Total Posts:261|Showing Posts:1-30|Last Page
Jump to topic:

Atheists:How does the Afterlife make you feel

Wnope
Posts: 6,924
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/28/2011 8:11:44 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
I'm just curious as to what others who believe nothing is after death feel like.

Does the idea that there is no soul, no afterlife whatsoever bother you, comfort you, or are you generally indifferent to it?
socialpinko
Posts: 10,458
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/28/2011 8:16:17 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/28/2011 8:11:44 PM, Wnope wrote:
I'm just curious as to what others who believe nothing is after death feel like.

Does the idea that there is no soul, no afterlife whatsoever bother you, comfort you, or are you generally indifferent to it?

I generally feel indifferent since I only believed in it as a small child anyways. Because of that I don't think my belief was ever really "real" enough in it to affect me as I get older. I think people are only freaked out by the concept of no life after death if they have had strong convictions in it before. Since I never did, my opinion is more neutral.
: At 9/29/2014 10:55:59 AM, imabench wrote:
: : At 9/29/2014 9:43:46 AM, kbub wrote:
: :
: : DDO should discredit support of sexual violence at any time and in every way.
:
: I disagree.
CosmicAlfonzo
Posts: 5,955
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/28/2011 8:27:06 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
I am content with the thought that this is the only life that I have.

I do not fear death, if I am dead, I will not know any better, right?

If there is an afterlife, I will definitely be surprised. If in the afterlife I find that I am going to hell, I will have no regrets, and I will not feel that I am to blame. I am humble enough to admit that there is no way that I could have went any other way than what I have.

If God is truly just and understanding, I am confident that I will be forgiven for my honesty alone.
Official "High Priest of Secular Affairs and Transient Distributor of Sonic Apple Seeds relating to the Reptilian Division of Paperwork Immoliation" of The FREEDO Bureaucracy, a DDO branch of the Erisian Front, a subdivision of the Discordian Back, a Limb of the Illuminatian Cosmic Utensil Corp
Kleptin
Posts: 5,095
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/28/2011 8:29:05 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
For me, it is beyond frightening. One of the most terrifying things I can think of. When I first start to think about it, its nothing. When I really start to wrap my mind around the fact that there will be an end to everything I know, to all consciousness, it freaks me out like nothing else.
: At 5/2/2010 2:43:54 PM, innomen wrote:
It isn't about finding a theory, philosophy or doctrine and thinking it's the answer, but a practical application of one's experiences that is the answer.

: At 10/28/2010 2:40:07 PM, jharry wrote: I have already been given the greatest Gift that anyone could ever hope for [Life], I would consider myself selfish if I expected anything more.
socialpinko
Posts: 10,458
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/28/2011 8:37:58 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
I think the greatest comforter to the initial thought of terror that would cross anyone's mind is the analogy by Oscar Wilde I think of post-death being the same as pre-life. We did not suffer a lick or give a single sh1t about anything for billions of years. Then we live for 70 years and it's on to another few billion years of post-death. It puts a lot of things into perspective.
: At 9/29/2014 10:55:59 AM, imabench wrote:
: : At 9/29/2014 9:43:46 AM, kbub wrote:
: :
: : DDO should discredit support of sexual violence at any time and in every way.
:
: I disagree.
GeoLaureate8
Posts: 12,252
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/28/2011 8:45:41 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
I don't know what it's going to feel like after I die, but Im sure it won't be the Judeo-Christian concept.

