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Socrates and Civil disobedience

ReformedPhilosopher
Posts: 2
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1/16/2013 12:33:59 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Suppose 2,500 demonstrators blocked the entrance to a coal firing power plant on March 2, 2009 and caused the power plant to shut down. They were protesting the burning of coal, which is responsible for 40% of the greenhouse gases heating the planet. Their letter to the public indicated the need to "bear witness to an evil, bring it to wider attention, and push for its correction." itis suggested this is not an isolated event but historically disruptive demonstrations also have been used to support grievances against what has been perceived as institutional racism and unjust wars

How might Socrates have responded to such civil disobedience? What is your view of this sort of civil disobedience? If you are opposed to this demonstration and disruption, when, if ever, would civil disobedience be justified?
Stephen_Hawkins
Posts: 5,316
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1/16/2013 12:47:50 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I'm pretty sure this is an article somewhere in a philosophy quarterly.

Socrates would disobey if he thought disobeying was right, and obey if he thought obeying is right. So what? It's nothing new.
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drafterman
Posts: 18,870
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1/16/2013 12:51:26 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 1/16/2013 12:33:59 PM, ReformedPhilosopher wrote:
Suppose 2,500 demonstrators blocked the entrance to a coal firing power plant on March 2, 2009 and caused the power plant to shut down. They were protesting the burning of coal, which is responsible for 40% of the greenhouse gases heating the planet. Their letter to the public indicated the need to "bear witness to an evil, bring it to wider attention, and push for its correction." itis suggested this is not an isolated event but historically disruptive demonstrations also have been used to support grievances against what has been perceived as institutional racism and unjust wars

How might Socrates have responded to such civil disobedience?

I don't think Socrates would have been pro-civil disobedience.

What is your view of this sort of civil disobedience? If you are opposed to this demonstration and disruption, when, if ever, would civil disobedience be justified?
Noumena
Posts: 6,047
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1/16/2013 1:00:10 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 1/16/2013 12:33:59 PM, ReformedPhilosopher wrote:

How might Socrates have responded to such civil disobedience? What is your view of this sort of civil disobedience? If you are opposed to this demonstration and disruption, when, if ever, would civil disobedience be justified?

Socrates let himself be put to death out of respect for the State so I doubt he thought too highly of the concept of civil disobedience.

On my personal opinion, I simply take certain actions to be themselves unjustified. Whether it's the State or a person on the street performing them, one has a right to resist. Ex. theft, murder, rape, etc. Moral universalism sort of entails it.
: At 5/13/2014 7:05:20 PM, Crescendo wrote:
: The difference is that the gay movement is currently pushing their will on Churches, as shown in the link to gay marriage in Denmark. Meanwhile, the Inquisition ended several centuries ago.
vbaculum
Posts: 1,274
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1/16/2013 1:50:34 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 1/16/2013 12:33:59 PM, ReformedPhilosopher wrote:
Suppose 2,500 demonstrators blocked the entrance to a coal firing power plant on March 2, 2009 and caused the power plant to shut down. They were protesting the burning of coal, which is responsible for 40% of the greenhouse gases heating the planet. Their letter to the public indicated the need to "bear witness to an evil, bring it to wider attention, and push for its correction." itis suggested this is not an isolated event but historically disruptive demonstrations also have been used to support grievances against what has been perceived as institutional racism and unjust wars

How might Socrates have responded to such civil disobedience?

He would have mingled with the demonstrators and asked them to justify their actions. Then he would have found contridictions in whatever they said.

What is your view of this sort of civil disobedience? If you are opposed to this demonstration and disruption, when, if ever, would civil disobedience be justified?
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

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