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Appeal to Ignorance!

Dazz
Posts: 1,163
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2/25/2014 1:45:11 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
{Appeal to Ignorance - An appeal to ignorance occurs when one person uses another person"s lack of knowledge on a particular subject as evidence that their own argument is correct.
For example: "You can"t prove that there aren"t Martians living in caves under the surface of Mars, so it is reasonable for me to believe there are."}
http://examples.yourdictionary.com...

Now what do you think about another example:
"You can't prove that there are Martians living in caves under the surface of Mars, so it is reasonable for me to believe there are not."

Is it also "appeal to ignorance"?
Remove the "I want", remainder is the "peace". ~Al-Ghazali~
"This time will also pass", a dose to cure both; the excitement & the grievance. ~Ayaz~
zmikecuber
Posts: 4,093
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2/25/2014 2:24:51 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/25/2014 1:45:11 PM, Dazz wrote:
{Appeal to Ignorance - An appeal to ignorance occurs when one person uses another person"s lack of knowledge on a particular subject as evidence that their own argument is correct.
For example: "You can"t prove that there aren"t Martians living in caves under the surface of Mars, so it is reasonable for me to believe there are."}
http://examples.yourdictionary.com...

Now what do you think about another example:
"You can't prove that there are Martians living in caves under the surface of Mars, so it is reasonable for me to believe there are not."

Is it also "appeal to ignorance"?

Yes, it is. Affirming or denying something based on lack of evidence is an appeal to ignorance... :P But you can also use inductive reasoning, which looks similar.
"Delete your fvcking sig" -1hard

"primal man had the habit, when he came into contact with fire, of satisfying the infantile desire connected with it, by putting it out with a stream of his urine... Putting out the fire by micturating was therefore a kind of sexual act with a male, an enjoyment of sexual potency in a homosexual competition."
Dazz
Posts: 1,163
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2/26/2014 11:31:39 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/25/2014 2:24:51 PM, zmikecuber wrote:
At 2/25/2014 1:45:11 PM, Dazz wrote:
{Appeal to Ignorance - An appeal to ignorance occurs when one person uses another person"s lack of knowledge on a particular subject as evidence that their own argument is correct.
For example: "You can"t prove that there aren"t Martians living in caves under the surface of Mars, so it is reasonable for me to believe there are."}
http://examples.yourdictionary.com...

Now what do you think about another example:
"You can't prove that there are Martians living in caves under the surface of Mars, so it is reasonable for me to believe there are not."

Is it also "appeal to ignorance"?

Yes, it is. Affirming or denying something based on lack of evidence is an appeal to ignorance... :P But you can also use inductive reasoning, which looks similar.

Yes inductive reasoning is same but I think two different names are for separating the criticism. I don't understand how the "inevitability" of inductive reasoning can be an excuse to commit a fallacy.
Remove the "I want", remainder is the "peace". ~Al-Ghazali~
"This time will also pass", a dose to cure both; the excitement & the grievance. ~Ayaz~
zmikecuber
Posts: 4,093
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2/26/2014 11:34:01 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/26/2014 11:31:39 AM, Dazz wrote:
At 2/25/2014 2:24:51 PM, zmikecuber wrote:
At 2/25/2014 1:45:11 PM, Dazz wrote:
{Appeal to Ignorance - An appeal to ignorance occurs when one person uses another person"s lack of knowledge on a particular subject as evidence that their own argument is correct.
For example: "You can"t prove that there aren"t Martians living in caves under the surface of Mars, so it is reasonable for me to believe there are."}
http://examples.yourdictionary.com...

Now what do you think about another example:
"You can't prove that there are Martians living in caves under the surface of Mars, so it is reasonable for me to believe there are not."

Is it also "appeal to ignorance"?

Yes, it is. Affirming or denying something based on lack of evidence is an appeal to ignorance... :P But you can also use inductive reasoning, which looks similar.

