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Humans Only Do What They Want To

SarcasticIndeed
Posts: 2,215
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2/16/2012 8:01:17 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Now, I know this is a bit odd topic, but it's something I thought of. Thinking of it, humans actually never do what they don't want.

It's obvious with some things. For instance, if you want to move your left hand, you will do it if you want. However, what if we were forced. Let's say a murderer is about to kill me if I don't give him money.

Now, I don't want to give him money, right? Well, wrong! I actually do want to do that, because, otherwise, he would kill me. It was surely something I wouldn't do under normal circumstances, but in this case, I would.

For another example, let's talk about little children. One bought candies, and now everyone is around him, wanting to take one. What does he do? Well, he certainly wouldn't want to give them his candies, right? But he still does. Would this mean what I mentioned is broken? Well, not really. He gives them candies because if he didn't, others wouldn't like him. His wish to keep his reputation is bigger than his wish to have the candies, so he gives them away.

So, technically, people never do what they don't want to. They do what they like the best, always. This would make some everyday statements quite invalid. So, does anyone oppose this? I would like to hear your comments on this.
<SIGNATURE CENSORED> nac
SarcasticIndeed
Posts: 2,215
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2/16/2012 8:30:15 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/16/2012 8:02:35 PM, UnStupendousMan wrote:
I see your point.

Yeah, it was a weird observation I made one day.
<SIGNATURE CENSORED> nac
Wnope
Posts: 6,924
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2/16/2012 8:31:08 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/16/2012 8:01:17 PM, SarcasticIndeed wrote:
Now, I know this is a bit odd topic, but it's something I thought of. Thinking of it, humans actually never do what they don't want.

It's obvious with some things. For instance, if you want to move your left hand, you will do it if you want. However, what if we were forced. Let's say a murderer is about to kill me if I don't give him money.

Now, I don't want to give him money, right? Well, wrong! I actually do want to do that, because, otherwise, he would kill me. It was surely something I wouldn't do under normal circumstances, but in this case, I would.

For another example, let's talk about little children. One bought candies, and now everyone is around him, wanting to take one. What does he do? Well, he certainly wouldn't want to give them his candies, right? But he still does. Would this mean what I mentioned is broken? Well, not really. He gives them candies because if he didn't, others wouldn't like him. His wish to keep his reputation is bigger than his wish to have the candies, so he gives them away.

So, technically, people never do what they don't want to. They do what they like the best, always. This would make some everyday statements quite invalid. So, does anyone oppose this? I would like to hear your comments on this.

You might want an addendum that humans only do what they want within a set of options constrained by immediate circumstances.

If I "want" to rob a store, and I don't, it is because of deterrents and constraints on how my behavior applies to my want.

I have not achieved my want of robbing the store, all I have achieved is the best option within current constraints (don't rob the store or police will arrest you as deterrence).
SarcasticIndeed
Posts: 2,215
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2/16/2012 9:00:39 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/16/2012 8:31:08 PM, Wnope wrote:
At 2/16/2012 8:01:17 PM, SarcasticIndeed wrote:
Now, I know this is a bit odd topic, but it's something I thought of. Thinking of it, humans actually never do what they don't want.

It's obvious with some things. For instance, if you want to move your left hand, you will do it if you want. However, what if we were forced. Let's say a murderer is about to kill me if I don't give him money.

Now, I don't want to give him money, right? Well, wrong! I actually do want to do that, because, otherwise, he would kill me. It was surely something I wouldn't do under normal circumstances, but in this case, I would.

For another example, let's talk about little children. One bought candies, and now everyone is around him, wanting to take one. What does he do? Well, he certainly wouldn't want to give them his candies, right? But he still does. Would this mean what I mentioned is broken? Well, not really. He gives them candies because if he didn't, others wouldn't like him. His wish to keep his reputation is bigger than his wish to have the candies, so he gives them away.

So, technically, people never do what they don't want to. They do what they like the best, always. This would make some everyday statements quite invalid. So, does anyone oppose this? I would like to hear your comments on this.

You might want an addendum that humans only do what they want within a set of options constrained by immediate circumstances.

If I "want" to rob a store, and I don't, it is because of deterrents and constraints on how my behavior applies to my want.

I have not achieved my want of robbing the store, all I have achieved is the best option within current constraints (don't rob the store or police will arrest you as deterrence).

Well, if you didn't rob the store, it is because you don't want to, due to being restrained (in this case, by law, moral, common sense and whatever).
<SIGNATURE CENSORED> nac
000ike
Posts: 11,196
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2/16/2012 9:02:21 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
I would consider altruism an act against desire.
"A stupid despot may constrain his slaves with iron chains; but a true politician binds them even more strongly with the chain of their own ideas" - Michel Foucault
Ren
Posts: 7,102
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2/16/2012 9:40:55 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/16/2012 8:01:17 PM, SarcasticIndeed wrote:
Now, I know this is a bit odd topic, but it's something I thought of. Thinking of it, humans actually never do what they don't want.

It's obvious with some things. For instance, if you want to move your left hand, you will do it if you want. However, what if we were forced. Let's say a murderer is about to kill me if I don't give him money.

