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How to Enjoy Life After 50?

GeoLaureate8
Posts: 12,252
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2/7/2011 2:05:29 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
I have many times been objected to when I mention that you can only enjoy your youthful and middle years, but I can see no other way. You no longer have the same looks, physical fitness, energy, and social status. I can imagine that the sex life is negatively affected as well, not to mention the body's tolerance of what you consume. It just seems that I won't really enjoy life once I leave my 40s, even though I would like to.

That being said, in a dialogue between Socrates and some other elder on old age, the elder explained to Socrates that the he is happier as a senior because he no longer has the same desires that youth have and he felt a sense liberation because the youthful desires would pull you around and make you do all kinds of things, and that now he is able to simply relax and not be bothered by all that.

This notion is somewhat reassuring, but I'm not completely convinced.
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innomen
Posts: 10,052
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2/7/2011 2:26:47 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/7/2011 2:05:29 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
I have many times been objected to when I mention that you can only enjoy your youthful and middle years, but I can see no other way. You no longer have the same looks, physical fitness, energy, and social status. I can imagine that the sex life is negatively affected as well, not to mention the body's tolerance of what you consume. It just seems that I won't really enjoy life once I leave my 40s, even though I would like to.

That being said, in a dialogue between Socrates and some other elder on old age, the elder explained to Socrates that the he is happier as a senior because he no longer has the same desires that youth have and he felt a sense liberation because the youthful desires would pull you around and make you do all kinds of things, and that now he is able to simply relax and not be bothered by all that.

This notion is somewhat reassuring, but I'm not completely convinced.

I'm not yet 50, but cannot imagine things changing too much for me. So i am writing to you here on vacation in the colonial city of Granada Nicaragua enjoying incredible experiences, weather. We had a 22 year old guy hanging around us for couple days (straight cool kid) because he said we were cool, and he really enjoyed being around us. My "social status" wasn't so great when i was younger. People never took me seriously, and i lacked any sort of authoritative posture. My sexual desire seems to be intact, and my options are actually greater now, not that i need it with a partner 13 years younger who is pretty hot, and also with a libido intact. My financial situation has allowed me to pursue things that i wasn't able to in my youth, and i really have no one to answer to, buy myself and my partner. I take reasonably good care of myself, so my limbs haven't started falling off yet. I am doubtful that i will deteriorate so rapidly because i maintain my mind body and spirit. My age has afforded me experiences that allow me to relate better with more people than previously, and i have remained as open minded as possible to be able to listen to new things and try different things. In general i have fewer fears in life, and seem to have a new freedom that i didn't have in my youth. Happiness is happiness, but it comes in different forms. You may find happiness in a party with girls and booze and drugs on a Friday night, i find happiness on a remote island with the waves lapping at my feet.

HOw you can constantly make such sweeping judgements on something you have yet to experience is beyond me. I don't get it.
askbob
Posts: 7,254
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2/7/2011 2:29:10 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
You have money, free-time, hopefully a partner, children, a good job where you are the boss, retired (if you are fiscally savvy), etc.
Me -Phil left the site in my charge. I have a recorded phone conversation to prove it.
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innomen
Posts: 10,052
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2/7/2011 2:30:18 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/7/2011 2:29:10 PM, askbob wrote:
You have money, free-time, hopefully a partner, children, a good job where you are the boss, retired (if you are fiscally savvy), etc.

Yep.
mattrodstrom
Posts: 12,028
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2/7/2011 4:32:54 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/7/2011 2:05:29 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
I have many times been objected to when I mention that you can only enjoy your youthful and middle years, but I can see no other way. You no longer have the same looks, physical fitness, energy, and social status. I can imagine that the sex life is negatively affected as well, not to mention the body's tolerance of what you consume. It just seems that I won't really enjoy life once I leave my 40s, even though I would like to.

That being said, in a dialogue between Socrates and some other elder on old age, the elder explained to Socrates that the he is happier as a senior because he no longer has the same desires that youth have and he felt a sense liberation because the youthful desires would pull you around and make you do all kinds of things, and that now he is able to simply relax and not be bothered by all that.

This notion is somewhat reassuring, but I'm not completely convinced.

children.. grandchildren.. and contentment.
"He who does not know how to put his will into things at least puts a meaning into them: that is, he believes there is a will in them already."

Metaphysics:
"The science.. which deals with the fundamental errors of mankind - but as if they were the fundamental truths."
innomen
Posts: 10,052
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2/7/2011 7:32:40 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 2/7/2011 4:32:54 PM, mattrodstrom wrote:
At 2/7/2011 2:05:29 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
I have many times been objected to when I mention that you can only enjoy your youthful and middle years, but I can see no other way. You no longer have the same looks, physical fitness, energy, and social status. I can imagine that the sex life is negatively affected as well, not to mention the body's tolerance of what you consume. It just seems that I won't really enjoy life once I leave my 40s, even though I would like to.

That being said, in a dialogue between Socrates and some other elder on old age, the elder explained to Socrates that the he is happier as a senior because he no longer has the same desires that youth have and he felt a sense liberation because the youthful desires would pull you around and make you do all kinds of things, and that now he is able to simply relax and not be bothered by all that.

This notion is somewhat reassuring, but I'm not completely convinced.

children.. grandchildren.. and contentment.

I think Geo has a real hard time differentiating fun from happiness. - They aren't as closely related as you may think.