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Studying Philosophy. Justify it.

Kleptin
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4/5/2012 4:04:30 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
I submit that there is little to no benefit in the act of studying philosophy, philosophical works, philosophers, etc. save for the purpose of learning their mechanisms. The core tenets of what they believe, how they justify those beliefs, are useless.

I state this on the basis that philosophy is something that is completely useless unless it is applied practically on a personal level, with significant impact on one's livelihood.

Philosophical beliefs should be tailored to a person's life, not the other way around.
: At 5/2/2010 2:43:54 PM, innomen wrote:
It isn't about finding a theory, philosophy or doctrine and thinking it's the answer, but a practical application of one's experiences that is the answer.

: At 10/28/2010 2:40:07 PM, jharry wrote: I have already been given the greatest Gift that anyone could ever hope for [Life], I would consider myself selfish if I expected anything more.
Ren
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4/5/2012 4:25:12 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 4:04:30 PM, Kleptin wrote:
I submit that there is little to no benefit in the act of studying philosophy, philosophical works, philosophers, etc. save for the purpose of learning their mechanisms. The core tenets of what they believe, how they justify those beliefs, are useless.

I state this on the basis that philosophy is something that is completely useless unless it is applied practically on a personal level, with significant impact on one's livelihood.

Philosophical beliefs should be tailored to a person's life, not the other way around.

My opinion is that your viewing life a little too myopically if you don't see the purpose of pondering and discussing current dialects and ways of thinking. Without philosophy, we wouldn't even have science.
Kleptin
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4/5/2012 4:26:20 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 4:25:12 PM, Ren wrote:
My opinion is that your viewing life a little too myopically if you don't see the purpose of pondering and discussing current dialects and ways of thinking.

Interesting start, please expand!
: At 5/2/2010 2:43:54 PM, innomen wrote:
It isn't about finding a theory, philosophy or doctrine and thinking it's the answer, but a practical application of one's experiences that is the answer.

: At 10/28/2010 2:40:07 PM, jharry wrote: I have already been given the greatest Gift that anyone could ever hope for [Life], I would consider myself selfish if I expected anything more.
Ren
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4/5/2012 4:26:36 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 4:25:12 PM, Ren wrote:
At 4/5/2012 4:04:30 PM, Kleptin wrote:
I submit that there is little to no benefit in the act of studying philosophy, philosophical works, philosophers, etc. save for the purpose of learning their mechanisms. The core tenets of what they believe, how they justify those beliefs, are useless.

I state this on the basis that philosophy is something that is completely useless unless it is applied practically on a personal level, with significant impact on one's livelihood.

Philosophical beliefs should be tailored to a person's life, not the other way around.

My opinion is that your viewing life a little too myopically if you don't see the purpose of pondering and discussing current dialects and ways of thinking. Without philosophy, we wouldn't even have science.

That should have said "dialectics," but dialects fit, as well. ^_^
Kleptin
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4/5/2012 4:31:23 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 4:26:20 PM, Kleptin wrote:
At 4/5/2012 4:25:12 PM, Ren wrote:
My opinion is that your viewing life a little too myopically if you don't see the purpose of pondering and discussing current dialects and ways of thinking.

Interesting start, please expand!
: At 5/2/2010 2:43:54 PM, innomen wrote:
It isn't about finding a theory, philosophy or doctrine and thinking it's the answer, but a practical application of one's experiences that is the answer.

: At 10/28/2010 2:40:07 PM, jharry wrote: I have already been given the greatest Gift that anyone could ever hope for [Life], I would consider myself selfish if I expected anything more.
GeoLaureate8
Posts: 12,252
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4/5/2012 4:31:50 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Philosophy, the love of knowledge. Knowledge concerns truth. It is necessary to understand the reality you live in. How can you live if you don't know the nature of reality?

Questioning, thinking, theorizing, studying keeps the mind sharp. Some theorizing is useless and unapplicable to reality, but even that provides or leads to better understanding.

Depending on ones metaphysical beliefs, it affects whether they waste this life or cherish it. Depending on soteriological beliefs, it affects whether people love this world and nature, or detest this world and nature because it is evil as opposed to the Godly realm.
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
Ren
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4/5/2012 4:47:24 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 4:26:20 PM, Kleptin wrote:
At 4/5/2012 4:25:12 PM, Ren wrote:
My opinion is that your viewing life a little too myopically if you don't see the purpose of pondering and discussing current dialects and ways of thinking.

