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The transcendence of ideas

The_Fool_on_the_hill
Posts: 6,071
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4/6/2012 3:19:35 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Hill Top U and DDO exclusive: The transcendence of ideas (a quick and dirty version)

What is philosophy? A Fools Tale!

The Fool: I will start this article but I am not going to finish in one day or sitting, but maybe over a week. It's not to be debated about or responded to in this thread. If you want to discuss this topic or have objections or suggestions, either make another thread for it or ask me too and I will answer any questions there, and I am sure many argument, and debates as well.

My motivation for this series of article is the lack of cohesion in the understanding of philosophy; I hope to make it much clear and cohesive of what exactly are the differences within the discipline. What is practical and what is not. Where do major ideas which are shape who we are today. We tend to take for granted that what we know is plain and common knowledge, but lots of it took a lot of thinking and reasoning, work and sacrifice of others. That right at least 97% of your ideas are not actually yours per say but they have been picked intuitively by discursive resources in language and conversation that you may have at one time thought of as irrelevant, nonsensical or non-practical.


Discursive resources:
Forms of mediums which communicate ideas.

I hope people take interest, if you have never taken a course on philosophy or only have brush a few courses or topics this should help give you a nice overarching coherence of how it all fits together.

Again pls don't respond in this thread!!!

Kleptin: Philosophy is extremely broad.

The Fool: And that is the problem with a modern account. Which I reject as being the intent of philosophy?

To understand this problem you have to know the history of philosophy, at least western philosophy.

It is Plato/Socrates who defined what a philosopher is. Plato claims that Thales is the first philosopher because he was the first person to try and explain the world without appealing to supernatural or spiritual explanations.

That is the further we go back and time everything we don't understand it explained with Gods. E.g. why does the sun move? Well it's because of the Sun God. Why is there moving water? Well it's because of the Water God. We can look back in every civilization and the farther we go back the more and more things will be attributed to spirits of mystical explanation. That supernatural has always been a default explanation when we didn't know something. You have to think why it made sense to them. As humans we do thing with intention. So supposing human like Gods, made sense because it filled the void of why things happen. Most particularly anything that moves. We could see this is strongly evident when we look back at Native American culture or other indigenous cultures who were cut off the rest of civilization.

The Greek Foundations

The Reason why Greece served as a nucleation site for knowledge is because they were in a position of Europe which put them in the middle of trading routes which connected a higher number of strongly varying cultures. We have the Silk Road coming from the Far East, we have Egypt and the Jewish, and their Famous Greek rivals the Persians. You also have to consider that Ancient Greece covered a much larger area then what Greece is now. They also covered areas such that would be part of turkey and modern day Italy and all those mini islands in between and on the northern coast of coast of the med terrain sea. The biggest advantage was the Mediterranean sea and the advance in sailing created new connections between a once isolated set of cultures, this connected them to connected them to North Africa, and Spain and what is modern Tunsia(The Carthage) and morocco.
Remember even these ships are sh!tty and they can only travel along the coasts the can't go too far in the deep sea. But it was fastest way possible to travel anywhere at the time.

This exposure to different cultures also increased the complexity of their language. A language that can better articulate subtle differences allows for more precise definition, this has large advantages in organizing complex ideas. The Europeans to the north west of Greece were not as lucky, they were not as exposed to such varying ideas, which can be considered as reasons for the lack of progress. (It is now politically incorrect to say behind, lacking progress, or undeveloped, but they are really ancient and is true with regard to philosophy, so I am sticking with it.) To the Greek they seemed to have poor articulation, they accused them of speaking (Bar-bar) that is where we get the word barbarian from. Over time the term became to have pejorative connotations. And was often used by Greeks and later Romans to refer to most other culture they considered inferior.

The Fool: okay it's going to take a few weeks, but it will be fun. Straight from the hill!
"The bud disappears when the blossom breaks through, and we might say that the former is refuted by the latter; in the same way when the fruit comes, the blossom may be explained to be a false form of the plant's existence, for the fruit appears as its true nature in place of the blossom. These stages are not merely differentiated; they supplant one another as being incompatible with one another." G. W. F. HEGEL
Stephen_Hawkins
Posts: 5,316
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4/6/2012 4:04:49 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
I have said this before, and I will say it again. It is not Aristotle who said Thales is the first philosopher, as you erroneously said in your postmodernism thread rant. It is not Plato who said Thales is the first philosopher, as you've said here. Bertrand Russell specifically said , in A History of Western Philosophy, page 25 paragraph two first sentence: Philosophy begins with Thales.
Give a man a fish, he'll eat for a day. Teach him how to be Gay, he'll positively influence the GDP.

Social Contract Theory debate: http://www.debate.org...
The_Fool_on_the_hill
Posts: 6,071
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4/6/2012 4:41:42 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/6/2012 4:04:49 PM, Stephen_Hawkins wrote:
I have said this before, and I will say it again. It is not Aristotle who said Thales is the first philosopher, as you erroneously said in your postmodernism thread rant. It is not Plato who said Thales is the first philosopher, as you've said here. Bertrand Russell specifically said , in A History of Western Philosophy, page 25 paragraph two first sentence: Philosophy begins with Thales.

http://www.debate.org...
"The bud disappears when the blossom breaks through, and we might say that the former is refuted by the latter; in the same way when the fruit comes, the blossom may be explained to be a false form of the plant's existence, for the fruit appears as its true nature in place of the blossom. These stages are not merely differentiated; they supplant one another as being incompatible with one another." G. W. F. HEGEL
Kleptin
Posts: 5,095
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4/6/2012 4:49:03 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Hey look! Fool On The Hill is teaching a course based on MY philosophies!

I'm famous!
: At 5/2/2010 2:43:54 PM, innomen wrote:
It isn't about finding a theory, philosophy or doctrine and thinking it's the answer, but a practical application of one's experiences that is the answer.

: At 10/28/2010 2:40:07 PM, jharry wrote: I have already been given the greatest Gift that anyone could ever hope for [Life], I would consider myself selfish if I expected anything more.