In theory my consciousness is part of a larger consciousness, but idk if I will be aware of that fact after death or if perhaps a stream of consciousness will continue on in some form, will I remember my illusory identity.
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
Rusty
Posts: 2,109
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/28/2011 8:47:46 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
I've actually started thinking about that as a sort of thought experiment (Is that the correct usage of that term?) given that I'm a Christian, and I don't think I would find the traditional "You won't care when you're dead" answer to be very comforting simply because I'm around now to ponder about eventual non-existence and the lack of everything I know and love, regardless of the fact that I would, at that point, not care. In other words, just because one wouldn't be around to think about it when it's all said and done doesn't seem to make it a less sad prospect. I don't know. I realize this thread was addressed to atheists, so my apologies if I overstepped here.
GeoLaureate8
Posts: 12,252
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/28/2011 8:49:27 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
"I do not fear death. I had been dead for billions and billions of years before I was born, and had not suffered the slightest inconvenience from it."
-- Mark Twain

"Even death is not to be feared by one who has lived wisely."
-- the Buddha

"Where there is nothing; where naught is grasped, there is the Isle of No-Beyond. Nirvana do I call it -- the utter extinction of aging and dying."
-- the Buddha
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
Maikuru
Posts: 9,112
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/28/2011 9:42:28 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
It frightened me a good deal initially. It is difficult to understand how all that you are can, in a moment, vanish. However, now that a loved one recently died and I attempt to wrap my head around the idea that I will never see her again, I am terrified and deadened beyond comprehension.
"You assume I wouldn't want to burn this whole place to the ground."
- lamerde

https://i.imgflip.com...
Man-is-good
Posts: 6,871
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/28/2011 9:48:36 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Eh, it can be terrifying a bit...It reminds me of a part of Hamlet that my English teacher read to us today..."But that dread of something after death,/The undiscovered country, from whose bourn/No traveler returns, puzzles the will/And makes us rather bear those ills we have..."...

But then again, on a less poetic scale, I do enjoy reading about the conceptions of the after-life, especially in my history class...How the underworld, and the life after death, proceeds in several cultures can be aptly put as a manifestation of fears/wonders/, &ct...

Wnope, have you heard of the Neanderthal burials??? I remember reading a section from a history book that stated that it isn't tenable to believe that such burials indicate a belief in an afterlife...Do you agree??
"Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto." --Terence

"I believe that the mind can be permanently profaned by the habit of attending to trivial things, so that all our thoughts shall be tinged with triviality."--Thoreau
socialpinko
Posts: 10,458
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/28/2011 10:05:19 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/28/2011 8:49:27 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
"I do not fear death. I had been dead for billions and billions of years before I was born, and had not suffered the slightest inconvenience from it."
-- Mark Twain

Apparently it was Mark Twain, not Oscar Wilde who said it.
: At 9/29/2014 10:55:59 AM, imabench wrote:
: : At 9/29/2014 9:43:46 AM, kbub wrote:
: :
: : DDO should discredit support of sexual violence at any time and in every way.
:
: I disagree.
Cerebral_Narcissist
Posts: 10,806
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/29/2011 1:53:11 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/28/2011 8:11:44 PM, Wnope wrote:
I'm just curious as to what others who believe nothing is after death feel like.

Does the idea that there is no soul, no afterlife whatsoever bother you, comfort you, or are you generally indifferent to it?

Rather unhappy with the situation but what can I do. Depressed, attempting indifference.
I am voting for Innomen because of his intelligence, common sense, humility and the fact that Juggle appears to listen to him. Any other Presidential style would have a large sub-section of the site up in arms. If I was President I would destroy the site though elitism, others would let it run riot. Innomen represents a middle way that works, neither draconian nor anarchic and that is the only way things can work. Plus he does it all without ego trips.
jat93
Posts: 1,440
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/29/2011 5:08:03 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/28/2011 8:29:05 PM, Kleptin wrote:
For me, it is beyond frightening. One of the most terrifying things I can think of. When I first start to think about it, its nothing. When I really start to wrap my mind around the fact that there will be an end to everything I know, to all consciousness, it freaks me out like nothing else.

I know exactly what you mean. It's the scariest thought and feeling... No exaggeration; I literally think it is the most horrifying concept you could possibly conceive. Because every single one of our thoughts are predicated upon our existence... We necessarily take our existence for granted because that's all we know and it's the lens through which we see the world so it's impossible for us to fathom anything otherwise.