Interesting start, please expand!

I'm not sure what direction you'd like me to go...

I mean, the purpose of philosophy is to question. Some people seem to mistake it as some sort of means of categorization, it is to an extent, but so is biology... really, it's a descriptive analysis of life, how we interact with it, and why.

So, in other words, without philosophy, we just do things every day "because we do." However, philosophy helps us establish definitions and procure meaning, so that we can garner further logical consistency in our engagements.
Kleptin
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4/5/2012 4:52:50 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 4:31:50 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
Philosophy, the love of knowledge. Knowledge concerns truth. It is necessary to understand the reality you live in. How can you live if you don't know the nature of reality?

We only need to know reality enough through simple observation in order to survive in it. If you're talking about using philosophy to fully understand the true nature of reality, no one has done that, no one has the capacity to do that, and we're all living.

Questioning, thinking, theorizing, studying keeps the mind sharp. Some theorizing is useless and unapplicable to reality, but even that provides or leads to better understanding.

True. However, that's a pretty broad take on philosophy. You can't infer that for the purposes of this discussion, my definition of philosophy is centered on the formal, written philosophical works of long dead people?

Depending on ones metaphysical beliefs, it affects whether they waste this life or cherish it. Depending on soteriological beliefs, it affects whether people love this world and nature, or detest this world and nature because it is evil as opposed to the Godly realm.

And this is my point. If you can find a legitimate use for philosophy in your life, then it has value. If it does not, or if you are bending your life to fit a philosophy, you've done yourself harm.
: At 5/2/2010 2:43:54 PM, innomen wrote:
It isn't about finding a theory, philosophy or doctrine and thinking it's the answer, but a practical application of one's experiences that is the answer.

: At 10/28/2010 2:40:07 PM, jharry wrote: I have already been given the greatest Gift that anyone could ever hope for [Life], I would consider myself selfish if I expected anything more.
airmax1227
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4/5/2012 4:56:49 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Philosophy got me some fairly easy credits my freshman year of college. I'm not sure if any other justification is needed.
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Kleptin
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4/5/2012 4:57:24 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 4:47:24 PM, Ren wrote:
I'm not sure what direction you'd like me to go...

Yeah, this isn't exactly easy. I apologize. We'll see where you go and I'll focus in accordingly.

I mean, the purpose of philosophy is to question. Some people seem to mistake it as some sort of means of categorization, it is to an extent, but so is biology... really, it's a descriptive analysis of life, how we interact with it, and why.

So, in other words, without philosophy, we just do things every day "because we do." However, philosophy helps us establish definitions and procure meaning, so that we can garner further logical consistency in our engagements.

I think we're still getting clobbered over the difference between a personal philosophy and a personal pursuit of philosophy, and the act of reading the philosophical works of others.

Like you put it, a person who pursues philosophical thought should do so with the intent of finding meaning and purpose to one's life. I addressed this in my opening post and found it to be the only use of philosophy.

What I don't understand is why people attribute any sort of value to the philosophical thoughts of people long gone, despite how renowned they may have been.

Aside from adopting their methods of self-discovery, what exactly compels people to spend their time reading their books, reading their wiki pages, listening to lectures on their beliefs? The purpose of philosophy is to apply it in a meaningful way to your personal existence. Not to bend your existence to a philosophical belief you find interesting.
: At 5/2/2010 2:43:54 PM, innomen wrote:
It isn't about finding a theory, philosophy or doctrine and thinking it's the answer, but a practical application of one's experiences that is the answer.

: At 10/28/2010 2:40:07 PM, jharry wrote: I have already been given the greatest Gift that anyone could ever hope for [Life], I would consider myself selfish if I expected anything more.
darkkermit
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4/5/2012 5:14:38 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Learning philosophy in itself is mainly useless. However the mental gymnastics makes one have a sharper mind. Sort of like how lifting bells has no purpose within itself, but does make one stronger.
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Kleptin
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4/5/2012 5:16:59 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
I can accept that answer. However, to be nitpicky, I would stress the difference between rote memorization of the written works of past philosophers, and actually turning the gears in your own head, which is the "personal" aspect of philosophy I was talking about.
: At 5/2/2010 2:43:54 PM, innomen wrote:
It isn't about finding a theory, philosophy or doctrine and thinking it's the answer, but a practical application of one's experiences that is the answer.

