades are about a third of the overall evaluation. Low grades can be compensated for (read: negative impact offset) by high standardized test scores, or by later improvement (i.e. you fvcked up freshman year, but got good grades after that). So, let's say that, for example, you get a few D's and a C your freshman year but you get all A's after that, or mostly A's and B's. So, you average out to a B-. That looks more favorable to an admissions department than someone who is consistently a B- student. Realize that college admissions councils not just looking at your GPA, but your whole transcript, to form their evaluation of you as a candidate. That said, if your GPA corresponds to an overall B-, but you're up against another student who is a consistent A- to A, even though you may have had A's all your final year, that first year does put you behind the consistent A student. But, different schools evaluate that differently.
Tsar of DDO
zmikecuber
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5/30/2016 2:47:29 AM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/24/2016 1:02:05 PM, YYW wrote:
I know many of you will be graduating college soon, if you have not already. Some of you will be entering graduate programs that are more or less rigorous, whether it's a Ph.D. in a real science, a social science, or a professional school. All are taxing, though some are more taxing than others. This is my advice, nonetheless:

First, don't waste time with things that don't advance your accomplishing your goals. If you're getting a Ph.D., then teaching is going to be something that you're going to at some point or another be expected to do. You might like it, but the reality is that the only reason you're doing it is to serve that university's economic interests. You will not complete your Ph.D. faster by teaching. In the same sense, don't waste time on unimportant triviality, like fighting with your colleagues over their stupid political beliefs, for example (this is more a problem in social science than elsewhere).

Second, realize that you are not an expert, nor will you be an expert, until your degree is complete. This is how you avoid making yourself look like a fool, btw. There are so many graduate students I have seen that walk through their halls and think after one or two years of graduate level coursework that they know it all, or that they know enough, for example, to start inflicting their "knowledge" on the people around them. It's normal to want to apply what you know, but it's not good to do so when you're out of your depth. So, know what you do not know, and that you do not know it. If your ego gets bigger than it should be, other people will tear you down, and likely you won't even realize the impact until it's too late (e.g. you will not get a good recommendation upon finishing to get that sought-after teaching position you are so desirous of). What goes around comes around.

Third, don't bullshit_yourself or others. This is related to the second recommendation, but it's worth expanding on because it's an especially bad problem among graduate students. If you are "that guy" or "that girl" who wants to call everyone out on their being politically incorrect, or who inflicts yourself and your bullsh!t on other people, people aren't going to like you, and your advisor or whoever is in the department will take notice that you don't play well with others. The intra-departmental political stuff can really hurt you, and if you go around beating your chest (which you may even do unintentionally) if you are that--highly stupid--person who thinks that your research is special, or your mastery of the basic concepts of your chosen discipline makes you special, then you are going to have a bad time. In fact, if you are in a non-professional graduate program (e.g. psychology, social science, etc.), then you might find yourself with people who are going to structure your life to weed you out because they aren't going to like you. (I've seen that happen too, to other people, who couldn't play the game. Don't be one of them.)

Be self disciplined. Many terrible students think that "cramming" before an exam is a good or at least a sufficient way to study. They lie to themselves. You must invest the time and energy required to take exams/comprehensives/qualifying exams. If you do not do that, you will fail and embarrass yourself (unless you are in a non-professional school, like, again, social science, or psychology). But, even if you are in a non-professional school, do not kid yourself... those exams can be hard. They are meant to be hard. If you don't take the time to learn the sh!t you are sacrificing your life to learn, you're going to have a bad time. Don't have a bad time. Keep your sh!t in line.

Another aspect of self discipline is maintaining physical and mental health. Many of you handle stress well, but most people in general do not. Know what is within your control and what is not within your control. Worry only about things within your control. Exercise regularly (both for the physical and intellectual benefit). Maintain a proper diet. Socialize. Balance coursework with other life commitments. But above all, keep your eye on the ball. Keeping your eye on the ball means not losing track of where you are and what you're doing because of day-to-day nonsense or happenings. You have to see yourself as on a spectrum of time moving towards an end. Orient your actions towards accomplishment of that end. This is how you keep your sh!t together.

One final note: Do not have sex with undergraduates in classes you TA, if you are a TA. That can literally ruin your career, before it even begins. It happens, and you will see it happen. But don't fvcking do it.