That being said, I think it's hilarious when religious people accuse atheists of "choosing" atheism for some kind of comfort, to live a life full of vain physical pleasure without getting judged for it. I don't understand how so much of the world feels that way and doesn't see the irony.
MarquisX
Posts: 925
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/29/2011 7:21:57 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/28/2011 8:27:06 PM, CosmicAlfonzo wrote:
I am content with the thought that this is the only life that I have.

I do not fear death, if I am dead, I will not know any better, right?

Really? The thought of not existing anymore is just whatever to you? It can happen at anytime. Any place. All that you think, you conscience will disappear. That scares the sh1t out of me. To lose all that I've worked for. To lose all that I've loved. To never think another thought. How can I not think? And the scariest part is not knowing you're dead. What's going to be my last thought? Who am I not going to be able to say goodbye too. And its imminence. Everyone reading this will die. No exceptions
Sophisticated ignorance, write my curses in cursive
sadolite
Posts: 8,834
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/29/2011 7:38:06 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
The thing about believing in no after life to me seems sad. Living all those years learning all those things suffering and toiling all for nothing. Why do we even bother in the first place. If life has no meaning in the end, why is such emphasis put on becoming something to look up to and respect. I like the "you have to go to college so you can get a good job and be successful". Why, it doesn't mean anything. Why don't I just sponge off other people and let those morons pick up the tab.
It's not your views that divide us, it's what you think my views should be that divides us.

If you think I will give up my rights and forsake social etiquette to make you "FEEL" better you are sadly mistaken

If liberal democrats would just stop shooting people gun violence would drop by 90%
PARADIGM_L0ST
Posts: 6,958
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/29/2011 12:42:59 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/28/2011 8:11:44 PM, Wnope wrote:
I'm just curious as to what others who believe nothing is after death feel like.

Does the idea that there is no soul, no afterlife whatsoever bother you, comfort you, or are you generally indifferent to it?:

Indifferent on most levels, but disappointing on some fantasy levels. Humans only know what it's like to be alive, even though they've gone billions of years not existing and don't seem too bothered by that.

Death means we don't get to be here anymore, BUT if there is no consciousness after death, then there is nothing to fear.

It's the same principle as flying. On a fantasy level, I would love to have the ability to fly as a bird does, however, knowing that is not a possibility I'm not exactly bothered by that fact. Rather, I'm indifferent to it, even though in theory it would be really cool.

The concept of flying under my own power sounds cool, but since it is not a reality, I'm not bothered by it. The same can be said of an afterlife. The theoretical thought of existing forever and not having this end is obviously a really cool thought, but since I see no compelling reason to assume it, I'm rather indifferent to it.
"Have you ever considered suicide? If not, please do." -- Mouthwash (to Inferno)
PARADIGM_L0ST
Posts: 6,958
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/29/2011 12:44:37 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/28/2011 9:42:28 PM, Maikuru wrote:
It frightened me a good deal initially. It is difficult to understand how all that you are can, in a moment, vanish. However, now that a loved one recently died and I attempt to wrap my head around the idea that I will never see her again, I am terrified and deadened beyond comprehension.:

Are you at all comforted that 100% of all living things have or will die?
"Have you ever considered suicide? If not, please do." -- Mouthwash (to Inferno)
Kinesis
Posts: 3,667
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/29/2011 12:50:35 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
What frightens me is the small amount of time we humans generally have to live. I don't think I would mind death if I had a few thousand years to do all the things I want to. 80 years just seems like such a tiny amount of time. You can't do a lot in 80 years.

