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German philosophers

phantom
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11/12/2012 2:47:31 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Have the biggest philosophers come from Germany more than other countries? I was thinking about it. Kant, Hegel, Leibniz, Schopenhauer, Marx and Nietzsche are all very prominent. Obviously there are a lot of less none ones from around the world and probably some I should have listed. But I couldn't think of any other country that had more known philosophers than Germany. Agree/disagree?

Just some random thoughts.
"Music is a zen-like ecstatic state where you become the new man of the future, the Nietzschean merger of Apollo and Dionysus." Ray Manzarek (The Doors)
phantom
Posts: 6,774
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11/12/2012 2:52:23 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/12/2012 2:47:31 PM, phantom wrote:
Have the biggest philosophers come from Germany more than other countries? I was thinking about it. Kant, Hegel, Leibniz, Schopenhauer, Marx and Nietzsche are all very prominent. Obviously there are a lot of less known ones from around the world and probably some I should have listed. But I couldn't think of any other country that had more known philosophers than Germany. Agree/disagree?

Just some random thoughts.
"Music is a zen-like ecstatic state where you become the new man of the future, the Nietzschean merger of Apollo and Dionysus." Ray Manzarek (The Doors)
OMGJustinBieber
Posts: 3,484
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11/12/2012 4:21:11 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
The continental philosophers are often closely associated with Germany, but the UK has a really strong tradition in analytic and Enlightenment era philosophy: Hume, Sidgwick, Mill, Bentham, Anscombe, Russell, Williams, Hobbes, the list goes on.
phantom
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11/12/2012 8:44:35 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/12/2012 4:21:11 PM, OMGJustinBieber wrote:
The continental philosophers are often closely associated with Germany, but the UK has a really strong tradition in analytic and Enlightenment era philosophy: Hume, Sidgwick, Mill, Bentham, Anscombe, Russell, Williams, Hobbes, the list goes on.

That's true. But the United Kingdom isn't exactly a country (right??) so Hume being Scottish would be separate from Mill who is English.
"Music is a zen-like ecstatic state where you become the new man of the future, the Nietzschean merger of Apollo and Dionysus." Ray Manzarek (The Doors)
The_Fool_on_the_hill
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11/12/2012 8:49:01 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
The Fool: Long live the Enlightenment!
"The bud disappears when the blossom breaks through, and we might say that the former is refuted by the latter; in the same way when the fruit comes, the blossom may be explained to be a false form of the plant's existence, for the fruit appears as its true nature in place of the blossom. These stages are not merely differentiated; they supplant one another as being incompatible with one another." G. W. F. HEGEL
OMGJustinBieber
Posts: 3,484
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11/12/2012 8:53:03 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/12/2012 8:44:35 PM, phantom wrote:
At 11/12/2012 4:21:11 PM, OMGJustinBieber wrote:
The continental philosophers are often closely associated with Germany, but the UK has a really strong tradition in analytic and Enlightenment era philosophy: Hume, Sidgwick, Mill, Bentham, Anscombe, Russell, Williams, Hobbes, the list goes on.

That's true. But the United Kingdom isn't exactly a country (right??) so Hume being Scottish would be separate from Mill who is English.

Great Britain, England, whatever.
socialpinko
Posts: 10,458
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11/12/2012 10:17:18 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
A few countries stand a top as far as churning out great philosophers. Germany is obviously in high standing (Kant, Marx, Hegel) but France (Descartes, Comte, Sartre, Camus, Foucault, Lyotard) and Britain (Hume, Locke, Russell, Mill) have their fair share of greats.

More than Germany's prominence in philosophy I think is the U.S.' suckyness in this regard. Pragmatism and transcendentalism is what American seems to be best known for, which pale in comparison to European traditions. The only American philosopher I can really think of calling "great" would be Quine but to compare him to the greats described above seems a disservice to them.
: At 9/29/2014 10:55:59 AM, imabench wrote:
: : At 9/29/2014 9:43:46 AM, kbub wrote:
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: : DDO should discredit support of sexual violence at any time and in every way.
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: I disagree.
muzebreak
Posts: 2,781
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11/12/2012 10:36:50 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/12/2012 10:17:18 PM, socialpinko wrote:
A few countries stand a top as far as churning out great philosophers. Germany is obviously in high standing (Kant, Marx, Hegel) but France (Descartes, Comte, Sartre, Camus, Foucault, Lyotard) and Britain (Hume, Locke, Russell, Mill) have their fair share of greats.