Yes inductive reasoning is same but I think two different names are for separating the criticism. I don't understand how the "inevitability" of inductive reasoning can be an excuse to commit a fallacy.

Appealing to ignorance is when you use something unknown as a premise to support your conclusion.

A is unknown.
Whatever unknown is false.
A is false

Or

A is unknown
Whatsver unknown is true
A is true

Both of these are arguments from ignorance. Ignorance doesn't necessarily predicate truth or falsity... it's just unknown.

Inductive reasoning can look similar, but is completely different.
"Delete your fvcking sig" -1hard

"primal man had the habit, when he came into contact with fire, of satisfying the infantile desire connected with it, by putting it out with a stream of his urine... Putting out the fire by micturating was therefore a kind of sexual act with a male, an enjoyment of sexual potency in a homosexual competition."
Dazz
Posts: 1,163
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2/26/2014 11:38:45 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/26/2014 11:34:01 AM, zmikecuber wrote:
At 2/26/2014 11:31:39 AM, Dazz wrote:
At 2/25/2014 2:24:51 PM, zmikecuber wrote:
At 2/25/2014 1:45:11 PM, Dazz wrote:
{Appeal to Ignorance - An appeal to ignorance occurs when one person uses another person"s lack of knowledge on a particular subject as evidence that their own argument is correct.
For example: "You can"t prove that there aren"t Martians living in caves under the surface of Mars, so it is reasonable for me to believe there are."}
http://examples.yourdictionary.com...

Now what do you think about another example:
"You can't prove that there are Martians living in caves under the surface of Mars, so it is reasonable for me to believe there are not."

Is it also "appeal to ignorance"?

Yes, it is. Affirming or denying something based on lack of evidence is an appeal to ignorance... :P But you can also use inductive reasoning, which looks similar.

Yes inductive reasoning is same but I think two different names are for separating the criticism. I don't understand how the "inevitability" of inductive reasoning can be an excuse to commit a fallacy.

Appealing to ignorance is when you use something unknown as a premise to support your conclusion.

A is unknown.
Whatever unknown is false.
A is false

Or

A is unknown
Whatsver unknown is true
A is true

Both of these are arguments from ignorance. Ignorance doesn't necessarily predicate truth or falsity... it's just unknown.

Inductive reasoning can look similar, but is completely different.

Please develop an inductive argument for Martians ;)
Remove the "I want", remainder is the "peace". ~Al-Ghazali~
"This time will also pass", a dose to cure both; the excitement & the grievance. ~Ayaz~
zmikecuber
Posts: 4,093
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2/26/2014 11:40:15 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/26/2014 11:38:45 AM, Dazz wrote:
At 2/26/2014 11:34:01 AM, zmikecuber wrote:
At 2/26/2014 11:31:39 AM, Dazz wrote:
At 2/25/2014 2:24:51 PM, zmikecuber wrote:
At 2/25/2014 1:45:11 PM, Dazz wrote:
{Appeal to Ignorance - An appeal to ignorance occurs when one person uses another person"s lack of knowledge on a particular subject as evidence that their own argument is correct.
For example: "You can"t prove that there aren"t Martians living in caves under the surface of Mars, so it is reasonable for me to believe there are."}
http://examples.yourdictionary.com...

Now what do you think about another example:
"You can't prove that there are Martians living in caves under the surface of Mars, so it is reasonable for me to believe there are not."

Is it also "appeal to ignorance"?

Yes, it is. Affirming or denying something based on lack of evidence is an appeal to ignorance... :P But you can also use inductive reasoning, which looks similar.

Yes inductive reasoning is same but I think two different names are for separating the criticism. I don't understand how the "inevitability" of inductive reasoning can be an excuse to commit a fallacy.

Appealing to ignorance is when you use something unknown as a premise to support your conclusion.

A is unknown.
Whatever unknown is false.
A is false

Or

A is unknown
Whatsver unknown is true
A is true

Both of these are arguments from ignorance. Ignorance doesn't necessarily predicate truth or falsity... it's just unknown.

