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Your New List of 5 Favorite Philosophers

GeoLaureate8
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3/21/2011 6:43:00 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
It's been a long time since we had one of these and I'm sure many have changed their list since then. List your 5 favorite philosophers and include WHY.

1. Alan Watts

His philosophies have had the biggest influence on me and align with my views in almost every aspect. He was able to incorporate the teachings of the East, especially Zen, Taoism, and Buddhism, and transmit them for the Westerner to get the best understanding of them. It's like he extracted his own philosophy from this great amalgamtion of ancient teachings. What's great is that he is British and gives a Western philosophy flavor to these Eastern teachings.

2. Martin Heidegger

This is a modern philosopher from the 20th century who still managed to be original despite all the others who came before him. He brought to light a new problem in philosophy, the question of Being itself. He analyzed what it meant to be and discussed the differences in ontological status between sentient beings and the ontic of non-sentients. He went beyond the contemporary Existentialists of his time who said "existence precedes essence" and rejected that saying there is NO essence for existence to precede, just existence. It is the complete rejection of metaphysics and any sort of dualistic thought, yet at the same time was not a materialist. Also notable are his teachings on Nothingness which resemble that of Buddhism. He also was one of the first in the West to do Transmetaphysics.

3. David Hume

I particularly like his Bundle Theory which asserts that there are no objects or people outside of their properties. They're essentially non-existent. He proved this by asking you to imagine a thing without it's composite properties. You can't, because you'd be left with nothing. This coincides with the Buddhist notion of non-self which asserts nothing has inherent self-nature, everything is a composite or bundle as Hume would say. Hume also had excellent refutations of all the sophisticated Theist arguments for God like those from Aquinas and others. He basically laid God to rest with his devastating refutations. Also noteworthy is his overall empirical attitude, contribution to cognitive science, philosophy of science, and many other things. He was also an economist.

4. Krishnamurti

This is a very unique philosopher. He's primarily interested in psychological philosophy and social philosophy as opposed to figuring out how the world around him works. He taught what he calls the Art of Living. His teachings were almost psychiatric and he also heavily focused on the psyche. The reason why he's so focused on the psychological because he said, if you can understand your own mind and how to consciously live in this world, then that is all you need to know. Your own psyche is where it all starts and where it all ends. He would teach against all belief systems and delusions that people use to console themselves, he would teach how to truly accept death without the delusions of an afterlife. He teach how to live without conflict. He would teach that the role of the human being is there is no role, the human being just exists.

5. Aristotle

An innovator. Set the framework for many of the advanced studies of today including science, logic, biology, and politics (though Plato moreso in this case). I like his political theories of the state as a natural entity, what he called the organic state. His version of "state" is not the one typically understood today as the authoritarian controller. But rather he said the state is the natural consequence of human interaction. Starting with the family, the village, and then the state. States arise just because that's how humans organize and is the only way for humans to achieve "good life," meaning living comfortably and with luxuries as opposed to just survival with bare necessities. That's because states provide an infrastructure and exist to make the life of the commune better.

Let's see your lists.
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
GeoLaureate8
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3/21/2011 7:16:30 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
I would like to see everyone's list, but I'm particularly curious to see lists and reasons from TheSkeptic, J.Kenyon, popculturepooka, Vi, Freeman, belle, Puck, Lwerd, and any others that I missed that are philosophy enthusiasts.

(GreyParrot, I'd prefer a serious list please.)
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
GeoLaureate8
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3/21/2011 7:59:11 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 3/21/2011 7:16:30 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
I would like to see everyone's list, but I'm particularly curious to see lists and reasons from TheSkeptic, J.Kenyon, popculturepooka, Vi, Freeman, belle, Puck, Lwerd, and any others that I missed that are philosophy enthusiasts.

I see Cody_Franklin has returned, him too.
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
CosmicAlfonzo
Posts: 5,955
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3/21/2011 8:08:32 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Ouch.. Being on the same list as Interrogator.

To be honest, I don't read into a lot of philosophers. There are a few that stick out as being pretty cool though.

In no particular order...

1. Ludwig Wittgenstein

Mostly for his work on language philosophy, he clearly understood and contemplated the symbolic nature of our means of communication, and realized its limitations. Check out Quietism

2. Albert Camus

Absurdist philosopher. Makes a lot of sense if you've thought deeply about anything, and have been at the crossroads where you realize that you have a desire that is impossible to fulfill due to the absurdity of it. The desire for your life to have meaning when objectively there is none, for example. He advocated keepin' it real, and I like that.

