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Plato's Allegory of the cave

ReformedPhilosopher
Posts: 2
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1/16/2013 11:26:30 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
In plato's mind of the allegory of the cave to climb up from the cave was to climb up from ignorance into the light of knowledge is there other ways to interpret the parable? does group think apply to the prisoners in the cave? how about social myths are thereany we hold to similar to the prisoners?
MouthWash
Posts: 2,607
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1/16/2013 11:28:43 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Whaaaaaaat?
"Well, that gives whole new meaning to my assassination. If I was going to die anyway, perhaps I should leave the Bolsheviks' descendants some Christmas cookies instead of breaking their dishes and vodka bottles in their sleep." -Tsar Nicholas II (YYW)
Noumena
Posts: 6,047
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1/16/2013 11:39:22 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 1/16/2013 11:26:30 PM, ReformedPhilosopher wrote:
In plato's mind of the allegory of the cave to climb up from the cave was to climb up from ignorance into the light of knowledge is there other ways to interpret the parable? does group think apply to the prisoners in the cave? how about social myths are thereany we hold to similar to the prisoners?

I think what you mean to say (your writing is hard to understand) is that the allegory of the cave doesn't just have a metaphysical interpretation, but a social one as well. Plato, on this interpretation, is critiquing the often unexplored assumptions we operate off of everyday. Sort of like people who've never looked away from a wall and thus think anyone else must be crazy when they don't fit into their limited world view. Meh, I think it's a good analogy. There are plenty of social myths (and even truths) that people just accept either out of intellectual laziness or from being afraid to challenge the status quo. The left-right paradigm (or political quietism as Lenin might call it) and organized religion to me seem the biggest examples of this.

I do think it's funny though, interpreting Plato to be a supporter of free thinking since in the Republic he envisioned a totalitarian society where even art is banned. But the point, I think, still remains valid.
: At 5/13/2014 7:05:20 PM, Crescendo wrote:
: The difference is that the gay movement is currently pushing their will on Churches, as shown in the link to gay marriage in Denmark. Meanwhile, the Inquisition ended several centuries ago.