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Wedding Massacre Prevented

MoralityProfessor
Posts: 63
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2/6/2014 4:17:07 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
I don't normally post these kinds of things, but I was surprised to see so few news stations reporting it.

Four Arab residents of Jerusalem planned to enter a wedding hall dressed as Orthodox Jews and open fire on the attendants. From my reading on the subject alone, it seems their plan may have been thwarted at some point during their attempt to purchase Uzi sub machine guns from a weapons dealer in the Palestinian Authority. The hall in question could hold up to 1,500 people. Those involved with the planned murder-spree are being charged for their attempted crime.

Source: http://www.israelnationalnews.com...

The story left my mind reeling with questions and thoughts, and here are some of them:

How does someone get to a point of complete moral indifference where they would willingly murder innocent people? More than that though, to open fire at a time of celebration shows not just a moral absence, but, in my opinion, an intrinsic evil. Now, I don't use that word lightly (evil) because I do believe humans are inherently good. And, obviously, even when the lines seem clear-cut, they aren't. I mean, searching for days in city dumpsters for a lost object might seem radical, but if that lost object happens to be a $1,000,000 of lifetime savings, then it's not so radical. A dose of perspective can go a long way.

But if we were to assume they got to that point from religious indoctrination, does that justify their behavior? I mean, obviously it doesn't, but if we had been in their places, would we have opted to do the same thing or stood against it on whatever misguided moral grounds we were brought up with (given this hypothetical scenario)? If we would have done the same thing, does that not justify their actions even slightly? And if not - if these actions were particular to these people - does that make them intrinsically evil? Where is the line crossed?

That's it for now. Any answers would be highly appreciated.
zmikecuber
Posts: 4,083
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2/6/2014 7:03:37 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/6/2014 4:17:07 PM, MoralityProfessor wrote:
I don't normally post these kinds of things, but I was surprised to see so few news stations reporting it.

Four Arab residents of Jerusalem planned to enter a wedding hall dressed as Orthodox Jews and open fire on the attendants. From my reading on the subject alone, it seems their plan may have been thwarted at some point during their attempt to purchase Uzi sub machine guns from a weapons dealer in the Palestinian Authority. The hall in question could hold up to 1,500 people. Those involved with the planned murder-spree are being charged for their attempted crime.

Source: http://www.israelnationalnews.com...

The story left my mind reeling with questions and thoughts, and here are some of them:

How does someone get to a point of complete moral indifference where they would willingly murder innocent people? More than that though, to open fire at a time of celebration shows not just a moral absence, but, in my opinion, an intrinsic evil. Now, I don't use that word lightly (evil) because I do believe humans are inherently good. And, obviously, even when the lines seem clear-cut, they aren't. I mean, searching for days in city dumpsters for a lost object might seem radical, but if that lost object happens to be a $1,000,000 of lifetime savings, then it's not so radical. A dose of perspective can go a long way.

But if we were to assume they got to that point from religious indoctrination, does that justify their behavior? I mean, obviously it doesn't, but if we had been in their places, would we have opted to do the same thing or stood against it on whatever misguided moral grounds we were brought up with (given this hypothetical scenario)? If we would have done the same thing, does that not justify their actions even slightly? And if not - if these actions were particular to these people - does that make them intrinsically evil? Where is the line crossed?


I don't think we can ever really get inside of their minds to truly know their culpability.

That being said, Hillaire Belloc's predictions of Islam rising again to power and violence in The Great Heresies have come true.

That's it for now. Any answers would be highly appreciated.

It's hard to imagine some of the evil that is in the world though... blows your mind sometimes.
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MoralityProfessor
Posts: 63
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2/7/2014 1:47:37 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/6/2014 7:03:37 PM, zmikecuber wrote:
At 2/6/2014 4:17:07 PM, MoralityProfessor wrote:
I don't normally post these kinds of things, but I was surprised to see so few news stations reporting it.

Four Arab residents of Jerusalem planned to enter a wedding hall dressed as Orthodox Jews and open fire on the attendants. From my reading on the subject alone, it seems their plan may have been thwarted at some point during their attempt to purchase Uzi sub machine guns from a weapons dealer in the Palestinian Authority. The hall in question could hold up to 1,500 people. Those involved with the planned murder-spree are being charged for their attempted crime.

Source: http://www.israelnationalnews.com...

The story left my mind reeling with questions and thoughts, and here are some of them:

How does someone get to a point of complete moral indifference where they would willingly murder innocent people? More than that though, to open fire at a time of celebration shows not just a moral absence, but, in my opinion, an intrinsic evil. Now, I don't use that word lightly (evil) because I do believe humans are inherently good. And, obviously, even when the lines seem clear-cut, they aren't. I mean, searching for days in city dumpsters for a lost object might seem radical, but if that lost object happens to be a $1,000,000 of lifetime savings, then it's not so radical. A dose of perspective can go a long way.

But if we were to assume they got to that point from religious indoctrination, does that justify their behavior? I mean, obviously it doesn't, but if we had been in their places, would we have opted to do the same thing or stood against it on whatever misguided moral grounds we were brought up with (given this hypothetical scenario)? If we would have done the same thing, does that not justify their actions even slightly? And if not - if these actions were particular to these people - does that make them intrinsically evil? Where is the line crossed?


I don't think we can ever really get inside of their minds to truly know their culpability.

That being said, Hillaire Belloc's predictions of Islam rising again to power and violence in The Great Heresies have come true.

That's it for now. Any answers would be highly appreciated.

It's hard to imagine some of the evil that is in the world though... blows your mind sometimes.

It sure does. I mean, I was contemplating evil from purely a psychological analysis. If there actually exists evil, does that make a person unaccountable or, at least, less accountable for their actions? And if evil is simply an term arbitrarily constructed by humans that has no firm basis in reality, does that mean we could get to that point as well, where human lives mean nothing to us?

Perhaps, it seems to me, at least, it's like the continuum fallacy. Where we assume that a human couldn't get to that point unless they were inherently evil. But we don't take into account what got them there in the first place.