: At 10/28/2010 2:40:07 PM, jharry wrote: I have already been given the greatest Gift that anyone could ever hope for [Life], I would consider myself selfish if I expected anything more.
GeoLaureate8
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4/5/2012 5:17:37 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 5:10:59 PM, FREEDO wrote:
Anti-philosophy is much more useful!

Anti-philosophies like Zen-Buddhism, Discordianism, and Taoism are the result of high level philosphical contemplation.

I still consider anti-philosophy as philosophy. Just like The Critique of Pure Reason is considered a great philosphical work.
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
FREEDO
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4/5/2012 5:29:49 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 5:17:37 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
At 4/5/2012 5:10:59 PM, FREEDO wrote:
Anti-philosophy is much more useful!

Anti-philosophies like Zen-Buddhism, Discordianism, and Taoism are the result of high level philosphical contemplation.

I still consider anti-philosophy as philosophy. Just like The Critique of Pure Reason is considered a great philosphical work.

Indeed. There are two types of truths in this world. Trivial truths that are surely the opposite of what is false and Great Truths which are surely the same as what is false. Philosophy and Anti-philosophy are the latter.
GRAND POOBAH OF DDO

fnord
Kleptin
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4/5/2012 5:37:47 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 5:29:49 PM, FREEDO wrote:
At 4/5/2012 5:17:37 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
At 4/5/2012 5:10:59 PM, FREEDO wrote:
Anti-philosophy is much more useful!

Anti-philosophies like Zen-Buddhism, Discordianism, and Taoism are the result of high level philosphical contemplation.

I still consider anti-philosophy as philosophy. Just like The Critique of Pure Reason is considered a great philosphical work.

Indeed. There are two types of truths in this world. Trivial truths that are surely the opposite of what is false and Great Truths which are surely the same as what is false. Philosophy and Anti-philosophy are the latter.

http://www.mememaker.net...
: At 5/2/2010 2:43:54 PM, innomen wrote:
It isn't about finding a theory, philosophy or doctrine and thinking it's the answer, but a practical application of one's experiences that is the answer.

: At 10/28/2010 2:40:07 PM, jharry wrote: I have already been given the greatest Gift that anyone could ever hope for [Life], I would consider myself selfish if I expected anything more.
Ren
Posts: 7,102
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4/5/2012 5:52:35 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 4:57:24 PM, Kleptin wrote:
At 4/5/2012 4:47:24 PM, Ren wrote:
I'm not sure what direction you'd like me to go...

Yeah, this isn't exactly easy. I apologize. We'll see where you go and I'll focus in accordingly.

I mean, the purpose of philosophy is to question. Some people seem to mistake it as some sort of means of categorization, it is to an extent, but so is biology... really, it's a descriptive analysis of life, how we interact with it, and why.

So, in other words, without philosophy, we just do things every day "because we do." However, philosophy helps us establish definitions and procure meaning, so that we can garner further logical consistency in our engagements.

I think we're still getting clobbered over the difference between a personal philosophy and a personal pursuit of philosophy, and the act of reading the philosophical works of others.

A personal philosophy is the only sort of philosophy you can have, even if it's adopted, I thought... I mean, no matter how much you subscribe to someone else's perspectives, the world is still filtered through your own.

Like you put it, a person who pursues philosophical thought should do so with the intent of finding meaning and purpose to one's life. I addressed this in my opening post and found it to be the only use of philosophy.

Why else would you pursue philosophic thought? It's literally a pursuit for meaning and purpose. I would consider that a primary objective while we're existent.

What I don't understand is why people attribute any sort of value to the philosophical thoughts of people long gone, despite how renowned they may have been.

Because, they respect that person's intellect or the ideas themselves. In other words, if there's someone who's lived longer than you and thought more about a subject much more deeply than you have, but seems to agree with you regarding fundamental issues, then why wouldn't you be interested in finding out where such thought leads?

