Total Posts:7|Showing Posts:1-7
Jump to topic:

Crying

ConservativePolitico
Posts: 8,278
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
4/29/2013 9:13:39 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
I find it interesting that humans have developed crying as an emotional release. By a purely biological sense, watering eyes, wailing and the heaving of the body should have no positive effect on people at all. Yet somehow this action releases pent up emotions leading to an overall positive effect in the long run.

Is this something purely biological? Or is there something deeper behind it?

I just find the action interesting. That sadness creates such a strong biological response that seems to make little sense if you think about it.
The wise have eyes in their heads, while the fool walks in the darkness; but I came to realizethat the same fate overtakes them both.
Then I said to myself,
"The fate of the fool will overtake me also.
What then do I gain by being wise?"
I said to myself, "This too is meaningless."
For the wise, like the fool, will not be long remembered;
the days have already come when both have been forgotten.
Like the fool, the wise too must die!
- Ecclesiastes 2:14-16
mattrodstrom
Posts: 12,028
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
4/29/2013 10:31:40 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/29/2013 9:13:39 AM, ConservativePolitico wrote:
I find it interesting that humans have developed crying as an emotional release. By a purely biological sense, watering eyes, wailing and the heaving of the body should have no positive effect on people at all. Yet somehow this action releases pent up emotions leading to an overall positive effect in the long run.

Is this something purely biological? Or is there something deeper behind it?

Deeper like? o.O

And, no... There's nothing deeper to you're response than that it's a biological response b/c you happen to be a biological being.
"He who does not know how to put his will into things at least puts a meaning into them: that is, he believes there is a will in them already."

Metaphysics:
"The science.. which deals with the fundamental errors of mankind - but as if they were the fundamental truths."
vbaculum
Posts: 1,274
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
4/29/2013 11:52:27 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/29/2013 9:13:39 AM, ConservativePolitico wrote:
I find it interesting that humans have developed crying as an emotional release. By a purely biological sense, watering eyes, wailing and the heaving of the body should have no positive effect on people at all. Yet somehow this action releases pent up emotions leading to an overall positive effect in the long run.

Is this something purely biological? Or is there something deeper behind it?

I just find the action interesting. That sadness creates such a strong biological response that seems to make little sense if you think about it.

It's intended to signal to your fellow apes authentic stress and anguish. That's the adaptive benefit. The feeling of release is probably more complicated to explain since it's neuro/biochemestry but the end result the important thing, which is that or species realizes that there is sometimes a need to cry, i.e., signal to our fellows that we've succumbed to overwhelming stress.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it
ConservativePolitico
Posts: 8,278
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
4/29/2013 12:01:33 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/29/2013 11:52:27 AM, vbaculum wrote:
At 4/29/2013 9:13:39 AM, ConservativePolitico wrote:
I find it interesting that humans have developed crying as an emotional release. By a purely biological sense, watering eyes, wailing and the heaving of the body should have no positive effect on people at all. Yet somehow this action releases pent up emotions leading to an overall positive effect in the long run.

Is this something purely biological? Or is there something deeper behind it?

I just find the action interesting. That sadness creates such a strong biological response that seems to make little sense if you think about it.

It's intended to signal to your fellow apes authentic stress and anguish. That's the adaptive benefit. The feeling of release is probably more complicated to explain since it's neuro/biochemestry but the end result the important thing, which is that or species realizes that there is sometimes a need to cry, i.e., signal to our fellows that we've succumbed to overwhelming stress.

That would make sense, it's a signal in order to garner support and care to ease your stress. Never thought of it that way before. Clever.
The wise have eyes in their heads, while the fool walks in the darkness; but I came to realizethat the same fate overtakes them both.
Then I said to myself,
"The fate of the fool will overtake me also.
What then do I gain by being wise?"
I said to myself, "This too is meaningless."
For the wise, like the fool, will not be long remembered;
the days have already come when both have been forgotten.
Like the fool, the wise too must die!
- Ecclesiastes 2:14-16
pozessed
Posts: 1,034
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
4/30/2013 1:20:31 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/29/2013 11:52:27 AM, vbaculum wrote:
At 4/29/2013 9:13:39 AM, ConservativePolitico wrote:
I find it interesting that humans have developed crying as an emotional release. By a purely biological sense, watering eyes, wailing and the heaving of the body should have no positive effect on people at all. Yet somehow this action releases pent up emotions leading to an overall positive effect in the long run.

Is this something purely biological? Or is there something deeper behind it?

I just find the action interesting. That sadness creates such a strong biological response that seems to make little sense if you think about it.

It's intended to signal to your fellow apes authentic stress and anguish. That's the adaptive benefit. The feeling of release is probably more complicated to explain since it's neuro/biochemestry but the end result the important thing, which is that or species realizes that there is sometimes a need to cry, i.e., signal to our fellows that we've succumbed to overwhelming stress.

Then why do some grieve alone and still feel relieved?
vbaculum
Posts: 1,274
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
4/30/2013 1:48:08 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 4/30/2013 1:20:31 PM, pozessed wrote:
At 4/29/2013 11:52:27 AM, vbaculum wrote:
At 4/29/2013 9:13:39 AM, ConservativePolitico wrote:
I find it interesting that humans have developed crying as an emotional release. By a purely biological sense, watering eyes, wailing and the heaving of the body should have no positive effect on people at all. Yet somehow this action releases pent up emotions leading to an overall positive effect in the long run.

Is this something purely biological? Or is there something deeper behind it?

I just find the action interesting. That sadness creates such a strong biological response that seems to make little sense if you think about it.

It's intended to signal to your fellow apes authentic stress and anguish. That's the adaptive benefit. The feeling of release is probably more complicated to explain since it's neuro/biochemestry but the end result the important thing, which is that or species realizes that there is sometimes a need to cry, i.e., signal to our fellows that we've succumbed to overwhelming stress.

Then why do some grieve alone and still feel relieved?

The same reason people masturbate alone and feel relieved :)

Natural selection is an imperfect engineer. The neuro/biochemestry governing crying is present whether or not we are around others; the need to cry is still there. However, the reason we evolved to cry is best described in social terms.
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it