3. Socrates

When I was in school, and had conversations with teachers, they told me that I reminded them of Socrates. Socrates allegedly once said, "The only real wisdom is knowing you know nothing". I can roll with that. You can only be so sure, right? I'd say that Socrates kept it real, but from most of what I read about the guy, he was probably just crazy.

4. Lao Tzu

The Tao Te Ching is deep as fvck. It is debatable whether this "Lao Tzu" guy ever existed.. But whoever wrote the Tao Te Ching was a wise dude. Most people read it, and think it is just a book of contradicting nonsense. In a way, the Tao Te Ching is making fun of those people for their shallow mindedness. It is a thinking man's book for sure. Lao Tzu kept it real.

5. Siddhartha Gautama

Had a fine tuned bullsh!t detector, and was definitely very intelligent. He outlines a very effective method to finding happiness that gets to the root of the problem. Unfortunately, he is very misunderstood. Probably do to the fact that his teachings tend to be presented in translations that come across as archaic and confusing. He always kept it real, and probably smoked weed with Lao Tzu and Albert Camus.

I've always been a deep thinker, and usually I'll read up on a philosopher when someone tells me that they remind me of them. I have my own thoughts, but there is one thing I have learned from philosophy..

People have been thinking of the exact same sh!t for thousands and thousands of years, they have just been describing these things differently. Anyone who thinks deeply about anything is going to read a philosopher and say, "oh yeah, I've thought that before".

Philosophies arise from breaking down mental processes, and examining our assumptions. All this contemporary philosophy? All that crap that was all the rave at the University monocle polishing club 100 years ago? Already thought of, old news.

Human mortality makes it so that we have to relearn the same sh!t over and over again every generation.
Official "High Priest of Secular Affairs and Transient Distributor of Sonic Apple Seeds relating to the Reptilian Division of Paperwork Immoliation" of The FREEDO Bureaucracy, a DDO branch of the Erisian Front, a subdivision of the Discordian Back, a Limb of the Illuminatian Cosmic Utensil Corp
CosmicAlfonzo
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3/21/2011 8:09:40 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Like I said though, I'm not big into philosophers. I prefer to stroke my own cock rather than the cock of some wrinkly old dead dude.
Official "High Priest of Secular Affairs and Transient Distributor of Sonic Apple Seeds relating to the Reptilian Division of Paperwork Immoliation" of The FREEDO Bureaucracy, a DDO branch of the Erisian Front, a subdivision of the Discordian Back, a Limb of the Illuminatian Cosmic Utensil Corp
GeoLaureate8
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3/21/2011 8:11:03 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 3/21/2011 8:01:13 PM, Cody_Franklin wrote:
Ayn Rand
Mitchell Heisman
Bertrand Russell
Jacques Derrida
Friedrich Nietzsche

This thread has introduced a new concept where you have to list reasons why the philosopher is favored. (Unless in your case, time is limited.)
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
Cody_Franklin
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3/21/2011 8:14:55 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 3/21/2011 8:11:03 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
At 3/21/2011 8:01:13 PM, Cody_Franklin wrote:
Ayn Rand
Mitchell Heisman
Bertrand Russell
Jacques Derrida
Friedrich Nietzsche

This thread has introduced a new concept where you have to list reasons why the philosopher is favored. (Unless in your case, time is limited.)

It is limited.
Vi_Veri
Posts: 4,487
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3/21/2011 10:41:00 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
1. Simone de Beauvoir

A powerful feminist figure who both argumentatively and descriptively gave women new found power in philosophy - helping spark the modern feminist movement. She was the originator of most of Sartre's philosophy (his inspiration for his existential brand stemmed from her writings) - which I love. Her writing is beyond beautiful and such fun to read. She cleared up any ambiguous mess that other existentialists caused through horrible descriptions of the philosophy. She wasn't too bad looking either ;)

"I am incapable of conceiving infinity, and yet I do not accept finity." - Beauvoir

2. Friedrich Nietzsche

What more can I say but WOW. Even though I don't like certain aspects of his philosophy (his views on women in particular), I do love what he has to say about nihilism (and how he shoves a stake through it's heart - wait, nihilists don't have a heart :p haha). He helped me on my journey toward atheism as a young philosopher, and has given me the self esteem of individualism - I WILL NOT SUFFER. Thank you, Nietzsche. Also a beautiful read....

