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Aristotle

LeoL
Posts: 109
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6/22/2011 12:49:55 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Hey Everyone.
Which one of Aristotle's books do you recommend?
I'm thinking of reading his book called Politics, but I'm not so sure which one I should start with.
Ty
Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too? -Douglas Adams
LeoL
Posts: 109
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6/22/2011 12:51:46 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Oh Also, John Stuart Mill... Should I read On Liberty first or do you recommend anything else?
Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too? -Douglas Adams
Rob1_Billion
Posts: 1,300
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6/22/2011 2:00:20 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Come to think about it, in my avatar, Plato is on the left holding "The Republic" and Aristotle is on the right holding the "Nicomachean Ethics." Probably was worth mentioning -_-
kfc
J.Kenyon
Posts: 4,194
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6/22/2011 2:00:41 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 6/22/2011 12:51:46 PM, LeoL wrote:
Oh Also, John Stuart Mill... Should I read On Liberty first or do you recommend anything else?

I would recommend that you not read JSM...
LeoL
Posts: 109
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6/22/2011 2:26:13 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 6/22/2011 2:00:41 PM, J.Kenyon wrote:
At 6/22/2011 12:51:46 PM, LeoL wrote:
Oh Also, John Stuart Mill... Should I read On Liberty first or do you recommend anything else?

I would recommend that you not read JSM...

Why not? :P
Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too? -Douglas Adams
Danielle
Posts: 21,330
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6/22/2011 2:28:40 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 6/22/2011 2:00:41 PM, J.Kenyon wrote:
At 6/22/2011 12:51:46 PM, LeoL wrote:
Oh Also, John Stuart Mill... Should I read On Liberty first or do you recommend anything else?

I would recommend that you not read JSM...

I agree. LeoL, it's not worth your time reading anything that Murry Rothbard would disagree with. He is infallible. It's best to only read one side of an argument and remain completely ignorant to opposing perspectives. It's not like JSM is an influential philosopher or anything.
President of DDO
Merda
Posts: 322
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6/22/2011 2:42:07 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 6/22/2011 2:28:40 PM, Danielle wrote:
At 6/22/2011 2:00:41 PM, J.Kenyon wrote:
At 6/22/2011 12:51:46 PM, LeoL wrote:
Oh Also, John Stuart Mill... Should I read On Liberty first or do you recommend anything else?

I would recommend that you not read JSM...

I agree. LeoL, it's not worth your time reading anything that Murry Rothbard would disagree with. He is infallible. It's best to only read one side of an argument and remain completely ignorant to opposing perspectives. It's not like JSM is an influential philosopher or anything.

Wasn't JSM a liberal in the classical sense?
My manwich!
Danielle
Posts: 21,330
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6/22/2011 2:51:27 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 6/22/2011 2:42:07 PM, Merda wrote:
Wasn't JSM a liberal in the classical sense?

Does it matter? If it's not Tucker, Hoppe or Rothbard it's a waste of time.
President of DDO
Grape
Posts: 989
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6/22/2011 2:57:51 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
I would not recommend reading either of them now for the simple reason that they did not write for you. Instead, I would recommend reading something like these first:

http://plato.stanford.edu... and http://plato.stanford.edu...

They are meant to be educational and is written for a modern audience. I don't understand people who recommend really difficult writers to people who are new to philosophy (and yes, I feel the same way about people who recommend Hazlitt and Mises to people who are new to economics). After you read a summary of a philosopher, if you are still interested read a book that summarizes his or her work in much more detail. By then you will be used to that person and can read specific works by either the philosopher or academics examining specific topics(though the style of the time period may still be difficult).

Well, that's all for now. I just looked up philosophy on Wikipedia for the first time and it looks cool, so it's time to read 1200 pages of Kant...
Xer
Posts: 7,776
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6/22/2011 3:02:23 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 6/22/2011 2:57:51 PM, Grape wrote:
(and yes, I feel the same way about people who recommend Hazlitt and Mises to people who are new to economics)

I disagree about Hazlitt. Economics in One Lesson is probably the best book available for people new to economics.
Merda
Posts: 322
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6/22/2011 3:09:56 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 6/22/2011 2:51:27 PM, Danielle wrote:
At 6/22/2011 2:42:07 PM, Merda wrote:
Wasn't JSM a liberal in the classical sense?

