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Critical Thinking P2

The_Fool_on_the_hill
Posts: 6,071
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7/26/2012 6:24:10 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
The Fool: The Big Popper!

"If one studies the work of say a philosopher,the first question one ask onself is : 'What problem is he trying to solve?' In my experience most students of philosophy are not taught to ask, and do not think to ask themselves, this question. Rather they ask: 'what is he trying to say?' As a result they commonly have the experience of thinking they understand what he is saying without seeing the point of why he is saying it. For by only understandin his problem-situation could the do that.
Karl Popper."
"The bud disappears when the blossom breaks through, and we might say that the former is refuted by the latter; in the same way when the fruit comes, the blossom may be explained to be a false form of the plant's existence, for the fruit appears as its true nature in place of the blossom. These stages are not merely differentiated; they supplant one another as being incompatible with one another." G. W. F. HEGEL
The_Fool_on_the_hill
Posts: 6,071
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7/26/2012 6:26:22 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
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The Fool: The Big Popper!

"If one studies the work of say a philosopher, the first question one should ask onself is : 'What problem is he trying to solve?' In my experience most students of philosophy are not taught to ask, and do not think to ask themselves, this question. Rather they ask: 'what is he trying to say?' As a result they commonly have the experience of thinking they understand what he is saying without seeing the point of why he is saying it. For by only understanding his problem-situation could they do that. Karl Popper.
"The bud disappears when the blossom breaks through, and we might say that the former is refuted by the latter; in the same way when the fruit comes, the blossom may be explained to be a false form of the plant's existence, for the fruit appears as its true nature in place of the blossom. These stages are not merely differentiated; they supplant one another as being incompatible with one another." G. W. F. HEGEL