"I would believe only in a God that knows how to Dance." - Nietzsche

3. Voltaire

No one makes me laugh more than Voltaire :) I enjoy his wit, sarcasm, and refreshing take on religion and god. Candide is one of my very favorite books. He was a champion of civil liberties. He had BALLS - outright telling religious folks when they were being ignorant and how their philosophy was ridiculous - speaking up about social reform even though there was strict censorship in France at this time. He has the same view on society as I do - and the same humor about it.

"He must be very ignorant for he answers every question he is asked." - Voltaire

4. Socrates

Who's more bad @ss than Socrates? He helped me learn how to truly be a wise person - helped me learn how to question everything. He stood behind his philosophy until his death, being honest with himself and those around him - showing how scared and ignorant we are as a race. He was an awakener.

"From the deepest desires often come the deadliest hate." - Socrates

5. Diogenes

You'll love him too after this video:

Please do watch it all :)

"Most men are within a finger's breadth of being mad." - Diogenes
I could give a f about no haters as long as my ishes love me.
Vi_Veri
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3/21/2011 10:42:12 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 3/21/2011 8:14:55 PM, Cody_Franklin wrote:
At 3/21/2011 8:11:03 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
At 3/21/2011 8:01:13 PM, Cody_Franklin wrote:
Ayn Rand
Mitchell Heisman
Bertrand Russell
Jacques Derrida
Friedrich Nietzsche

This thread has introduced a new concept where you have to list reasons why the philosopher is favored. (Unless in your case, time is limited.)

It is limited.

Or you just can't think of a reason why you like Rand :p
I could give a f about no haters as long as my ishes love me.
Freeman
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3/21/2011 11:13:45 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 3/21/2011 7:16:30 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
I would like to see everyone's list, but I'm particularly curious to see lists and reasons from TheSkeptic, J.Kenyon, popculturepooka, Vi, Freeman, belle, Puck, Lwerd, and any others that I missed that are philosophy enthusiasts.

(GreyParrot, I'd prefer a serious list please.)

Well...

1. Socrates
2. Hume
3. Peter Singer (He doesn't eat babies; the rumors are false.) He does, however, approve of bestiality. ---->
4. J.S. Mill
5. Epicurus
Chancellor of Propaganda and Foreign Relations in the Franklin administration.

"I intend to live forever. So far, so good." -- Steven Wright
Vi_Veri
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3/21/2011 11:37:40 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 3/21/2011 11:13:45 PM, Freeman wrote:
At 3/21/2011 7:16:30 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
I would like to see everyone's list, but I'm particularly curious to see lists and reasons from TheSkeptic, J.Kenyon, popculturepooka, Vi, Freeman, belle, Puck, Lwerd, and any others that I missed that are philosophy enthusiasts.

(GreyParrot, I'd prefer a serious list please.)

Well...

1. Socrates
2. Hume
3. Peter Singer (He doesn't eat babies; the rumors are false.) He does, however, approve of bestiality. ---->
4. J.S. Mill
5. Epicurus

Reasoning?
I could give a f about no haters as long as my ishes love me.
popculturepooka
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3/22/2011 12:01:51 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
I'll get back with the others but I'd like to spotlight Nietzsche. He's my one my favorites.
At 10/3/2016 11:49:13 PM, thett3 wrote:
BLACK LIVES MATTER!
annhasle
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3/22/2011 12:12:30 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
Don't have the time to explain my choices but here's my top 3:

1. Nietzsche
2. Sartre/Simone de Beauvoir (it's a tie)
3. Socrates

I'll write why tomorrow. :P
I'm not back. This idiot just upset me which made me stop lurking.
TheSkeptic
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3/22/2011 12:14:25 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
Reasoning?

It shouldn't be too hard to infer, though he didn't get the chance to fully explain. Given Singer's position as an animal rights proponent, if the sexual activity between a human and an animal were mutually satisfying and consensual in some sense (which is an admitted issue when talking about animals) it's fine. It's a logical possibility given utilitarianism.
mattrodstrom
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3/22/2011 12:22:36 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
zhuangzi
nietzsche
hume
dewey
and.. Mencius is also cool guy :)

I'll try to expand later.
"He who does not know how to put his will into things at least puts a meaning into them: that is, he believes there is a will in them already."

