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Moral decisions shown in Les Mis

ClassicRobert
Posts: 2,487
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7/2/2013 12:30:56 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
I just watched Les Miserables for the third time, but this was the first time I really noticed some of the moral decisions and implications shown in the play. Some examples.

Is a man justified in breaking the law to feed his family?

Is a person morally obliged to right the wrongs of the past?

This one might need a little more background. In the play, JVJ skips parole and ends up becoming a mayor under a new identity. Some years later, another man is falsely arrested for being JVJ. JVJ first raises the issue "If I speak, I am condemned. If I don't, then I am damned." However, he then considers whether or not it would be right to speak up, because he currently employs hundreds of people. So in this situation, should he speak up and condemn himself and the hundreds of people under his employment, or throw a man under the bus and not be able to live with himself?

What are some of your thoughts?
Debate me: Economic decision theory should be adjusted to include higher-order preferences for non-normative purposes http://www.debate.org...

Do you really believe that? Or not? If you believe it, you should man up and defend it in a debate. -RoyLatham

My Pet Fish is such a Douche- NiamC

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YYW
Posts: 36,286
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7/2/2013 12:33:43 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/2/2013 12:30:56 AM, ClassicRobert wrote:
I just watched Les Miserables for the third time, but this was the first time I really noticed some of the moral decisions and implications shown in the play. Some examples.

Is a man justified in breaking the law to feed his family?

Jean Valjean might think so.

Is a person morally obliged to right the wrongs of the past?

Even if they were committed for good reasons (or at least excusable by circumstances), I would think so.

---

If I think of it tomorrow I'll post a more substantive analysis of this... but for now I'm tired.
Tsar of DDO
ClassicRobert
Posts: 2,487
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7/3/2013 12:34:15 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/2/2013 12:30:56 AM, ClassicRobert wrote:
I just watched Les Miserables for the third time, but this was the first time I really noticed some of the moral decisions and implications shown in the play. Some examples.

Is a man justified in breaking the law to feed his family?

Is a person morally obliged to right the wrongs of the past?

This one might need a little more background. In the play, JVJ skips parole and ends up becoming a mayor under a new identity. Some years later, another man is falsely arrested for being JVJ. JVJ first raises the issue "If I speak, I am condemned. If I don't, then I am damned." However, he then considers whether or not it would be right to speak up, because he currently employs hundreds of people. So in this situation, should he speak up and condemn himself and the hundreds of people under his employment, or throw a man under the bus and not be able to live with himself?

What are some of your thoughts?

I think a better alternative to the first question would be "Should a man be punished for breaking the law to feed his family?"
Debate me: Economic decision theory should be adjusted to include higher-order preferences for non-normative purposes http://www.debate.org...

Do you really believe that? Or not? If you believe it, you should man up and defend it in a debate. -RoyLatham

My Pet Fish is such a Douche- NiamC

It's an app to meet friends and stuff, sort of like an adult club penguin- Thett3, describing Tinder
Noumena
Posts: 6,047
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7/3/2013 1:02:15 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
I saw Les Mis when it was in theaters. I would have cried if I didn't want to look like a biznatch in front of the guy I was with lol. Seriously how does one not ball?

The moral choices faced throughout the film were vexing (and probably unanswerable to a degree). On the question of stealing to feed ones family, it just seems like a problem of who's interests are stronger or who's are more identifiable with. Not many would identify with a shop owner *over* a family in poverty even though one would identify with the shop owner generally. I think the point is that things like property/law/etc. aren't absolute and that social institutions should be geared towards the fulfillment of human interests (with an obvious emphasis on moral weighting as opposed to fully equal applicability) as opposed to hallow principles or tradition/custom.
: At 5/13/2014 7:05:20 PM, Crescendo wrote:
: The difference is that the gay movement is currently pushing their will on Churches, as shown in the link to gay marriage in Denmark. Meanwhile, the Inquisition ended several centuries ago.
YYW
Posts: 36,286
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7/3/2013 1:09:20 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 7/3/2013 1:02:15 AM, Noumena wrote:
I saw Les Mis when it was in theaters. I would have cried if I didn't want to look like a biznatch in front of the guy I was with lol. Seriously how does one not ball?

It is kind of a tear jerker...
Tsar of DDO