Total Posts:2|Showing Posts:1-2
Jump to topic:

Critique My Made-Up Philosophy (Theists Only)

Talib.ul-Ilm
Posts: 203
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
5/24/2013 12:05:56 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
I thought it would be interesting to see what people had to say about this philosophy that I pretty much made up, building upon various Pantheistic and Panentheistic philosophies of the past. Let me know what you think.

In the beginning there was the One, pure intellect, transcendent and immaterial. The One is a powerhouse of infinite production. The One is the first and the last. The One is not self-aware.

Out of necessity, the One overflowed from itself, creating the universe.

Both the creation and the creator are divine, and one, interconnected. Together they are God, who is eternal, all-powerful, and all-knowing.

Every individual phenomena within the creation is a divine aspect of god. The animate and the inanimate are both divine aspects of god, but with different natures, one is living, the other is non-living.

The highest ranking divine aspect of god is sentient life. Resulting from their sentience, is the ability to unite their minds with the One, which is the greatest goal of life.

Self-preservation is in our nature. Respecting ourselves is in our nature. Wanting to better ourselves is in our nature. That which we perceive as divine is naturally looked upon with deep reverence, holiness and the like.

In this philosophy, the "Self" is all that is, god. All that exists is also held to be divine.

Therefore the individual is naturally inclined to preserve all that is, respect all that is, and try to better all that is. As well as give deep reverence for all that is, considering it to be divine, holy, and the like.

The individual practitioner has various practices that allow themselves to unite their minds with the One, such as Samadhi, Dikhr, Contemplation on the One, and much more.

Where did I go wrong? Where can I improve? Where can I elaborate?

Philosophies I Drew Upon: Platonism, Neoplatonism, Gnosticism, Sufism, Vedanta, Buddhism, Daoism and more.
tBoonePickens
Posts: 3,266
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
5/24/2013 10:18:40 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/24/2013 12:05:56 AM, Talib.ul-Ilm wrote:
I thought it would be interesting to see what people had to say about this philosophy that I pretty much made up, building upon various Pantheistic and Panentheistic philosophies of the past. Let me know what you think.
Ok.

(A) In the beginning there was the One, pure intellect, transcendent and immaterial. The One is a powerhouse of infinite production. The One is the first and the last. The One is not self-aware.
A1) Not much in the way of intellect if it is not self-aware.
A2) You say it is immaterial and that it is a powerhouse of infinite production; however, I can only deduce that this means an infinite producer of immaterial things.

(B) Out of necessity, the One overflowed from itself, creating the universe.
B1) You have not explained the necessity.
B2) Here too, one can only conclude that an immaterial universe has been created because there is no line of reasoning that get's us from immaterial to material.
B3) Another issue is that you keep ascribing "material properties" to immaterial things. I think that at this point you need to define the two concepts clearly and concisely.

Both the creation and the creator are divine, and one, interconnected. Together they are God, who is eternal, all-powerful, and all-knowing.
Perhaps, but we are still at an immaterial phase: we have an immaterial creation and an immaterial creator.

Every individual phenomena within the creation is a divine aspect of god. The animate and the inanimate are both divine aspects of god, but with different natures, one is living, the other is non-living.
Here again you vacillate between material & immaterial.

The highest ranking divine aspect of god is sentient life. Resulting from their sentience, is the ability to unite their minds with the One, which is the greatest goal of life.

Self-preservation is in our nature. Respecting ourselves is in our nature. Wanting to better ourselves is in our nature. That which we perceive as divine is naturally looked upon with deep reverence, holiness and the like.

In this philosophy, the "Self" is all that is, god. All that exists is also held to be divine.

Therefore the individual is naturally inclined to preserve all that is, respect all that is, and try to better all that is. As well as give deep reverence for all that is, considering it to be divine, holy, and the like.

The individual practitioner has various practices that allow themselves to unite their minds with the One, such as Samadhi, Dikhr, Contemplation on the One, and much more.
I cannot comment further because after (B) nothing follows.

Where did I go wrong? Where can I improve? Where can I elaborate?
See above.
WOS
: At 10/3/2012 4:28:52 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
: Without nothing existing, you couldn't have something.