I'm hoping cryonics will soon be a viable method of storing my body until some time in the future when we have the technological capabilities to extend life to that extent.
OMGJustinBieber
Posts: 3,484
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/29/2011 12:52:38 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/28/2011 8:49:27 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
"I do not fear death. I had been dead for billions and billions of years before I was born, and had not suffered the slightest inconvenience from it."
-- Mark Twain

"Even death is not to be feared by one who has lived wisely."
-- the Buddha

"Where there is nothing; where naught is grasped, there is the Isle of No-Beyond. Nirvana do I call it -- the utter extinction of aging and dying."
-- the Buddha

Smart quotes from smart men. My outlook on life resembles buddhism in some aspects - none of the reincarnation or karma, but the four noble truths do appeal to me.
Wnope
Posts: 6,924
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/29/2011 1:38:07 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/28/2011 9:48:36 PM, Man-is-good wrote:
Eh, it can be terrifying a bit...It reminds me of a part of Hamlet that my English teacher read to us today..."But that dread of something after death,/The undiscovered country, from whose bourn/No traveler returns, puzzles the will/And makes us rather bear those ills we have..."...

But then again, on a less poetic scale, I do enjoy reading about the conceptions of the after-life, especially in my history class...How the underworld, and the life after death, proceeds in several cultures can be aptly put as a manifestation of fears/wonders/, &ct...

Wnope, have you heard of the Neanderthal burials??? I remember reading a section from a history book that stated that it isn't tenable to believe that such burials indicate a belief in an afterlife...Do you agree??

I would say neanderthal burials at the least show some form of ritual were they acknowledged people are more than just hunks of meat.

But you've got to be careful about wondering how these things develop. For instance, agriculture probably came about not through someone saying "let's plant something, sit around for eight months, and hope something happens."

More likely, hunter-gatherers that made certain yearly migrations found that the places where they crapped out seeds and threw out similar stuff suddenly had things popping up. As migrations continue, the migration patterns focus more on more on these "hot spots" where copious food is growing due to the passing of hunter-gatherers.

From there, they probably developed the techniques until it became a full time job and migration was no longer a possibility in order to maintain food sources.

So, if next to neanderthal burial, we found an acre of some sort of plant, the immediate response would be "neanderthals discovered agriculture."

In that sense, it is misleading to assume that flowers at a burial site necessarily mean there was some sense of the afterlife.

That said, I wouldn't be surprised if it was a afterlife ritual, it just isn't as clear-cut as it sees.
Maikuru
Posts: 9,112
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/29/2011 7:01:01 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/29/2011 12:44:37 PM, PARADIGM_L0ST wrote:
At 10/28/2011 9:42:28 PM, Maikuru wrote:
It frightened me a good deal initially. It is difficult to understand how all that you are can, in a moment, vanish. However, now that a loved one recently died and I attempt to wrap my head around the idea that I will never see her again, I am terrified and deadened beyond comprehension.:

Are you at all comforted that 100% of all living things have or will die?

No. Unless one wishes for death, all deaths come too soon. The inevitability of it all is tragedy, not solace.
"You assume I wouldn't want to burn this whole place to the ground."
- lamerde

https://i.imgflip.com...
Kleptin
Posts: 5,095
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/29/2011 7:47:29 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/28/2011 8:37:58 PM, socialpinko wrote:
I think the greatest comforter to the initial thought of terror that would cross anyone's mind is the analogy by Oscar Wilde I think of post-death being the same as pre-life. We did not suffer a lick or give a single sh1t about anything for billions of years. Then we live for 70 years and it's on to another few billion years of post-death. It puts a lot of things into perspective.

That gives me absolutely no solace whatsoever. This was my initial attitude towards death. When I discovered that ut's just word trickery, that it falsely gives the sense that we are still existing after death for a billion years, I started to get scared. Going in depth, REALLY in depth about the relationship between existence and death scares the bajeezus out of me.
: At 5/2/2010 2:43:54 PM, innomen wrote:
It isn't about finding a theory, philosophy or doctrine and thinking it's the answer, but a practical application of one's experiences that is the answer.

