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Video games make people more utilitarian

vbaculum
Posts: 1,274
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1/9/2014 4:28:44 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
In case you're interested.

Cool videos at link.

http://science.slashdot.org...


Posted by Unknown Lamer on Thursday January 09, 2014 @03:01PM from the morbid-virtual-reality dept.

First time accepted submitter vrml writes "Critical situations in which participant's actions lead to the death of (virtual) humans have been employed in a study of moral dilemmas which just appeared in the Social Neuroscience journal. The experiment shows that participants' behavior becomes more utilitarian (that is, they tend to minimize the number of persons killed) when they have to take a decision in Virtual Reality rather than the more traditional settings used in Moral Psychology which ask participants to read text descriptions of the critical situations. A video with some of the VR moral dilemmas is available, as is the paper."
"If you claim to value nonviolence and you consume animal products, you need to rethink your position on nonviolence." - Gary Francione

THE WORLD IS VEGAN! If you want it
whatledge
Posts: 210
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1/9/2014 10:37:13 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 1/9/2014 4:28:44 PM, vbaculum wrote:
In case you're interested.

Cool videos at link.

http://science.slashdot.org...


Posted by Unknown Lamer on Thursday January 09, 2014 @03:01PM from the morbid-virtual-reality dept.

First time accepted submitter vrml writes "Critical situations in which participant's actions lead to the death of (virtual) humans have been employed in a study of moral dilemmas which just appeared in the Social Neuroscience journal. The experiment shows that participants' behavior becomes more utilitarian (that is, they tend to minimize the number of persons killed) when they have to take a decision in Virtual Reality rather than the more traditional settings used in Moral Psychology which ask participants to read text descriptions of the critical situations. A video with some of the VR moral dilemmas is available, as is the paper."


Very interesting concept that already exists on a lessor form in a lot of RPGs these days. I think the problem is that the game does not reveal who each person is. IE in the train example, the lone man might be the nicest guy in the world working to feed his 5 children, taking care of his sick wife, mother, and father, while the "group of people" may in fact be a group of thugs that may have been thinking about going on a killing spree before committing suicide. All situational, of course, but the situation/context is precisely what matters; rather than plain numbers.
nummi
Posts: 294
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1/10/2014 5:47:44 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 1/9/2014 4:28:44 PM, vbaculum wrote:
In case you're interested.

Cool videos at link.

http://science.slashdot.org...


Posted by Unknown Lamer on Thursday January 09, 2014 @03:01PM from the morbid-virtual-reality dept.

First time accepted submitter vrml writes "Critical situations in which participant's actions lead to the death of (virtual) humans have been employed in a study of moral dilemmas which just appeared in the Social Neuroscience journal. The experiment shows that participants' behavior becomes more utilitarian (that is, they tend to minimize the number of persons killed) when they have to take a decision in Virtual Reality rather than the more traditional settings used in Moral Psychology which ask participants to read text descriptions of the critical situations. A video with some of the VR moral dilemmas is available, as is the paper."


I tend to go for killing as many bad guys and saving as many good ones as I can. With games it's good there's saved games, fail->load, fail->load. Too bad can't do this in real life, or at least start a "new game"; actions have permanent consequences, so should try going for the best possible.