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Chaos & de Broglie matter waves - hypothesis

Juan_Pablo
Posts: 2,052
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2/2/2014 1:40:59 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
I believe everything in the universe is composed of two basic all-pervading components - the aether component and the vacuum component. Together these two components constitute everything in the known universe, from oppositely charged particles to the elastic space-time medium that General Relativity informs us exist.

But there are important differences between these two components. The vacuum component is a law-less, rule-less substance. I believe a pure vacuum environment ( an environment where the aether component is completely absent ) has the capacity to create a universe like ours.

A pure vacuum environment, being a lawless, chaotic place, has the capacity to create something - a component with boundaries that conforms to elastic, geometric rules.

And these are chief distinctions:

The vacuum component is nothing. It is lawless, rule-less and chaotic.

The aether component is something. It is a substance with definite boundaries that comforms to elastic, geometric rules.

The interaction between nothing and something is the basis of all phenomena in our universe I believe.

Is there a way to test this hypotheis and the descriptions of the terms used ( vacuum component, aether component )?

Yes there is!

If this hypothesis is correct and vacuum is associated with lawlessness and chaos ( randomness ), then matter with less substance in it ( less mass ) should exhibit unrulyness and randomness. In fact, the amount of lawlessness and randomness should be exactly inversely proportional to the amount of mass ( substance ) in an item.

And this is exactly what is demonstrated by the Louis de Broglie's wave formula, which explains that matter can be treated like a probability wave:

wave length = h / m v,

where h is plank's constant, m is an object's mass and v is its velocity.

As mass increases in an object, its probability wave decreases proportionally and it more firmly abides to Newtonian laws of motion. As mass decreases in an object, its probability wave ( and thus randomness ) increases!

Quantum Mechanics already validates this hypothesis!

The attribute of randomness associated with objects in quantum mechanics derives from the quantity of lawless, unruly vacuum in the object.

What do you guys think?
Juan_Pablo
Posts: 2,052
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2/2/2014 2:18:55 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
As you can tell, my position is that firm causality ( and Newtonian determinism ) do not exist, because there is an unavoidable element of genuine randomness that exist in an object that is inversely proportional to the object's mass.

I therefore take a semi-determinist view on issues of causality.
Juan_Pablo
Posts: 2,052
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2/3/2014 4:58:01 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/2/2014 11:08:42 AM, Rational_Thinker9119 wrote:
Yes, QM does debunk causal determinism.

Well, is something like this is the explanation, classical determinism goes out the window.

Of course I have emphasize that this is speculation on my part.
Juan_Pablo
Posts: 2,052
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2/3/2014 4:58:58 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/3/2014 4:58:01 AM, Juan_Pablo wrote:
At 2/2/2014 11:08:42 AM, Rational_Thinker9119 wrote:
Yes, QM does debunk causal determinism.

Well, is something like this is the explanation, classical determinism goes out the window.

Of course I have emphasize that this is speculation on my part.

Grammar correction:

"Well if something like this is the explanation . . . "