: At 10/28/2010 2:40:07 PM, jharry wrote: I have already been given the greatest Gift that anyone could ever hope for [Life], I would consider myself selfish if I expected anything more.
sadolite
Posts: 8,834
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/29/2011 11:24:17 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
If I new with absolute certainty that when I die that would be it. "No sense of anything" No rewards for all my efforts No rewards for anything. I'd eat a bunch of Pills and end it now. My back hurts all the time, I'm getting another hernia. I lost all my retirement money in the housing crash and will never be able to make it up short of winning the lottery. I will have to work until I die, there will be no retirement. I could just skip all that future suffering and be done now. But something tells me that if I did that, the suffering I would endure compared to when I was alive would seem like heaven.
It's not your views that divide us, it's what you think my views should be that divides us.

If you think I will give up my rights and forsake social etiquette to make you "FEEL" better you are sadly mistaken

If liberal democrats would just stop shooting people gun violence would drop by 90%
rogue
Posts: 2,325
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/30/2011 10:28:40 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/28/2011 8:11:44 PM, Wnope wrote:
I'm just curious as to what others who believe nothing is after death feel like.

Does the idea that there is no soul, no afterlife whatsoever bother you, comfort you, or are you generally indifferent to it?

I mean I honestly wish you guys were right. I would like to think that there is an afterlife but I'm not going to lie to myself
nonentity
Posts: 5,008
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/30/2011 11:04:55 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/28/2011 8:11:44 PM, Wnope wrote:
I'm just curious as to what others who believe nothing is after death feel like.

Does the idea that there is no soul, no afterlife whatsoever bother you, comfort you, or are you generally indifferent to it?

To be honest, that doesn't bother me at all. What I am more concerned about is "life" after death, that is, what legacy am I going to leave behind? How will people remember me? What contributions will I have made to impact someone in some way?

I've been in a coma before and I feel like that is how death would be like. There was literally nothing. Doesn't bother me at all. It comforts me in a way, I guess.
Kleptin
Posts: 5,095
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/30/2011 11:10:20 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/29/2011 11:24:17 PM, sadolite wrote:
If I new with absolute certainty that when I die that would be it. "No sense of anything" No rewards for all my efforts No rewards for anything. I'd eat a bunch of Pills and end it now. My back hurts all the time, I'm getting another hernia. I lost all my retirement money in the housing crash and will never be able to make it up short of winning the lottery. I will have to work until I die, there will be no retirement. I could just skip all that future suffering and be done now. But something tells me that if I did that, the suffering I would endure compared to when I was alive would seem like heaven.

I actually know quite a few atheists who are in your position or worse. Do you rent or do you have a mortgage? What about your spouse and children?
: At 5/2/2010 2:43:54 PM, innomen wrote:
It isn't about finding a theory, philosophy or doctrine and thinking it's the answer, but a practical application of one's experiences that is the answer.

: At 10/28/2010 2:40:07 PM, jharry wrote: I have already been given the greatest Gift that anyone could ever hope for [Life], I would consider myself selfish if I expected anything more.
Uiae
Posts: 9
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/30/2011 11:18:50 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
Actually I find the idea of eternal oblivion to be comforting. It means that one can enjoy life to it's fullest, that there will always be some goal just slightly out of reach for which to strain, and you won't have to deal with boredom after a few trillion years of eternity. Most people see death as terrifying because they are losing what they have gained over their life, but I follow a more Taoist philosophy of existing rather than gaining, that life is not about gathering and collecting but instead going with life and experiencing it. When you realize that you lose nothing at the end, doesn't that make the trip more enjoyable?

As an extra point I'd like to say that were there to be some sort of eternal life after death would not one's works be pointless? Why bother to live now when you have an eternity to do so? Perhaps my post is a bit scatter-brained, if so my deepest apologies.
All murderers are punished unless they kill in large numbers and to the sound of trumpets. ~Voltaire
Kleptin
Posts: 5,095
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/30/2011 11:28:34 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/30/2011 11:18:50 PM, Uiae wrote:
Actually I find the idea of eternal oblivion to be comforting. It means that one can enjoy life to it's fullest, that there will always be some goal just slightly out of reach for which to strain, and you won't have to deal with boredom after a few trillion years of eternity. Most people see death as terrifying because they are losing what they have gained over their life, but I follow a more Taoist philosophy of existing rather than gaining, that life is not about gathering and collecting but instead going with life and experiencing it. When you realize that you lose nothing at the end, doesn't that make the trip more enjoyable?