More than Germany's prominence in philosophy I think is the U.S.' suckyness in this regard. Pragmatism and transcendentalism is what American seems to be best known for, which pale in comparison to European traditions. The only American philosopher I can really think of calling "great" would be Quine but to compare him to the greats described above seems a disservice to them.

That's an unfair comparison, Pinko. The U.S has been in the running for centuries less then European countries. Besides, it's unfair to hold Americans to the same intellectual standard as everyone else.
"Every kid starts out as a natural-born scientist, and then we beat it out of them. A few trickle through the system with their wonder and enthusiasm for science intact." - Carl Sagan

This is the response of the defenders of Sparta to the Commander of the Roman Army: "If you are a god, you will not hurt those who have never injured you. If you are a man, advance - you will find men equal to yourself. And women.
phantom
Posts: 6,774
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11/12/2012 10:48:00 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/12/2012 10:17:18 PM, socialpinko wrote:
A few countries stand a top as far as churning out great philosophers. Germany is obviously in high standing (Kant, Marx, Hegel) but France (Descartes, Comte, Sartre, Camus, Foucault, Lyotard) and Britain (Hume, Locke, Russell, Mill) have their fair share of greats.

More than Germany's prominence in philosophy I think is the U.S.' suckyness in this regard. Pragmatism and transcendentalism is what American seems to be best known for, which pale in comparison to European traditions. The only American philosopher I can really think of calling "great" would be Quine but to compare him to the greats described above seems a disservice to them.

I've heard a lot of good things about Quine but I agree, pragmatism, meh. America hardly stands out at all.
"Music is a zen-like ecstatic state where you become the new man of the future, the Nietzschean merger of Apollo and Dionysus." Ray Manzarek (The Doors)
socialpinko
Posts: 10,458
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11/12/2012 10:49:47 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/12/2012 10:36:50 PM, muzebreak wrote:
At 11/12/2012 10:17:18 PM, socialpinko wrote:
A few countries stand a top as far as churning out great philosophers. Germany is obviously in high standing (Kant, Marx, Hegel) but France (Descartes, Comte, Sartre, Camus, Foucault, Lyotard) and Britain (Hume, Locke, Russell, Mill) have their fair share of greats.

More than Germany's prominence in philosophy I think is the U.S.' suckyness in this regard. Pragmatism and transcendentalism is what American seems to be best known for, which pale in comparison to European traditions. The only American philosopher I can really think of calling "great" would be Quine but to compare him to the greats described above seems a disservice to them.

That's an unfair comparison, Pinko. The U.S has been in the running for centuries less then European countries. Besides, it's unfair to hold Americans to the same intellectual standard as everyone else.

I'm not saying Americans are stupid or anything (self deprecation isn't my thing), just that America hasn't produced greats like countries like Germany, France, and Britain have. I'm sure given a few hundred more years America will do the same just that they haven't done so thusfar and the philosophers churned out already are relatively shatty.
: At 9/29/2014 10:55:59 AM, imabench wrote:
: : At 9/29/2014 9:43:46 AM, kbub wrote:
: :
: : DDO should discredit support of sexual violence at any time and in every way.
:
: I disagree.
phantom
Posts: 6,774
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11/12/2012 10:50:36 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/12/2012 10:48:00 PM, phantom wrote:
At 11/12/2012 10:17:18 PM, socialpinko wrote:
A few countries stand a top as far as churning out great philosophers. Germany is obviously in high standing (Kant, Marx, Hegel) but France (Descartes, Comte, Sartre, Camus, Foucault, Lyotard) and Britain (Hume, Locke, Russell, Mill) have their fair share of greats.

More than Germany's prominence in philosophy I think is the U.S.' suckyness in this regard. Pragmatism and transcendentalism is what American seems to be best known for, which pale in comparison to European traditions. The only American philosopher I can really think of calling "great" would be Quine but to compare him to the greats described above seems a disservice to them.

I've heard a lot of good things about Quine but I agree, pragmatism, meh. America hardly stands out at all.

But hey, we do have Sam Harris right? ;)
"Music is a zen-like ecstatic state where you become the new man of the future, the Nietzschean merger of Apollo and Dionysus." Ray Manzarek (The Doors)
socialpinko
Posts: 10,458
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11/12/2012 11:14:55 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/12/2012 10:50:36 PM, phantom wrote:
At 11/12/2012 10:48:00 PM, phantom wrote:
At 11/12/2012 10:17:18 PM, socialpinko wrote:
A few countries stand a top as far as churning out great philosophers. Germany is obviously in high standing (Kant, Marx, Hegel) but France (Descartes, Comte, Sartre, Camus, Foucault, Lyotard) and Britain (Hume, Locke, Russell, Mill) have their fair share of greats.

More than Germany's prominence in philosophy I think is the U.S.' suckyness in this regard. Pragmatism and transcendentalism is what American seems to be best known for, which pale in comparison to European traditions. The only American philosopher I can really think of calling "great" would be Quine but to compare him to the greats described above seems a disservice to them.

I've heard a lot of good things about Quine but I agree, pragmatism, meh. America hardly stands out at all.

But hey, we do have Sam Harris right? ;)

Do not mention he who shall not be named!!!
: At 9/29/2014 10:55:59 AM, imabench wrote:
: : At 9/29/2014 9:43:46 AM, kbub wrote:
: :
: : DDO should discredit support of sexual violence at any time and in every way.
:
: I disagree.
muzebreak
Posts: 2,781
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11/12/2012 11:29:33 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/12/2012 10:49:47 PM, socialpinko wrote:
At 11/12/2012 10:36:50 PM, muzebreak wrote:
At 11/12/2012 10:17:18 PM, socialpinko wrote:
A few countries stand a top as far as churning out great philosophers. Germany is obviously in high standing (Kant, Marx, Hegel) but France (Descartes, Comte, Sartre, Camus, Foucault, Lyotard) and Britain (Hume, Locke, Russell, Mill) have their fair share of greats.

More than Germany's prominence in philosophy I think is the U.S.' suckyness in this regard. Pragmatism and transcendentalism is what American seems to be best known for, which pale in comparison to European traditions. The only American philosopher I can really think of calling "great" would be Quine but to compare him to the greats described above seems a disservice to them.

That's an unfair comparison, Pinko. The U.S has been in the running for centuries less then European countries. Besides, it's unfair to hold Americans to the same intellectual standard as everyone else.

I'm not saying Americans are stupid or anything (self deprecation isn't my thing),

I know, but I was. Albeit in a barely comedic manner. They are fairly stupid to a reasonable degree, or it just so happens that a lot of stupid people manage to get on T.V in America. I suspect a bit of both.

just that America hasn't produced greats like countries like Germany, France, and Britain have. I'm sure given a few hundred more years America will do the same just that they haven't done so thusfar and the philosophers churned out already are relatively shatty.

That's what I was talking about.
"Every kid starts out as a natural-born scientist, and then we beat it out of them. A few trickle through the system with their wonder and enthusiasm for science intact." - Carl Sagan

This is the response of the defenders of Sparta to the Commander of the Roman Army: "If you are a god, you will not hurt those who have never injured you. If you are a man, advance - you will find men equal to yourself. And women.
muzebreak
Posts: 2,781
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11/12/2012 11:32:25 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/12/2012 11:14:55 PM, socialpinko wrote:
At 11/12/2012 10:50:36 PM, phantom wrote:
At 11/12/2012 10:48:00 PM, phantom wrote:
At 11/12/2012 10:17:18 PM, socialpinko wrote:
A few countries stand a top as far as churning out great philosophers. Germany is obviously in high standing (Kant, Marx, Hegel) but France (Descartes, Comte, Sartre, Camus, Foucault, Lyotard) and Britain (Hume, Locke, Russell, Mill) have their fair share of greats.