Also, spelling is important.
"Delete your fvcking sig" -1hard

"primal man had the habit, when he came into contact with fire, of satisfying the infantile desire connected with it, by putting it out with a stream of his urine... Putting out the fire by micturating was therefore a kind of sexual act with a male, an enjoyment of sexual potency in a homosexual competition."
FourTrouble
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5/30/2016 10:02:50 AM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/29/2016 4:42:24 PM, YYW wrote:
If you're at the bottom of your law class or medical school class, good luck getting any job.

For medical school, it doesn't matter. I know this because (a) I know a large number of med school students who I've spoken to this about, (b) I know a large number of doctors who I've spoken to this about, and (c) I've spoken to so many people about this because I applied to med school, and seriously considered that career path.

For law school, as I said, it depends what job you're looking for. Some lawyers/judges care about grades. In the case of law school, it makes more sense, since classes are generally graded on a curve. Even then, I know lots of people at the bottom of their law school class who got great jobs, the jobs they were looking for. For instance, the public defender in Colorado refuses to look at grades. In the tech community, networking/connections are all that matters. But, I'll admit this much: for a certain type of law job, grades matter.

Then you're not dealing with the kinds of people I interact with. Especially if you're trying to compete for a post-doc spot, your grades matter. Clearly, the people you have been talking to do not know what they're talking about. Comp. sci. is the one exception, maybe.

You don't know what you're talking about. Or at least you don't know what you're talking about when it comes to fields like physics, math, biology, and definitely computer science. The people I've talked with are spread across the country (i.e. not isolated in one spot), at the best universities in their fields, and they include a lot of people in Chicago (so I know what I'm talking about applies equally in Chicago). These people know their sh!t. They might not tell you that grades don't matter, because they don't want you to get lazy, but that's the reality of how things work in the sciences.

This is what matters. The reputation/recommendation of your adviser. The actual research you produce. If you've been told otherwise, by a random encounter with a random professor or grad student, you've been told wrong.

Again, I can't speak to political science departments. That's a field you know better than me. But the sciences are something I know.

Reality is this: grades are an indicator of what you know and what you can do. Your argument here suggests that grades are just some arbitrary thing. Granted, they're not the only factor, but they're an important one. If you think otherwise, then you're wrong. Frankly, I think you've just forming your opinion from isolated encounters with people who don't know what they're talking about.

This is wrong. It's wrong on every level. First, I never said grades are "arbitrary," though in some sense, they are. It largely depends on the inclinations of the specific professor you have. It also depends on the difficulty of the classes you take. Remember, grad schools generally don't grade on a curve, so you're not competing against anyone. If a professor wants to give everyone As, she can. If she wants to give all Bs, she can do that, too.

Getting the Ph.D. is the first step. I feel like if your ego was smaller and your brain was bigger, we wouldn't have problems like this which emanate from you talking about stuff you don't know about.

The problem isn't my ego or the size of my brain. It's rather the size of your ego and brain. Your brain is too big, so you think you're beyond reproach. If anyone ever calls you out, you immediately assume they're wrong, because you assume you are the smartest around and thus cannot be wrong.

The reality is that you're wrong sometimes, as is everyone. In this case, I'm right, you're wrong. But rather than give any consideration to what I'm saying, you'll find every possible way to rationalize it as wrong, because that's what you do. You have confirmation bias problems, stemming from your massive ego and massive brainpower. Don't assume for a second that you being "smarter" makes you "right."
YYW
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5/30/2016 2:14:25 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/30/2016 10:02:50 AM, FourTrouble wrote:
At 5/29/2016 4:42:24 PM, YYW wrote:
If you're at the bottom of your law class or medical school class, good luck getting any job.

For medical school, it doesn't matter. I know this because (a) I know a large number of med school students who I've spoken to this about, (b) I know a large number of doctors who I've spoken to this about, and (c) I've spoken to so many people about this because I applied to med school, and seriously considered that career path.

For law school, as I said, it depends what job you're looking for. Some lawyers/judges care about grades. In the case of law school, it makes more sense, since classes are generally graded on a curve. Even then, I know lots of people at the bottom of their law school class who got great jobs, the jobs they were looking for. For instance, the public defender in Colorado refuses to look at grades. In the tech community, networking/connections are all that matters. But, I'll admit this much: for a certain type of law job, grades matter.

Then you're not dealing with the kinds of people I interact with. Especially if you're trying to compete for a post-doc spot, your grades matter. Clearly, the people you have been talking to do not know what they're talking about. Comp. sci. is the one exception, maybe.