Metaphysics:
"The science.. which deals with the fundamental errors of mankind - but as if they were the fundamental truths."
mattrodstrom
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3/22/2011 12:24:16 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 3/22/2011 12:12:30 AM, annhasle wrote:
2. Sartre/Simone de Beauvoir (it's a tie)

I Hate Sartre... and, though I've only read a little of de Beauvoir.. I hate her too by extension.
"He who does not know how to put his will into things at least puts a meaning into them: that is, he believes there is a will in them already."

Metaphysics:
"The science.. which deals with the fundamental errors of mankind - but as if they were the fundamental truths."
Freeman
Posts: 1,239
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3/22/2011 12:24:58 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 3/21/2011 11:37:40 PM, Vi_Veri wrote:
At 3/21/2011 11:13:45 PM, Freeman wrote:
At 3/21/2011 7:16:30 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
I would like to see everyone's list, but I'm particularly curious to see lists and reasons from TheSkeptic, J.Kenyon, popculturepooka, Vi, Freeman, belle, Puck, Lwerd, and any others that I missed that are philosophy enthusiasts.

(GreyParrot, I'd prefer a serious list please.)

Well...

1. Socrates

Socrates died for what he believed in; that's noble. He taught us how to question and was extremely witty. I like that.
2. Hume

Hume was the ultimate skeptic --- save, perhaps, Rene Descartes. And his contribution to ethics is undeniable. Though, I would seriously disagree with him that it's impossible to derive an ought from an is.

3. Peter Singer

Peter Singer has had an enormous influence on me in the way I approach ethics. His advocation for animal rights, the alleviation of world poverty and his contrarian views make him extremely interesting.

4. J.S. Mill

I like Mill because I am a utilitarian; however, I think his views have been superseded. That's why I am a preference utilitarian. He, and Bentham before him, helped set a good groundwork.

5. Epicurus

Epicurus paved the way for our modern scientific understanding of the world with his materialism. His rejection of divine influence in the world was also very important.

Reasoning?
Chancellor of Propaganda and Foreign Relations in the Franklin administration.

"I intend to live forever. So far, so good." -- Steven Wright
mattrodstrom
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3/22/2011 12:26:51 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 3/22/2011 12:24:16 AM, mattrodstrom wrote:
At 3/22/2011 12:12:30 AM, annhasle wrote:
2. Sartre/Simone de Beauvoir (it's a tie)

I Hate Sartre... and, though I've only read a little of de Beauvoir.. I hate her too by extension.

(Though really I've only read a little of Sartre too.. but I know I don't like him.. he makes a lot out of that whole Floaty Choice thing that I always complain about)
"He who does not know how to put his will into things at least puts a meaning into them: that is, he believes there is a will in them already."

Metaphysics:
"The science.. which deals with the fundamental errors of mankind - but as if they were the fundamental truths."
annhasle
Posts: 6,657
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3/22/2011 12:42:44 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 3/22/2011 12:26:51 AM, mattrodstrom wrote:
At 3/22/2011 12:24:16 AM, mattrodstrom wrote:
At 3/22/2011 12:12:30 AM, annhasle wrote:
2. Sartre/Simone de Beauvoir (it's a tie)

I Hate Sartre... and, though I've only read a little of de Beauvoir.. I hate her too by extension.

(Though really I've only read a little of Sartre too.. but I know I don't like him.. he makes a lot out of that whole Floaty Choice thing that I always complain about)

Lol, I'm not surprised we disagree. :P
I'm not back. This idiot just upset me which made me stop lurking.
Puck
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3/22/2011 1:38:50 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 3/21/2011 10:41:00 PM, Vi_Veri wrote:
1. Simone de Beauvoir
2. Friedrich Nietzsche
3. Voltaire
4. Socrates
5. Diogenes

Diogenes and Voltaire are great. :) Yay for amusing cycnics. ^^

http://rpmedia.ask.com...
GeoLaureate8
Posts: 12,252
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3/22/2011 1:52:40 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 3/21/2011 10:56:20 PM, TheSkeptic wrote:
Meh, I can't feasibly list my 5 favorite philosophers - maybe I'll get back to you in a couple of decades :D

Ok, well make the list however you want and base it on what you currently know now, not what you will know when your 30 years of study have ended, lol.
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
GeoLaureate8
Posts: 12,252
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3/22/2011 3:54:45 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 3/22/2011 3:41:01 AM, FREEDO wrote:
1. Me

2. Myself

3. I

I had already predicted this answer from you.
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat