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Everything is perception, you know

M.Torres
Posts: 3,626
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12/7/2012 1:58:23 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I would comment, but my school filters the Huffington Post. Now I'm just sitting here confused and saddened by this.
: At 11/28/2011 1:28:24 PM, BlackVoid wrote:
: M. Torres said it, so it must be right.

I'm an Apatheistic Ignostic. ... problem? ;D

I believe in the heart of the cards. .:DDO Duelist:.
drafterman
Posts: 18,870
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12/7/2012 2:18:47 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 12/7/2012 1:57:10 PM, Vi_Veri wrote:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com...

I'm posting this hear because I want to discuss this philosophicallyl.

It certainly doesn't start off on a good note:

"" Your brain is constantly renewing itself.
" Your brain can heal its wounds form the past.
" Experience changes the bran every day.
" The input you give your brain causes it to form new neural pathways.
" The more positive the input, the better your brain will function."


The first our have potential merit, but the last is just complete and utter bunk. Certainly the nature of the inputs will alter your overall perception and, hence, your actions and the "output" but there is nothing to suggest that it will affect the over all "functioning" of the brain.

The functioning of the brain is an objective assessment. Yet, you can't look at any neural pathways and determine whether or not it was the result of good input or bad input. Given the experiments done in sensory deprivation, I imagine that any input is better than no input.

The claims that this isn't "wishful thinking" is false. It is basically wishful thinking trying to disguise itself as neuroscience (I didn't see any specific studies or experiments referenced). It's essentially the same kind of nonsense you'll find in such woo as "The Secret" and is typically of output of Deepak Chopra.

I don't doubt that it is rooted in actual neuroscience, but only in the same way that woo-meisters interpret the observer effect of QM to be evidence of actual mind-over-matter and attribute some power to conscious observation in controlling the outcome of events: a misrepresentation.

I know you asked for a philosophical POV but, given it's misrepresentation of neuroscience, I felt the need to address it at that level. I'm not sure what the philosophical implications of this are.
drafterman
Posts: 18,870
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12/7/2012 2:23:24 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Now, regarding the title of the thread, I've often thought about this. Our entire worldview is, indeed, perception. It's based upon not just sensory perception in general, but our personal and unique collection of perceptions of our environment. We each perceive the world in an original way that is ours and ours alone.

Now, this isn't an argument against objective reality, but rather acknowledgement of the fact that, by virtue of me simply physically being in a different location than you, I receive different inputs than you, and even when I receive the same inputs, they are displaced (spatially and temporally). While the change is minute, it nevertheless makes my "picture" of the universe different than anyone else's, even if I can't perceive that difference.
1Devilsadvocate
Posts: 1,518
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12/9/2012 12:40:08 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 12/7/2012 1:58:23 PM, M.Torres wrote:
I would comment, but my school filters the Huffington Post. Now I'm just sitting here confused and saddened by this.

I know the feeling. Probably too late, but it can't hurt. Some one should have done this earlier.

How to Inspire Your Brain
Posted: 12/03/2012 9:08 pm

By Deepak Chopra, MD, FACP and Rudolph E. Tanzi, Ph.D., Joseph P. and Rose F. Kennedy Professor of Neurology at Harvard University, and Director of the Genetics and Aging Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), co-authors of Super Brain: Unleashing the Explosive Power of Your Mind to Maximize Health, Happiness, and Spiritual Well-being (Harmony)

We've entered a golden age for brain research, but all these new findings haven't trickled down to the individual. Yet there are broad discoveries that make it possible to everyone to improve their brains. Let me state these succinctly:

" Your brain is constantly renewing itself.
" Your brain can heal its wounds form the past.
" Experience changes the bran every day.
" The input you give your brain causes it to form new neural pathways.
" The more positive the input, the better your brain will function.

In a new book, Super Brain, I and my co-author, Prof. Rudolf Tanzi of Harvard Medical School, expand upon the neuroscience behind these broad findings. The old view of the brain as fixed for life, constantly losing neurons and declining in function, has been all but abolished. The new brain is a process, not a thing, and the process heads in the direction you point it in. A Buddhist monk meditating on compassion develops the brain circuitry that brings compassion into reality. Depending on the input it receives, you can create a compassionate brain, an artistic brain, a wise brain, or any other kind.

However, as Prof. Tanzi and I see it, the agent that makes these possibilities become real is the mind. The brain doesn't create its own destiny. Genetics delivers the brain in a functioning state so that the nervous system can regulate itself and the whole body. It doesn't take your intervention to balance hormone levels, regulate heartbeat, or do a thousand other autonomic functions. But the newest part of the brain, the neocortex, is where the field of possibilities actually lies. Here is where decisions are made, where we discriminate, worship, assess, control, and evolve.

If you think of everyday experience as input for your brain, and your actions and thoughts as output, a feedback loop is formed. The old clich" about computer software -- garbage in, garbage out - applies to all feedback loops. Toxic experiences shape the brain quite differently from healthy ones. This seems like common sense, but neuroscience has joined forces with genetics to reveal that right down to the level of DNA, the feedback loop that embraces mind and body is profoundly changed by the input processed by the brain.

Our aim was to cut to the chase. If input is everything, then happiness and well-being are created by giving the brain positive input. Without realizing it, you are here to inspire your brain to be the best it can be. This is much more than positive thinking, which is often too superficial and masks underlying negativity. The input that inspires the brain includes a wide array of things. Everyone wants to experience positive feelings (love, hope, optimism, appreciation, approval) without knowing how to get them. For all the theories that proliferate about happiness, from the brain's perspective, the formula is to maximize the positive messages being received by the cortex and minimize the negative ones.

What this implies isn't a brave new world of thought control or pretending that life is rosy. Life will always present challenges, setbacks, and crises. The point is to create a matrix that will allow you to best adapt to both sides, the light and the dark, of experience. In our book, we were particularly focused on a setup that would take people into old age with a brain that remains dynamic and resilient.

Here is our recommendation, having considered the most up-to-date neuroscience.

Matrix for a Positive Lifestyle
" Have good friends.
" Don't isolate yourself.
" Sustain a lifelong companionship with a spouse or partner.
" Engage socially in worthwhile projects.
" Be close with people who have a good lifestyle - habits are contagious.
" Follow a purpose in life.
" Leave time for play and relaxation.
" Keep up satisfying sexual activity.
" Address issues around anger.
" Practice stress management.
" Deal with the reactive mind's harmful effects: When you have a negative reaction, stop, stand back, take a few deep breaths, and observe how you're feeling.

Your brain will thrive in such a matrix, even as life brings its ups and downs. But by the same token, the brain can't arrive at any of these things on its own. You are the leader of your brain. I'll expand on this theme in the next post, since the whole issue of feedback loops turns out to be vital for all kinds of brain functions, including memory and the prevention of feared disorders like Alzheimer's.

(To be continued)

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RJCalendar
11 Fans
1 hour ago (11:55 AM)
Three steps to brain inspiration: 1.Objectify your brain 2. Forget that you used your brain to objectify your brain. 3. Repeat
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computerhoncho
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4 hours ago ( 9:25 AM)
I am over 60 years old, I have had the privilege and blessing to go to music classes
in elementary school and through out my adolescent years, love playing Mozart and Bach
still at my age and as long as the good Lord continues to give me reasonable health, I
will continue to enjoy this stimulating "brain food" with my family and friends ...
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Sindhu rani
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4 hours ago ( 8:56 AM)
fantastic article!!!
www.psychtronics.com here you will find everything interesting about Psychology
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I cannot write in English, because of the treacherous spelling. When I am reading, I only hear it and am unable to remember what the written word looks like."
"Albert Einstein

http://www.twainquotes.com... , http://thewritecorner.wordpress.com... , http://www.onlinecollegecourses.com...
Oryus
Posts: 8,280
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12/9/2012 12:43:57 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 12/7/2012 2:18:47 PM, drafterman wrote:
At 12/7/2012 1:57:10 PM, Vi_Veri wrote:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com...

I'm posting this hear because I want to discuss this philosophicallyl.

It certainly doesn't start off on a good note:

"" Your brain is constantly renewing itself.
" Your brain can heal its wounds form the past.
" Experience changes the bran every day.
" The input you give your brain causes it to form new neural pathways.
" The more positive the input, the better your brain will function."


The first our have potential merit, but the last is just complete and utter bunk. Certainly the nature of the inputs will alter your overall perception and, hence, your actions and the "output" but there is nothing to suggest that it will affect the over all "functioning" of the brain.

The functioning of the brain is an objective assessment. Yet, you can't look at any neural pathways and determine whether or not it was the result of good input or bad input. Given the experiments done in sensory deprivation, I imagine that any input is better than no input.

The claims that this isn't "wishful thinking" is false. It is basically wishful thinking trying to disguise itself as neuroscience (I didn't see any specific studies or experiments referenced). It's essentially the same kind of nonsense you'll find in such woo as "The Secret" and is typically of output of Deepak Chopra.

I don't doubt that it is rooted in actual neuroscience, but only in the same way that woo-meisters interpret the observer effect of QM to be evidence of actual mind-over-matter and attribute some power to conscious observation in controlling the outcome of events: a misrepresentation.

I know you asked for a philosophical POV but, given it's misrepresentation of neuroscience, I felt the need to address it at that level. I'm not sure what the philosophical implications of this are.

Oh, drafterman. Don't act like Deepak Chopra isn't your hero and role model.
: : :Tulle: The fool, I purposely don't engage with you because you don't have proper command of the English language.
: :
: : The Fool: It's my English writing. Either way It's okay have a larger vocabulary then you, and a better grasp of language, and you're a woman.
:
: I'm just going to leave this precious struggle nugget right here.
drafterman
Posts: 18,870
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12/9/2012 9:35:14 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 12/9/2012 12:43:57 AM, Oryus wrote:
At 12/7/2012 2:18:47 PM, drafterman wrote:
At 12/7/2012 1:57:10 PM, Vi_Veri wrote:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com...

I'm posting this hear because I want to discuss this philosophicallyl.

It certainly doesn't start off on a good note:

"" Your brain is constantly renewing itself.
" Your brain can heal its wounds form the past.
" Experience changes the bran every day.
" The input you give your brain causes it to form new neural pathways.
" The more positive the input, the better your brain will function."


The first our have potential merit, but the last is just complete and utter bunk. Certainly the nature of the inputs will alter your overall perception and, hence, your actions and the "output" but there is nothing to suggest that it will affect the over all "functioning" of the brain.

The functioning of the brain is an objective assessment. Yet, you can't look at any neural pathways and determine whether or not it was the result of good input or bad input. Given the experiments done in sensory deprivation, I imagine that any input is better than no input.

The claims that this isn't "wishful thinking" is false. It is basically wishful thinking trying to disguise itself as neuroscience (I didn't see any specific studies or experiments referenced). It's essentially the same kind of nonsense you'll find in such woo as "The Secret" and is typically of output of Deepak Chopra.

I don't doubt that it is rooted in actual neuroscience, but only in the same way that woo-meisters interpret the observer effect of QM to be evidence of actual mind-over-matter and attribute some power to conscious observation in controlling the outcome of events: a misrepresentation.

I know you asked for a philosophical POV but, given it's misrepresentation of neuroscience, I felt the need to address it at that level. I'm not sure what the philosophical implications of this are.

Oh, drafterman. Don't act like Deepak Chopra isn't your hero and role model.

I've been uncovered!

*runs away sobbing*
Kinesis
Posts: 3,667
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12/9/2012 10:14:06 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
Well...you want to discuss it so I want to ask you: what do think of the article? Are his extrapolations from the neuroscience sound?

And does the fact that our brain is constantly renewing itself pose worrying questions about our identity? Am I the me that I was in the past, or do a constantly become a new person in a cycle of degeneration and replacement?
MouthWash
Posts: 2,607
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12/9/2012 8:00:48 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 12/9/2012 10:14:06 AM, Kinesis wrote:
Well...you want to discuss it so I want to ask you: what do think of the article? Are his extrapolations from the neuroscience sound?

And does the fact that our brain is constantly renewing itself pose worrying questions about our identity? Am I the me that I was in the past, or do a constantly become a new person in a cycle of degeneration and replacement?

How do you define "person?" Isn't consciousness itself a process?
"Well, that gives whole new meaning to my assassination. If I was going to die anyway, perhaps I should leave the Bolsheviks' descendants some Christmas cookies instead of breaking their dishes and vodka bottles in their sleep." -Tsar Nicholas II (YYW)