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JOHN RAWLS: Philosopher Par Excellence

RonPrice
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9/23/2013 5:15:35 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
JOHN RAWLS
Freedom, equality and justice

Part 1:

John Bordley Rawls(1921-2002) was an American philosopher and a leading figure in moral and political philosophy. He held the James Bryant Conant Professorship at Harvard University, and the Fulbright Fellowship at Christ Church, Oxford. I did not come across Rawls and his writings until I taught philosophy in the 1990s at what is now a polytechnic in Perth Western Australia.

His magnum opus, A Theory of Justice (1971), was hailed at the time of its publication as "the most important work in moral philosophy since the end of World War II," and is now regarded as "one of the primary texts in political philosophy." In 1971 I had just arrived in Australia at the age of 26, and was at the beginning of my teaching career in secondary schools and post-secondary colleges and universities. I did not teach any philosophy until later in the "70s, and I did not seriously get into Rawls" writings until I retired from paid employment, and from my extensive community responsibilities in the Baha"i community.

Part 2:

In 1962, Rawls became a full professor of philosophy at Cornell, and soon achieved a tenured position at MIT. That same year, he moved to Harvard University, where he taught for almost forty years, and where he trained some of the leading contemporary figures in moral and political philosophy, including Thomas Nagel, among others.1

During those 40 years, from 1962 to 2002, I completed five years of post-secondary studies and training, as well as a 32 year teaching career; I married twice, raised three children, travelled-pioneered to many towns and cities for the Canadian and Australian Baha"i communities. I also retired during the last of those 40 years, and gradually reinvented myself as a writer and author, poet and publisher Rawls died at the age of 81 just as a retired from all my PT work.

Part 3:

Rawls seldom gave interviews and, having both a stutter and a "bat-like horror of the limelight", he did not become a public intellectual despite his fame. He instead remained committed mainly to his academic and family life. On his religious views, Rawls was an atheist. I have given over two dozen interviews, spent decades in the limelight in varying degrees. I am a theist, a Baha"i. Since my retirement, life on an old-age pension, and new meds for my bipolar 1 disorder in and after 2009, I have become more solitary, more reclusive, and more involved in literary-intellectual activities, the life of the mind.-Ron Price with thanks to 1Wikipedia, 23/9/"13.

As I was heading into retirement
in the 1990s, you had a series of
strokes and, by 2002".you were
gone. Your intellectual years had
an immense fertility, an erudition,
and a prolificacy far above all my
mediocre earthly achievements in
education and teaching. Capacities
of some lie in a thimble"...and of
others it is a gallon measure.1".To
each their own as we travel the road,
and slowly discover those talents and
faculties with which we are endowed
at the different stages in the lifespan
from toddlerhood to late adulthood,
from 60 to 80, and into to old-age, the
years after 80, if we last that long. May
I, too, last as long as you did Dr Rawls.

1 Rawls's tried to demonstrate that the authentically valuable features of the common notions of freedom and equality could be integrated into a seamless unity which he called justice. By elucidating the proper perspective we should take when thinking about justice, Rawls hoped to demonstrate the apparent conflict between these two values, freedom and equality, to be illusory.

2 Baha"u"llah wrote that "the portion of some might lie in the palm of a man"s hand, the portion of others might fill a cup, and of others even a gallon-measure." There is much in the corpus of the Baha"i teachings on freedom, equality and justice.

Ron Price
23/9/"13.
Married for 48 years, a teacher for 32, a student for 18, a writer and editor for 16, and a Baha'i for 56(in 2015)
RonPrice
Posts: 32
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9/26/2013 12:40:21 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/23/2013 5:15:35 AM, RonPrice wrote:
JOHN RAWLS
Freedom, equality and justice

Part 1:

John Bordley Rawls(1921-2002) was an American philosopher and a leading figure in moral and political philosophy. He held the James Bryant Conant Professorship at Harvard University, and the Fulbright Fellowship at Christ Church, Oxford. I did not come across Rawls and his writings until I taught philosophy in the 1990s at what is now a polytechnic in Perth Western Australia.