More than Germany's prominence in philosophy I think is the U.S.' suckyness in this regard. Pragmatism and transcendentalism is what American seems to be best known for, which pale in comparison to European traditions. The only American philosopher I can really think of calling "great" would be Quine but to compare him to the greats described above seems a disservice to them.

I've heard a lot of good things about Quine but I agree, pragmatism, meh. America hardly stands out at all.

But hey, we do have Sam Harris right? ;)

Do not mention he who shall not be named!!!

I quite like Sam Harris. I didn't really know about him till I watched the speech he gave about bullying gay's, where a bunch of kids walked out. I'v heard some of his stuff isn't up to any decent standard, though I can't be bothered to look for it. If you want to point me to anything I'd look at it.
"Every kid starts out as a natural-born scientist, and then we beat it out of them. A few trickle through the system with their wonder and enthusiasm for science intact." - Carl Sagan

This is the response of the defenders of Sparta to the Commander of the Roman Army: "If you are a god, you will not hurt those who have never injured you. If you are a man, advance - you will find men equal to yourself. And women.
jat93
Posts: 1,440
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11/12/2012 11:44:32 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/12/2012 10:17:18 PM, socialpinko wrote:
A few countries stand a top as far as churning out great philosophers. Germany is obviously in high standing (Kant, Marx, Hegel) but France (Descartes, Comte, Sartre, Camus, Foucault, Lyotard) and Britain (Hume, Locke, Russell, Mill) have their fair share of greats.

More than Germany's prominence in philosophy I think is the U.S.' suckyness in this regard. Pragmatism and transcendentalism is what American seems to be best known for, which pale in comparison to European traditions. The only American philosopher I can really think of calling "great" would be Quine but to compare him to the greats described above seems a disservice to them.

The Founding Fathers (Jefferson and Paine in particular) seem right up your alley. The only question is if you consider them American or British. Actually, nevermind, the much deeper question is if you are defined by the culture you were born into, or if you choose the culture you go into... In some respects this is the only question worth asking: Does any individual human ultimately have free will. So for example would philosophers who moved from their native country to America and only made a name of themselves there and in response to the American culture.... Would these be considered American philosophers?
jat93
Posts: 1,440
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11/12/2012 11:51:10 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 11/12/2012 11:14:55 PM, socialpinko wrote:
At 11/12/2012 10:50:36 PM, phantom wrote:
At 11/12/2012 10:48:00 PM, phantom wrote:
At 11/12/2012 10:17:18 PM, socialpinko wrote:
A few countries stand a top as far as churning out great philosophers. Germany is obviously in high standing (Kant, Marx, Hegel) but France (Descartes, Comte, Sartre, Camus, Foucault, Lyotard) and Britain (Hume, Locke, Russell, Mill) have their fair share of greats.

More than Germany's prominence in philosophy I think is the U.S.' suckyness in this regard. Pragmatism and transcendentalism is what American seems to be best known for, which pale in comparison to European traditions. The only American philosopher I can really think of calling "great" would be Quine but to compare him to the greats described above seems a disservice to them.

I've heard a lot of good things about Quine but I agree, pragmatism, meh. America hardly stands out at all.

But hey, we do have Sam Harris right? ;)

Do not mention he who shall not be named!!!

Stop hating on Sam Harris, Spinko. He's bad if you compare every thinker to the greatest philosophers of all time. Accept Sam Harris and his ideas as they are, without obfuscations (well his ideas are worse than/less intellectually rigorous/less influential than philosophers X Y and Z...) and I really think most people would find a lot of wisdom in the questions he raises, the topics he studies and discusses. No offense meant but it really just depends on removing the haughtiness that philosophers (yes even ones who are still "children" like me and you) tend to automatically accumulate by virtue of all the awesome philosophy they've studied. Philosophy is supposed to be, ultimately, the consolation of humanity, not the consolation of the intellectuals. I think Sam Harris was so overrated by typical teenage internet atheists as a Philosopher-God figure, that it led to people like you being disillusioned with him, so you may have went from overrating him to the exact opposite. If this is indeed the process you went through, or something similar, it would seem to me that your conclusion on Sam Harris and automatic aversion to his "philosophic outlook" are fallacious.