You don't know what you're talking about. Or at least you don't know what you're talking about when it comes to fields like physics, math, biology, and definitely computer science. The people I've talked with are spread across the country (i.e. not isolated in one spot), at the best universities in their fields, and they include a lot of people in Chicago (so I know what I'm talking about applies equally in Chicago). These people know their sh!t. They might not tell you that grades don't matter, because they don't want you to get lazy, but that's the reality of how things work in the sciences.

This is what matters. The reputation/recommendation of your adviser. The actual research you produce. If you've been told otherwise, by a random encounter with a random professor or grad student, you've been told wrong.

Again, I can't speak to political science departments. That's a field you know better than me. But the sciences are something I know.

Reality is this: grades are an indicator of what you know and what you can do. Your argument here suggests that grades are just some arbitrary thing. Granted, they're not the only factor, but they're an important one. If you think otherwise, then you're wrong. Frankly, I think you've just forming your opinion from isolated encounters with people who don't know what they're talking about.

This is wrong. It's wrong on every level. First, I never said grades are "arbitrary," though in some sense, they are. It largely depends on the inclinations of the specific professor you have. It also depends on the difficulty of the classes you take. Remember, grad schools generally don't grade on a curve, so you're not competing against anyone. If a professor wants to give everyone As, she can. If she wants to give all Bs, she can do that, too.

Getting the Ph.D. is the first step. I feel like if your ego was smaller and your brain was bigger, we wouldn't have problems like this which emanate from you talking about stuff you don't know about.

The problem isn't my ego or the size of my brain. It's rather the size of your ego and brain. Your brain is too big, so you think you're beyond reproach. If anyone ever calls you out, you immediately assume they're wrong, because you assume you are the smartest around and thus cannot be wrong.

The reality is that you're wrong sometimes, as is everyone. In this case, I'm right, you're wrong. But rather than give any consideration to what I'm saying, you'll find every possible way to rationalize it as wrong, because that's what you do. You have confirmation bias problems, stemming from your massive ego and massive brainpower. Don't assume for a second that you being "smarter" makes you "right."

No, FT. The issue is that you're ignorant, but think you're not. This is sad for you.

Your advice is not only terrible, but facially stupid. Grades don't matter? lol... no one is going to take that seriously, other than a sub-par student looking to feel better about themselves.

Sad.
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YYW
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5/30/2016 2:22:07 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
Realistically, this is third time in recent memory (the politics of rape thread, and the voting thread were the others) where you have quarreled with me over stuff you knew nothing about, where the more you spoke up, the more we collectively realized that you were our of your depth.

I understand your urge to promulgate advice, but more than anything else, you must be right when you give advice. In this case, and in essentially every other case where you have argued with me, you have not been correct.

Bottom line is that it's not about my ego, or my whatever. It's not about me. It's about what was said; and not even the fact that I said it. And if I write a thread, and someone says something that is wrong, that's not going to be something I'm going to allow to simply pass because another person has a "different perspective" than I do. After all, the mere fact that a person has a perspective does not mean that theirs is worth listening too or that theirs is right.

The lower a person's grades in graduate school, the fewer doors will open up. It is just that simple.
Tsar of DDO
Opsianos
Posts: 1,155
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5/30/2016 2:32:13 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/29/2016 10:53:29 PM, YYW wrote:
At 5/29/2016 9:11:47 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/29/2016 8:34:46 PM, YYW wrote:
At 5/29/2016 8:28:31 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/24/2016 1:02:05 PM, YYW wrote:
How much impact would you say that your high school grades have on college admissions?

It's about one third of the overall evaluation. Your SAT/ACT scores are a third. Letters of recommendation and extra curricular activities are the final third.

Assuming that you aced the tests and you excelled in the last part, could you still get into a really good college even with a B or two as your final grade in your classes in one year, then? I f*cked up real good in freshman year, lol.

So again, your grades are about a third of the overall evaluation. Low grades can be compensated for (read: negative impact offset) by high standardized test scores, or by later improvement (i.e. you fvcked up freshman year, but got good grades after that). So, let's say that, for example, you get a few D's and a C your freshman year but you get all A's after that, or mostly A's and B's. So, you average out to a B-. That looks more favorable to an admissions department than someone who is consistently a B- student. Realize that college admissions councils not just looking at your GPA, but your whole transcript, to form their evaluation of you as a candidate. That said, if your GPA corresponds to an overall B-, but you're up against another student who is a consistent A- to A, even though you may have had A's all your final year, that first year does put you behind the consistent A student. But, different schools evaluate that differently.