His magnum opus, A Theory of Justice (1971), was hailed at the time of its publication as "the most important work in moral philosophy since the end of World War II," and is now regarded as "one of the primary texts in political philosophy." In 1971 I had just arrived in Australia at the age of 26, and was at the beginning of my teaching career in secondary schools and post-secondary colleges and universities. I did not teach any philosophy until later in the "70s, and I did not seriously get into Rawls" writings until I retired from paid employment, and from my extensive community responsibilities in the Baha"i community.

Part 2:

In 1962, Rawls became a full professor of philosophy at Cornell, and soon achieved a tenured position at MIT. That same year, he moved to Harvard University, where he taught for almost forty years, and where he trained some of the leading contemporary figures in moral and political philosophy, including Thomas Nagel, among others.1

During those 40 years, from 1962 to 2002, I completed five years of post-secondary studies and training, as well as a 32 year teaching career; I married twice, raised three children, travelled-pioneered to many towns and cities for the Canadian and Australian Baha"i communities. I also retired during the last of those 40 years, and gradually reinvented myself as a writer and author, poet and publisher Rawls died at the age of 81 just as a retired from all my PT work.

Part 3:

Rawls seldom gave interviews and, having both a stutter and a "bat-like horror of the limelight", he did not become a public intellectual despite his fame. He instead remained committed mainly to his academic and family life. On his religious views, Rawls was an atheist. I have given over two dozen interviews, spent decades in the limelight in varying degrees. I am a theist, a Baha"i. Since my retirement, life on an old-age pension, and new meds for my bipolar 1 disorder in and after 2009, I have become more solitary, more reclusive, and more involved in literary-intellectual activities, the life of the mind.-Ron Price with thanks to 1Wikipedia, 23/9/"13.

As I was heading into retirement
in the 1990s, you had a series of
strokes and, by 2002".you were
gone. Your intellectual years had
an immense fertility, an erudition,
and a prolificacy far above all my
mediocre earthly achievements in
education and teaching. Capacities
of some lie in a thimble"...and of
others it is a gallon measure.1".To
each their own as we travel the road,
and slowly discover those talents and
faculties with which we are endowed
at the different stages in the lifespan
from toddlerhood to late adulthood,
from 60 to 80, and into to old-age, the
years after 80, if we last that long. May
I, too, last as long as you did Dr Rawls.

1 Rawls's tried to demonstrate that the authentically valuable features of the common notions of freedom and equality could be integrated into a seamless unity which he called justice. By elucidating the proper perspective we should take when thinking about justice, Rawls hoped to demonstrate the apparent conflict between these two values, freedom and equality, to be illusory.

2 Baha"u"llah wrote that "the portion of some might lie in the palm of a man"s hand, the portion of others might fill a cup, and of others even a gallon-measure." There is much in the corpus of the Baha"i teachings on freedom, equality and justice.

Ron Price
23/9/"13.
------------------------------
For those who come to the above post, I look forward to hearing from you, if you would like to comment, if you have an interest in the subject matter of my post. Otherwise, I trust you enjoy the read and, if it is not on your agenda of interest, "no worries" as they say Downunder.-Ron
Married for 48 years, a teacher for 32, a student for 18, a writer and editor for 16, and a Baha'i for 56(in 2015)
The_Fool_on_the_hill
Posts: 6,071
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9/26/2013 7:03:23 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 9/26/2013 12:40:21 AM, RonPrice wrote:
At 9/23/2013 5:15:35 AM, RonPrice wrote:
JOHN RAWLS
Freedom, equality and justice

Part 1:

John Bordley Rawls(1921-2002) was an American philosopher and a leading figure in moral and political philosophy. He held the James Bryant Conant Professorship at Harvard University, and the Fulbright Fellowship at Christ Church, Oxford. I did not come across Rawls and his writings until I taught philosophy in the 1990s at what is now a polytechnic in Perth Western Australia.