Let me give you an example. Let's say you're a Christian that has interests in evangelism, but you also happen to be a homosexual ignorant to the homophobia prevalent in the denomination. Well, reading up on some readings and speeches by Franklin Graham may be quite revealing. I would definitely support such an engagement.

Aside from adopting their methods of self-discovery, what exactly compels people to spend their time reading their books, reading their wiki pages, listening to lectures on their beliefs? The purpose of philosophy is to apply it in a meaningful way to your personal existence. Not to bend your existence to a philosophical belief you find interesting.

Surely, you realize that you will never discover anything until you first learn what has already been discovered? How could you possibly reject a belief without learning about it? I claim to be a Christian, but how could I truly claim Christianity unless I've also explored Satanism? How could I possibly follow Christianity if I know absolutely nothing about Judaism? How could I have faith in Christianity if I haven't even entertained the notions in Islam?
FREEDO
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4/5/2012 5:52:48 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 5:37:47 PM, Kleptin wrote:
At 4/5/2012 5:29:49 PM, FREEDO wrote:
At 4/5/2012 5:17:37 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
At 4/5/2012 5:10:59 PM, FREEDO wrote:
Anti-philosophy is much more useful!

Anti-philosophies like Zen-Buddhism, Discordianism, and Taoism are the result of high level philosphical contemplation.

I still consider anti-philosophy as philosophy. Just like The Critique of Pure Reason is considered a great philosphical work.

Indeed. There are two types of truths in this world. Trivial truths that are surely the opposite of what is false and Great Truths which are surely the same as what is false. Philosophy and Anti-philosophy are the latter.

http://www.mememaker.net...

Thank you. That's what I'm here for.
GRAND POOBAH OF DDO

fnord
Lasagna
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4/5/2012 5:55:00 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
I understand what Kleptin is getting at. Plato suggested that people don't even study philosophy until their 30s. I know this will rub ya'll pretty badly, but there is a reason for this - without wisdom, which is a function of experience (age), philisophy ends up being too intellectual and isn't refined. A lot of the crazy opinions on DDO are a good example of this... highly unworkable and utterly useless theories that sound good on paper but when applied to real-world examples they are ridiculous. Ancaps/libertarians and utilitarians for example can talk and talk and talk and talk and talk and talk and talk and talk and talk and talk and talk about their ideas but they provide nothing substantive or prescriptive that makes any sense.
Rob
OMGJustinBieber
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4/5/2012 5:56:05 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 4:04:30 PM, Kleptin wrote:
I submit that there is little to no benefit in the act of studying philosophy, philosophical works, philosophers, etc. save for the purpose of learning their mechanisms. The core tenets of what they believe, how they justify those beliefs, are useless.

I state this on the basis that philosophy is something that is completely useless unless it is applied practically on a personal level, with significant impact on one's livelihood.

Philosophical beliefs should be tailored to a person's life, not the other way around.

You're saying this because, like most people who haven't read much philosophy, you don't understand or see the purpose of it. Philosophical works attempt to answer some of the main questions in life and comment on some of the fundamental aspects of human life. Why does everything need to be practical? Regardless, I would call a lot of philosophy "practical." There is no separation, in the philosopher's mind, between the "real world" and philosophy. To do so is to really undercut philosophy.
Ren
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4/5/2012 5:57:45 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 5:55:00 PM, Lasagna wrote:
I understand what Kleptin is getting at. Plato suggested that people don't even study philosophy until their 30s. I know this will rub ya'll pretty badly, but there is a reason for this - without wisdom, which is a function of experience (age), philisophy ends up being too intellectual and isn't refined. A lot of the crazy opinions on DDO are a good example of this... highly unworkable and utterly useless theories that sound good on paper but when applied to real-world examples they are ridiculous. Ancaps/libertarians and utilitarians for example can talk and talk and talk and talk and talk and talk and talk and talk and talk and talk and talk about their ideas but they provide nothing substantive or prescriptive that makes any sense.

Sounds to me like you and Kleptin somehow perceive adopting philosophies and marriage akin.

Philosophy =/= dogmatism. I'd even consider them antithetical.
Kleptin
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4/5/2012 6:02:06 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 5:52:35 PM, Ren wrote:

Those are all good points. I'll address them all in sort of one "thing.