I both admire and envy your viewpoint. Try as I may, I can't make that a part of myself. I also don't see the correlation between the Taoist philosophy of existing rather than gaining, and embracing the end of existence. I myself have embraced certain Taoist principles, simplifying my life, finding contentment in the path of least resistance, wanting less and needing less. I don't want more time to get more money or buy more stuff. I don't want to die simply because existence is not only wonderful, but it is everything that I know.
: At 5/2/2010 2:43:54 PM, innomen wrote:
It isn't about finding a theory, philosophy or doctrine and thinking it's the answer, but a practical application of one's experiences that is the answer.

: At 10/28/2010 2:40:07 PM, jharry wrote: I have already been given the greatest Gift that anyone could ever hope for [Life], I would consider myself selfish if I expected anything more.
CosmicAlfonzo
Posts: 5,955
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/30/2011 11:34:39 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
In all likelihood, when you are dead, you won't know the life you are missing.

I'm sure everyone feels some kind of tension during the moments that lead to death, but really.. You'll be dead.. Who cares.

The best way of coping with the thought of death is realizing the vanity of the existence we lead. This has already been stated in one form or another so far, but a matter of timescale alone doesn't really put into perspective how utterly insignificant our impact is on the grand scheme of things, and how petty our desires are.

While some take the futility of life as being a depressing thing, I say to those people that they only find it depressing because they desire to be more important. There is a great freedom in understanding one's own worthlessness. Gives you a better sense of humor too, if you ask me.
Official "High Priest of Secular Affairs and Transient Distributor of Sonic Apple Seeds relating to the Reptilian Division of Paperwork Immoliation" of The FREEDO Bureaucracy, a DDO branch of the Erisian Front, a subdivision of the Discordian Back, a Limb of the Illuminatian Cosmic Utensil Corp
Uiae
Posts: 9
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/30/2011 11:47:14 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
At 10/30/2011 11:28:34 PM, Kleptin wrote:
At 10/30/2011 11:18:50 PM, Uiae wrote:
Actually I find the idea of eternal oblivion to be comforting. It means that one can enjoy life to it's fullest, that there will always be some goal just slightly out of reach for which to strain, and you won't have to deal with boredom after a few trillion years of eternity. Most people see death as terrifying because they are losing what they have gained over their life, but I follow a more Taoist philosophy of existing rather than gaining, that life is not about gathering and collecting but instead going with life and experiencing it. When you realize that you lose nothing at the end, doesn't that make the trip more enjoyable?

I both admire and envy your viewpoint. Try as I may, I can't make that a part of myself. I also don't see the correlation between the Taoist philosophy of existing rather than gaining, and embracing the end of existence. I myself have embraced certain Taoist principles, simplifying my life, finding contentment in the path of least resistance, wanting less and needing less. I don't want more time to get more money or buy more stuff. I don't want to die simply because existence is not only wonderful, but it is everything that I know.

I see it as beautiful because it is an end, were there no end life would lose it's wonder and become dull. It is the way of things to end, it makes what happened during that period significant, not to the deceased after the fact of course, but to all those who live on afterward. Were there no end sacrifices of one's life would be insignificant, the romantic idea that there are concepts and idea's worth losing one's life for in order to preserve them. Perhaps I'm a bit too much of a romantic but I find the perseverance of life to be an eternal struggle, and for someone to give up that struggle for an idea or person to be deeply touching.

If you want comfort though I must say that there is a decent chance that you will experience some sort of afterlife during your last few moments of life. The brain releases large amounts of DMT (A high powered hallucinogen) during death, and of course time being relative those last few moments may seem like an eternity. Whether you have a good trip or a bad trip though, I just hope that you have a good trip and I'll leave it at that.
All murderers are punished unless they kill in large numbers and to the sound of trumpets. ~Voltaire