His magnum opus, A Theory of Justice (1971), was hailed at the time of its publication as "the most important work in moral philosophy since the end of World War II," and is now regarded as "one of the primary texts in political philosophy." In 1971 I had just arrived in Australia at the age of 26, and was at the beginning of my teaching career in secondary schools and post-secondary colleges and universities. I did not teach any philosophy until later in the "70s, and I did not seriously get into Rawls" writings until I retired from paid employment, and from my extensive community responsibilities in the Baha"i community.

Part 2:

In 1962, Rawls became a full professor of philosophy at Cornell, and soon achieved a tenured position at MIT. That same year, he moved to Harvard University, where he taught for almost forty years, and where he trained some of the leading contemporary figures in moral and political philosophy, including Thomas Nagel, among others.1

During those 40 years, from 1962 to 2002, I completed five years of post-secondary studies and training, as well as a 32 year teaching career; I married twice, raised three children, travelled-pioneered to many towns and cities for the Canadian and Australian Baha"i communities. I also retired during the last of those 40 years, and gradually reinvented myself as a writer and author, poet and publisher Rawls died at the age of 81 just as a retired from all my PT work.

Part 3:

Rawls seldom gave interviews and, having both a stutter and a "bat-like horror of the limelight", he did not become a public intellectual despite his fame. He instead remained committed mainly to his academic and family life. On his religious views, Rawls was an atheist. I have given over two dozen interviews, spent decades in the limelight in varying degrees. I am a theist, a Baha"i. Since my retirement, life on an old-age pension, and new meds for my bipolar 1 disorder in and after 2009, I have become more solitary, more reclusive, and more involved in literary-intellectual activities, the life of the mind.-Ron Price with thanks to 1Wikipedia, 23/9/"13.

As I was heading into retirement
in the 1990s, you had a series of
strokes and, by 2002".you were
gone. Your intellectual years had
an immense fertility, an erudition,
and a prolificacy far above all my
mediocre earthly achievements in
education and teaching. Capacities
of some lie in a thimble"...and of
others it is a gallon measure.1".To
each their own as we travel the road,
and slowly discover those talents and
faculties with which we are endowed
at the different stages in the lifespan
from toddlerhood to late adulthood,
from 60 to 80, and into to old-age, the
years after 80, if we last that long. May
I, too, last as long as you did Dr Rawls.

1 Rawls's tried to demonstrate that the authentically valuable features of the common notions of freedom and equality could be integrated into a seamless unity which he called justice. By elucidating the proper perspective we should take when thinking about justice, Rawls hoped to demonstrate the apparent conflict between these two values, freedom and equality, to be illusory.

2 Baha"u"llah wrote that "the portion of some might lie in the palm of a man"s hand, the portion of others might fill a cup, and of others even a gallon-measure." There is much in the corpus of the Baha"i teachings on freedom, equality and justice.

Ron Price
23/9/"13.
------------------------------
For those who come to the above post, I look forward to hearing from you, if you would like to comment, if you have an interest in the subject matter of my post. Otherwise, I trust you enjoy the read and, if it is not on your agenda of interest, "no worries" as they say Downunder.-Ron

The Fool: I'm sure this is an oversimplification, just a tad. lol

But he pretty much says, what would choose if we were ignorant..?

Answer: Well,, we would be ignorant.. behind the veil of ignorance..no?

Everything looks the same, when you're ignorant of the differences and so everything would look equal. As it would just be one indefiniteness. .

For absence and ignorance are the same observation.
And Information, is differences. In-form. as oppose to Form.

What is freedom but an ignorance of constraint.
in fact, try to give an example of freedom, which is not the lack of something.'

Now I make it look a little more ridiculous, then it is but, let's discuss what you actually know about it, more than that.
"The bud disappears when the blossom breaks through, and we might say that the former is refuted by the latter; in the same way when the fruit comes, the blossom may be explained to be a false form of the plant's existence, for the fruit appears as its true nature in place of the blossom. These stages are not merely differentiated; they supplant one another as being incompatible with one another." G. W. F. HEGEL