Guess Asian parents are actually somewhat right when they say "get only A," lol. I'll probably just focus on extracurricular stuff, then.
Have no regrets.
YYW
Posts: 36,355
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5/30/2016 4:59:18 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/30/2016 2:32:13 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/29/2016 10:53:29 PM, YYW wrote:
At 5/29/2016 9:11:47 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/29/2016 8:34:46 PM, YYW wrote:
At 5/29/2016 8:28:31 PM, Opsianos wrote:
At 5/24/2016 1:02:05 PM, YYW wrote:
How much impact would you say that your high school grades have on college admissions?

It's about one third of the overall evaluation. Your SAT/ACT scores are a third. Letters of recommendation and extra curricular activities are the final third.

Assuming that you aced the tests and you excelled in the last part, could you still get into a really good college even with a B or two as your final grade in your classes in one year, then? I f*cked up real good in freshman year, lol.

So again, your grades are about a third of the overall evaluation. Low grades can be compensated for (read: negative impact offset) by high standardized test scores, or by later improvement (i.e. you fvcked up freshman year, but got good grades after that). So, let's say that, for example, you get a few D's and a C your freshman year but you get all A's after that, or mostly A's and B's. So, you average out to a B-. That looks more favorable to an admissions department than someone who is consistently a B- student. Realize that college admissions councils not just looking at your GPA, but your whole transcript, to form their evaluation of you as a candidate. That said, if your GPA corresponds to an overall B-, but you're up against another student who is a consistent A- to A, even though you may have had A's all your final year, that first year does put you behind the consistent A student. But, different schools evaluate that differently.

Guess Asian parents are actually somewhat right when they say "get only A," lol. I'll probably just focus on extracurricular stuff, then.

Realize, though, that different schools have different standards. You can get into, for example, the University of California with an A-B average, assuming your test scores are decent. It depends, most critically, on the specific criteria for the school you're applying too.

As a rule, I suggest the following:

Apply to at least three dream schools, three realistic schools, and three safety schools. Visit your realistic schools, and safety schools, and maybe one dream school. Get to know what you're getting into and be realistic about your options.
Tsar of DDO
Danielle
Posts: 21,330
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5/31/2016 2:38:49 AM
Posted: 6 months ago
At 5/27/2016 1:41:23 PM, YYW wrote:
@Dani

Thanks! That's a really nice compliment.

Honestly I don't think most people have any intention of going into HR. I hadn't heard of it until college. I think I've mentioned before that I was intrigued by marrying my passion for worker's rights with my love of unbridled capitalism (and I'm often in defense of private industry). I loved the classes, but the HR work environment is god-awful. It's administrative drudgery.

While the classes were all about theory and law, which was super interesting, in practice HR is about recruiting, putting together documents, maintaining documents, sending company e-mails, putting together luncheons and work functions, making sure payroll and benefits are in order, dealing with immigration visas, ensuring labor standards are being maintained, etc. which is even more boring than it sounds. Basically it's lots and lots of paper pushing. So you don't need to be particularly bright or put in a lot of effort to do HR - that is at the lower levels, which are the people that you probably deal with most often.

That's why I left my HR. I will probably go back into HR at some point, but only at the Director level where I feel I can make an actual difference as opposed to just filing all day and taking orders (company policy). Can you give an example/s of the type of BS you deal with in HR? I'm just curious. My guess is that the people are really just miserable and not in a position to be very helpful based on the limitations of their role and assignments. But you tell me.

As far as being a competent HR professional, I think it's one of those jobs where personality and people skills really matter. That happens to be a strength of mine and as such I was really successful when thrown into any HR position. For example on my very first day as an intern, I went to a job fair with recruiters where people (executives) were approaching me thinking that I worked for the company. I basically pretended to know exactly what I was talking about and BS'd my way through, just on being observant and the skill of being a good talker I guess and knowing the right things to say. If you're shy, don't have a knack for reading people, can't think for yourself, can't make good decisions and need your hand held - you won't be good in HR.

In one of my HR roles, I was tasked with Conflict Resolution (my personal favorite part of HR) to resolve issues where coworkers and managers had been reported. Now I had no training or experience in this whatsoever, so I probably shouldn't have been assigned this without my manager prepping me in any way. But he was so busy that he couldn't and I had to completely wing it. There were so many legal implications; I'm pretty sure that was a screw-up on my bosses' part lol but I was a natural. I was just able to identify the problems/solutions and legal implications and had been successful. But I've seen other HR people try to do this and don't know how to be thoughtful enough or assertive enough. It's really a very strange/interesting industry.

What do you do for work?
President of DDO