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Does objective morality even "exist"...

nowinterweather
Posts: 17
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5/3/2012 5:07:36 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
...and, if so, is it even important or relevant? It seems to me as if what we consider to be "objective morality" (a sense of "right" and "wrong" that is both inherent and absolute) is actually just a combination of empathy and a cost-benefit analysis on the part of the person deciding between right and wrong; a moral decision is often empathetic in that it acts in the best interest, within whatever given circumstances, of others involved or affected, and it is derived from a cost-benefit analysis of each possible option. I'd love to here thoughts on this subject (I will elaborate should the need arise).

And, obviously, this doesn't apply if you follow the teachings of a religion.
Raisor
Posts: 4,459
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5/3/2012 11:22:30 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 5/3/2012 5:07:36 PM, nowinterweather wrote:
...and, if so, is it even important or relevant? It seems to me as if what we consider to be "objective morality" (a sense of "right" and "wrong" that is both inherent and absolute) is actually just a combination of empathy and a cost-benefit analysis on the part of the person deciding between right and wrong; a moral decision is often empathetic in that it acts in the best interest, within whatever given circumstances, of others involved or affected, and it is derived from a cost-benefit analysis of each possible option. I'd love to here thoughts on this subject (I will elaborate should the need arise).

And, obviously, this doesn't apply if you follow the teachings of a religion.

Well it kind of sounds like you are describing utilitarianism, so lets run with that.

If morality is simply looking at a situation and weighing the interests of everyone involved and picking the option with the best cost-benefit option, then it is the case that morality is objective.

In any given situation there will be a solution which maximizes the interests (or utility or whatever) of the people involved. That solution is then the ethical action. The solution is objective in that anyone that found themselves in that particular situation, with all variables being equal, would be able to run the cost-benefit and come up with the optimal action. That optimal choice does not depend on the individual making the ethical decision (setting aside the individual's preferences, which are just a variable and arent problematic at the moment).

So what you have described doesnt seem to imply subjective morality, but the exact opposite.