Does it matter? If it's not Tucker, Hoppe or Rothbard it's a waste of time.

I dunno. I like to read Rothbard and Tucker but I still enjoy reading Marx and Kropotkin. They're just interesting reads even if you wholeheartedly disagree with their conclusions.
My manwich!
Grape
Posts: 989
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6/22/2011 3:14:42 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 6/22/2011 3:02:23 PM, Nags wrote:
At 6/22/2011 2:57:51 PM, Grape wrote:
(and yes, I feel the same way about people who recommend Hazlitt and Mises to people who are new to economics)

I disagree about Hazlitt. Economics in One Lesson is probably the best book available for people new to economics.

The best free market biased intro economics book for high school students/normal people who have better things to do than read a 1500 page treatise: http://mises.org...

It's still long but it reads really quickly. I went through parts of it and it is at least adequately detailed and biased.
Xer
Posts: 7,776
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6/22/2011 3:34:11 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 6/22/2011 3:14:42 PM, Grape wrote:
At 6/22/2011 3:02:23 PM, Nags wrote:
At 6/22/2011 2:57:51 PM, Grape wrote:
(and yes, I feel the same way about people who recommend Hazlitt and Mises to people who are new to economics)

I disagree about Hazlitt. Economics in One Lesson is probably the best book available for people new to economics.

The best free market biased intro economics book for high school students/normal people who have better things to do than read a 1500 page treatise: http://mises.org...

It's still long but it reads really quickly. I went through parts of it and it is at least adequately detailed and biased.

Yeah, I read that book a couple weeks ago. That's probably better than Hazlitt's book for those who know nothing about economics.
Grape
Posts: 989
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6/22/2011 3:36:13 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Read Kritik der Urteilskraft in the original German. Don't know German? Learn it. It will be very easy to understand, especially the first time.
J.Kenyon
Posts: 4,194
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6/22/2011 3:39:55 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 6/22/2011 2:28:40 PM, Danielle wrote:
At 6/22/2011 2:00:41 PM, J.Kenyon wrote:
At 6/22/2011 12:51:46 PM, LeoL wrote:
Oh Also, John Stuart Mill... Should I read On Liberty first or do you recommend anything else?

I would recommend that you not read JSM...

I agree. LeoL, it's not worth your time reading anything that Murry Rothbard would disagree with.

My views are probably more in line with Hoppe, Bryan Caplan, and David Friedman than Rothbard...

He is infallible. It's best to only read one side of an argument and remain completely ignorant to opposing perspectives. It's not like JSM is an influential philosopher or anything.

Mill is purely of historical interest. His ideas are fairly dated and they weren't exactly revolutionary when he was first writing, either. If you want to learn about Mill, read a textbook on him.
Grape
Posts: 989
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6/22/2011 3:43:47 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 6/22/2011 2:00:41 PM, J.Kenyon wrote:
At 6/22/2011 12:51:46 PM, LeoL wrote:
Oh Also, John Stuart Mill... Should I read On Liberty first or do you recommend anything else?

I would recommend that you not read JSM...

I disagree. Mill is influential enough that it is important to be familiar with his arguments, he has a well developed but comprehensible political and ethical philosophy, and most of the things he got wrong (as far as we would believe) it is pretty obvious that he messed up. For instance, I doubt that many people think his attempt to reconcile utilitarian and unconditional opposite to slavery is adequate. I would count Mill in my own camp, anyway.
Grape
Posts: 989
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6/22/2011 3:45:40 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 6/22/2011 3:39:55 PM, J.Kenyon wrote:

Mill is purely of historical interest. His ideas are fairly dated and they weren't exactly revolutionary when he was first writing, either. If you want to learn about Mill, read a textbook on him.

This I do agree with. After a certain amount of time passes, the scholarship on a philosopher has become more relevant than his or her actual work. Mill is most important because of his impact on the history of philosophy and because of those he influenced.