Now, I don't want to give him money, right? Well, wrong! I actually do want to do that, because, otherwise, he would kill me. It was surely something I wouldn't do under normal circumstances, but in this case, I would.

For another example, let's talk about little children. One bought candies, and now everyone is around him, wanting to take one. What does he do? Well, he certainly wouldn't want to give them his candies, right? But he still does. Would this mean what I mentioned is broken? Well, not really. He gives them candies because if he didn't, others wouldn't like him. His wish to keep his reputation is bigger than his wish to have the candies, so he gives them away.

So, technically, people never do what they don't want to. They do what they like the best, always. This would make some everyday statements quite invalid. So, does anyone oppose this? I would like to hear your comments on this.

We spend out lives working so that we don't play; however, if we work in the way that we figure we should, then we will never have the opportunity to play. Moreover, if we simply decided to play, there would never be a reason for work.

Truth.
vbaculum
Posts: 1,274
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2/16/2012 9:51:47 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/16/2012 9:02:21 PM, 000ike wrote:
I would consider altruism an act against desire.

What if you desire to be altruistic. It's possible to desire that your family, for example, benefit at your expense.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it
Stephen_Hawkins
Posts: 5,316
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2/18/2012 4:57:47 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
You're creating an ought from an is.
Give a man a fish, he'll eat for a day. Teach him how to be Gay, he'll positively influence the GDP.

Social Contract Theory debate: http://www.debate.org...
FREEDO
Posts: 21,057
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2/18/2012 4:57:21 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/18/2012 4:57:47 AM, Stephen_Hawkins wrote:
You're creating an ought from an is.

Where is he deriving an ought? He's only stating an is.
GRAND POOBAH OF DDO

fnord
Jon1
Posts: 314
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2/18/2012 5:37:34 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/16/2012 8:01:17 PM, SarcasticIndeed wrote:
Now, I know this is a bit odd topic, but it's something I thought of. Thinking of it, humans actually never do what they don't want.

It's obvious with some things. For instance, if you want to move your left hand, you will do it if you want. However, what if we were forced. Let's say a murderer is about to kill me if I don't give him money.

Now, I don't want to give him money, right? Well, wrong! I actually do want to do that, because, otherwise, he would kill me. It was surely something I wouldn't do under normal circumstances, but in this case, I would.

For another example, let's talk about little children. One bought candies, and now everyone is around him, wanting to take one. What does he do? Well, he certainly wouldn't want to give them his candies, right? But he still does. Would this mean what I mentioned is broken? Well, not really. He gives them candies because if he didn't, others wouldn't like him. His wish to keep his reputation is bigger than his wish to have the candies, so he gives them away.

So, technically, people never do what they don't want to. They do what they like the best, always. This would make some everyday statements quite invalid. So, does anyone oppose this? I would like to hear your comments on this.

It's kinda a given that desire comes before action.
The_Fool_on_the_hill
Posts: 6,071
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2/18/2012 7:26:07 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/16/2012 9:02:21 PM, 000ike wrote:
I would consider altruism an act against desire.

Pure atruism is simply not even possible.
"The bud disappears when the blossom breaks through, and we might say that the former is refuted by the latter; in the same way when the fruit comes, the blossom may be explained to be a false form of the plant's existence, for the fruit appears as its true nature in place of the blossom. These stages are not merely differentiated; they supplant one another as being incompatible with one another." G. W. F. HEGEL
Stephen_Hawkins
Posts: 5,316
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2/18/2012 7:49:19 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/18/2012 4:57:21 PM, FREEDO wrote:
At 2/18/2012 4:57:47 AM, Stephen_Hawkins wrote:
You're creating an ought from an is.

Where is he deriving an ought? He's only stating an is.

Sorry, I read only as ought. Fail.

But isn't this a necessary statement based on your empirical form of testing? i.e. Humans do what they want to do. We know this because they choose a certain action over another. So whatever they choose, they do because they want to.

That's like saying whenever you play football, you act. It's a necessity, and there is no way of humans being able to do what they don't want to do.
Give a man a fish, he'll eat for a day. Teach him how to be Gay, he'll positively influence the GDP.

Social Contract Theory debate: http://www.debate.org...
SarcasticIndeed
Posts: 2,215
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2/19/2012 5:49:32 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/18/2012 7:49:19 PM, Stephen_Hawkins wrote:
At 2/18/2012 4:57:21 PM, FREEDO wrote:
At 2/18/2012 4:57:47 AM, Stephen_Hawkins wrote:
You're creating an ought from an is.

Where is he deriving an ought? He's only stating an is.

Sorry, I read only as ought. Fail.

But isn't this a necessary statement based on your empirical form of testing? i.e. Humans do what they want to do. We know this because they choose a certain action over another. So whatever they choose, they do because they want to.

That's like saying whenever you play football, you act. It's a necessity, and there is no way of humans being able to do what they don't want to do.

Indeed, I'm just pointing out how silly sentences like "I didn't want to do it, but I had to." would be if taken literally.
<SIGNATURE CENSORED> nac