When people read the works of others, they change. I see a lot of people on this site who are heavy proponents of one philosophical belief, and that's wrong. It's like they've lost themselves and become caricatures of the people that they study. They come across as narrow-minded extremists, but they have a lot of force and fervor in what they say.

Conversely, there are those on this site who seem to be more pragmatic, intelligent, and laid back. They have a comfortable confidence in what they say because they actually understand it both in the context of what they've read and in the context of how it can be applied and understood outside the teachings of whoever they studied.

I personally feel that if you can't develop a philosophical notion through personal derivation, then it has no consequence to your existence. There's no philosophical concept so complex that a person cannot grasp it in a matter of minutes. Philosophy doesn't build upon itself the same way science does.
: At 5/2/2010 2:43:54 PM, innomen wrote:
It isn't about finding a theory, philosophy or doctrine and thinking it's the answer, but a practical application of one's experiences that is the answer.

: At 10/28/2010 2:40:07 PM, jharry wrote: I have already been given the greatest Gift that anyone could ever hope for [Life], I would consider myself selfish if I expected anything more.
OMGJustinBieber
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4/5/2012 6:04:56 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
There's no philosophical concept so complex that a person cannot grasp it in a matter of minutes.

Not sure if trolling or clueless.
Kleptin
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4/5/2012 6:06:30 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 6:04:56 PM, OMGJustinBieber wrote:
There's no philosophical concept so complex that a person cannot grasp it in a matter of minutes.

Not sure if trolling or clueless.

Let's play a game then. You give me ONE philosophical concept, and I'll break it down such that someone can get the gist of it in just a few sentences.
: At 5/2/2010 2:43:54 PM, innomen wrote:
It isn't about finding a theory, philosophy or doctrine and thinking it's the answer, but a practical application of one's experiences that is the answer.

: At 10/28/2010 2:40:07 PM, jharry wrote: I have already been given the greatest Gift that anyone could ever hope for [Life], I would consider myself selfish if I expected anything more.
Kleptin
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4/5/2012 6:07:28 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 6:06:30 PM, Kleptin wrote:
At 4/5/2012 6:04:56 PM, OMGJustinBieber wrote:
There's no philosophical concept so complex that a person cannot grasp it in a matter of minutes.

Not sure if trolling or clueless.

Let's play a game then. You give me ONE philosophical concept, and I'll break it down such that someone can get the gist of it in just a few sentences.

Note: I didn't say an entire philosophy, nor did I say scientific concept. Just one philosophical concept.
: At 5/2/2010 2:43:54 PM, innomen wrote:
It isn't about finding a theory, philosophy or doctrine and thinking it's the answer, but a practical application of one's experiences that is the answer.

: At 10/28/2010 2:40:07 PM, jharry wrote: I have already been given the greatest Gift that anyone could ever hope for [Life], I would consider myself selfish if I expected anything more.
FREEDO
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4/5/2012 6:09:00 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 5:55:00 PM, Lasagna wrote:
I understand what Kleptin is getting at. Plato suggested that people don't even study philosophy until their 30s. I know this will rub ya'll pretty badly, but there is a reason for this - without wisdom, which is a function of experience (age), philisophy ends up being too intellectual and isn't refined. A lot of the crazy opinions on DDO are a good example of this... highly unworkable and utterly useless theories that sound good on paper but when applied to real-world examples they are ridiculous. Ancaps/libertarians and utilitarians for example can talk and talk and talk and talk and talk and talk and talk and talk and talk and talk and talk about their ideas but they provide nothing substantive or prescriptive that makes any sense.

What's wrong with being ridiculous?
GRAND POOBAH OF DDO

fnord
OMGJustinBieber
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4/5/2012 6:17:10 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 6:06:30 PM, Kleptin wrote:
At 4/5/2012 6:04:56 PM, OMGJustinBieber wrote:
There's no philosophical concept so complex that a person cannot grasp it in a matter of minutes.

Not sure if trolling or clueless.

Let's play a game then. You give me ONE philosophical concept, and I'll break it down such that someone can get the gist of it in just a few sentences.

I don't doubt you can give me a one sentence vague summary of any given concept. That's called a google search.

I guess I'll take the bait and ask about Kant's conception of freedom. I recently finished Groundwork so it's fresh in my mind.

