Total Posts:9|Showing Posts:1-9
Jump to topic:

Ad hominem vs. scientific study

themohawkninja
Posts: 816
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/21/2013 11:22:58 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
When we look at the logical fallacy of ad hominem, we find that the basis for the cause of it being a fallacy, is that the person committing the fallacy is taking one or a few events from their personal experience, and extrapolating it to make a point (I've seen people from the A community do B, so therefore all members of A do B).

When we look at a scientific study, we are looking at at least 30 people stating their experiences.

Therefore, would an ad hominem fallacy containing at least 30 people of a given demographic work just as well as a scientific study of the same experience? Especially when considering the fact that a scientific study involves different people with different ways of interpreting the behavior in question, whereas the person committing the ad hominem is one person, which would give a consistent interpretation of the behavior.

If not, than where does an ad hominem of 30 or more people fail, where the equivalent scientific study doesn't?
"Morals are simply a limit to man's potential."~Myself

Political correctness is like saying you can't have a steak, because a baby can't eat one ~Unknown
Rational_Thinker9119
Posts: 9,054
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/21/2013 12:24:31 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 10/21/2013 11:22:58 AM, themohawkninja wrote:
When we look at the logical fallacy of ad hominem, we find that the basis for the cause of it being a fallacy, is that the person committing the fallacy is taking one or a few events from their personal experience, and extrapolating it to make a point (I've seen people from the A community do B, so therefore all members of A do B).

When we look at a scientific study, we are looking at at least 30 people stating their experiences.

Therefore, would an ad hominem fallacy containing at least 30 people of a given demographic work just as well as a scientific study of the same experience? Especially when considering the fact that a scientific study involves different people with different ways of interpreting the behavior in question, whereas the person committing the ad hominem is one person, which would give a consistent interpretation of the behavior.

If not, than where does an ad hominem of 30 or more people fail, where the equivalent scientific study doesn't?

The Ad Hominem fallacy would be to attack the person, and then claim that their position is wrong because of it. Something like:

"You're argument is wrong. You are just a rapper, what do you know about philosophy?"

In a scientific study, you have a bunch of people adhering to the the scientific method which has an objective basis.

The two are not equivalents.
themohawkninja
Posts: 816
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/21/2013 2:29:20 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I am really getting my fallacies mixed up. Isn't there a fallacy to do with citing your own experience, and then extrapolating it onto the general population?
"Morals are simply a limit to man's potential."~Myself

Political correctness is like saying you can't have a steak, because a baby can't eat one ~Unknown
ClassicRobert
Posts: 2,487
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/21/2013 3:04:34 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 10/21/2013 2:29:20 PM, themohawkninja wrote:
I am really getting my fallacies mixed up. Isn't there a fallacy to do with citing your own experience, and then extrapolating it onto the general population?

Anecdotal evidence
Debate me: Economic decision theory should be adjusted to include higher-order preferences for non-normative purposes http://www.debate.org...

Do you really believe that? Or not? If you believe it, you should man up and defend it in a debate. -RoyLatham

My Pet Fish is such a Douche- NiamC

It's an app to meet friends and stuff, sort of like an adult club penguin- Thett3, describing Tinder
ClassicRobert
Posts: 2,487
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/21/2013 3:05:10 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 10/21/2013 11:22:58 AM, themohawkninja wrote:
When we look at the logical fallacy of ad hominem, we find that the basis for the cause of it being a fallacy, is that the person committing the fallacy is taking one or a few events from their personal experience, and extrapolating it to make a point (I've seen people from the A community do B, so therefore all members of A do B).

When we look at a scientific study, we are looking at at least 30 people stating their experiences.

Therefore, would an ad hominem fallacy containing at least 30 people of a given demographic work just as well as a scientific study of the same experience? Especially when considering the fact that a scientific study involves different people with different ways of interpreting the behavior in question, whereas the person committing the ad hominem is one person, which would give a consistent interpretation of the behavior.

If not, than where does an ad hominem of 30 or more people fail, where the equivalent scientific study doesn't?

Are you asking if attacking a study's credibility is an ad hom?
Debate me: Economic decision theory should be adjusted to include higher-order preferences for non-normative purposes http://www.debate.org...

Do you really believe that? Or not? If you believe it, you should man up and defend it in a debate. -RoyLatham

My Pet Fish is such a Douche- NiamC

It's an app to meet friends and stuff, sort of like an adult club penguin- Thett3, describing Tinder
themohawkninja
Posts: 816
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/21/2013 3:07:18 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 10/21/2013 3:04:34 PM, ClassicRobert wrote:
At 10/21/2013 2:29:20 PM, themohawkninja wrote:
I am really getting my fallacies mixed up. Isn't there a fallacy to do with citing your own experience, and then extrapolating it onto the general population?

Anecdotal evidence

Yeah, that. I thought there was a name for it that had the word fallacy in their, but anecdotes is what I mean.
"Morals are simply a limit to man's potential."~Myself

Political correctness is like saying you can't have a steak, because a baby can't eat one ~Unknown
themohawkninja
Posts: 816
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/21/2013 3:08:02 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 10/21/2013 3:05:10 PM, ClassicRobert wrote:
At 10/21/2013 11:22:58 AM, themohawkninja wrote:
When we look at the logical fallacy of ad hominem, we find that the basis for the cause of it being a fallacy, is that the person committing the fallacy is taking one or a few events from their personal experience, and extrapolating it to make a point (I've seen people from the A community do B, so therefore all members of A do B).

When we look at a scientific study, we are looking at at least 30 people stating their experiences.

Therefore, would an ad hominem fallacy containing at least 30 people of a given demographic work just as well as a scientific study of the same experience? Especially when considering the fact that a scientific study involves different people with different ways of interpreting the behavior in question, whereas the person committing the ad hominem is one person, which would give a consistent interpretation of the behavior.

If not, than where does an ad hominem of 30 or more people fail, where the equivalent scientific study doesn't?

Are you asking if attacking a study's credibility is an ad hom?

No, I meant anecdotal evidence. There really needs to be an edit button for original posts.
"Morals are simply a limit to man's potential."~Myself

Political correctness is like saying you can't have a steak, because a baby can't eat one ~Unknown
Poetaster
Posts: 587
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
10/21/2013 4:10:44 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Every informal fallacy (such as ad hom) is just a special case of discursive irrelevance: an invocation of, or appeal to, some premise or notion which does not support the target conclusion. Of course, there are many ways of doing this, so it's taxonomically and diagnostically convenient to give unique names to the most common special cases (ad pop, ad bac, appeal to authority, etc.).
"The book you are looking for hasn't been written yet. What you are looking for you are going to have to find yourself, it's not going to be in a book..." -Sidewalker