In all fairness, you could make a similar claim in many fields when we have the internet at our disposal. But do poor summaries derived from google really count as knowledge?
Kleptin
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4/5/2012 6:20:56 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 5:56:05 PM, OMGJustinBieber wrote:
You're saying this because, like most people who haven't read much philosophy, you don't understand or see the purpose of it. Philosophical works attempt to answer some of the main questions in life and comment on some of the fundamental aspects of human life. Why does everything need to be practical? Regardless, I would call a lot of philosophy "practical." There is no separation, in the philosopher's mind, between the "real world" and philosophy. To do so is to really undercut philosophy.

Though I will grant you that I haven't read much of it, I've learned plenty and I consider myself pretty well versed. A decade of BSing philosophy with internet-people in my free time instead of actively socializing will do that.

My obsession with practicality stems from the realization that I am legitimately happy. Philosophy doesn't have much to do with it in an overt sense. I didn't learn a shattering truth or encounter some sort of world-changing revelation. Since then, what I do is seek happiness in the most simplistic and practical way, and lo and behold, I get it.

There is no use in finding the "fundamentals of human existence" if you don't or can't apply them to human existence, namely your own.

You are inflating philosophy and having it encompass a lot more than it actually does. Granted, the term "philosophy" is extremely broad, but if we're just talking about the act of reading what philosophers of long ago wrote and believed, I have severe difficulty thinking that my life would be better having dedicated those hours to that arduous process.

Yes, I think that's it.

I think that people incorrectly and unnecessarily romanticize the act of poring over the philosophical works of others as a worthwhile activity, they inflate the importance of that trivial act, and they minimize the important part, the essence of philosophy, which is to take the truths you've derived from your own mental gear-grinding, and making your life better and happier.
: At 5/2/2010 2:43:54 PM, innomen wrote:
It isn't about finding a theory, philosophy or doctrine and thinking it's the answer, but a practical application of one's experiences that is the answer.

: At 10/28/2010 2:40:07 PM, jharry wrote: I have already been given the greatest Gift that anyone could ever hope for [Life], I would consider myself selfish if I expected anything more.
OMGJustinBieber
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4/5/2012 6:21:59 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 6:17:10 PM, OMGJustinBieber wrote:
At 4/5/2012 6:06:30 PM, Kleptin wrote:
At 4/5/2012 6:04:56 PM, OMGJustinBieber wrote:
There's no philosophical concept so complex that a person cannot grasp it in a matter of minutes.

Not sure if trolling or clueless.

Let's play a game then. You give me ONE philosophical concept, and I'll break it down such that someone can get the gist of it in just a few sentences.

I don't doubt you can give me a one sentence vague summary of any given concept. That's called a google search.

I guess I'll take the bait and ask about Kant's conception of freedom. I recently finished Groundwork so it's fresh in my mind.

In all fairness, you could make a similar claim in many fields when we have the internet at our disposal. But do poor summaries derived from google really count as knowledge?

Yeah, there are summaries of virtually every topic on like google. I guess what I can say is that if you study philosophy it actually addresses the major questions that people usually presuppose. Like your view that science is cumulative has been heavily criticized by some philosophers of science. Your political views ought to spring from philosophical foundations. Morality, again, is philosophical. All (good) arguments, even scientific ones, invoke philosophy concepts.
Kleptin
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4/5/2012 6:25:35 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/5/2012 6:17:10 PM, OMGJustinBieber wrote:
I don't doubt you can give me a one sentence vague summary of any given concept. That's called a google search.

I guess I'll take the bait and ask about Kant's conception of freedom. I recently finished Groundwork so it's fresh in my mind.

In all fairness, you could make a similar claim in many fields when we have the internet at our disposal. But do poor summaries derived from google really count as knowledge?

Kant's conception of freedom:

Freedom doesn't mean you get to do whatever you want whenever you want, but that you have the capacity to figure out what rules to live by, and stick to them with integrity. That's what it really means to be free.
: At 5/2/2010 2:43:54 PM, innomen wrote:
It isn't about finding a theory, philosophy or doctrine and thinking it's the answer, but a practical application of one's experiences that is the answer.

: At 10/28/2010 2:40:07 PM, jharry wrote: I have already been given the greatest Gift that anyone could ever hope for [Life], I would consider myself selfish if I expected anything more.