Inductive reasoning can look similar, but is completely different.

Please develop an inductive argument for Martians ;)

P1: If there were martians on the moon, then we probably would have some evidence of their existence.
P2: We don't have any evidence of their existence.
C: There probably aren't martians on the moon.
"Delete your fvcking sig" -1hard

"primal man had the habit, when he came into contact with fire, of satisfying the infantile desire connected with it, by putting it out with a stream of his urine... Putting out the fire by micturating was therefore a kind of sexual act with a male, an enjoyment of sexual potency in a homosexual competition."
Dazz
Posts: 1,163
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2/26/2014 11:49:52 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/26/2014 11:40:15 AM, zmikecuber wrote:
At 2/26/2014 11:38:45 AM, Dazz wrote:
At 2/26/2014 11:34:01 AM, zmikecuber wrote:
At 2/26/2014 11:31:39 AM, Dazz wrote:
At 2/25/2014 2:24:51 PM, zmikecuber wrote:
At 2/25/2014 1:45:11 PM, Dazz wrote:
{Appeal to Ignorance - An appeal to ignorance occurs when one person uses another person"s lack of knowledge on a particular subject as evidence that their own argument is correct.
For example: "You can"t prove that there aren"t Martians living in caves under the surface of Mars, so it is reasonable for me to believe there are."}
http://examples.yourdictionary.com...

Now what do you think about another example:
"You can't prove that there are Martians living in caves under the surface of Mars, so it is reasonable for me to believe there are not."

Is it also "appeal to ignorance"?

Yes, it is. Affirming or denying something based on lack of evidence is an appeal to ignorance... :P But you can also use inductive reasoning, which looks similar.

Yes inductive reasoning is same but I think two different names are for separating the criticism. I don't understand how the "inevitability" of inductive reasoning can be an excuse to commit a fallacy.

Appealing to ignorance is when you use something unknown as a premise to support your conclusion.

A is unknown.
Whatever unknown is false.
A is false

Or

A is unknown
Whatsver unknown is true
A is true

Both of these are arguments from ignorance. Ignorance doesn't necessarily predicate truth or falsity... it's just unknown.

Inductive reasoning can look similar, but is completely different.

Please develop an inductive argument for Martians ;)

P1: If there were martians on the moon, then we probably would have some evidence of their existence.
P2: We don't have any evidence of their existence.
C: There probably aren't martians on the moon.
You've wrapped the induction in "probability" to differentiate it. Am I right?
Remove the "I want", remainder is the "peace". ~Al-Ghazali~
"This time will also pass", a dose to cure both; the excitement & the grievance. ~Ayaz~
zmikecuber
Posts: 4,093
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2/26/2014 11:58:31 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/26/2014 11:49:52 AM, Dazz wrote:
At 2/26/2014 11:40:15 AM, zmikecuber wrote:
At 2/26/2014 11:38:45 AM, Dazz wrote:
At 2/26/2014 11:34:01 AM, zmikecuber wrote:
At 2/26/2014 11:31:39 AM, Dazz wrote:
At 2/25/2014 2:24:51 PM, zmikecuber wrote:
At 2/25/2014 1:45:11 PM, Dazz wrote:
{Appeal to Ignorance - An appeal to ignorance occurs when one person uses another person"s lack of knowledge on a particular subject as evidence that their own argument is correct.
For example: "You can"t prove that there aren"t Martians living in caves under the surface of Mars, so it is reasonable for me to believe there are."}
http://examples.yourdictionary.com...

Now what do you think about another example:
"You can't prove that there are Martians living in caves under the surface of Mars, so it is reasonable for me to believe there are not."

Is it also "appeal to ignorance"?

Yes, it is. Affirming or denying something based on lack of evidence is an appeal to ignorance... :P But you can also use inductive reasoning, which looks similar.

Yes inductive reasoning is same but I think two different names are for separating the criticism. I don't understand how the "inevitability" of inductive reasoning can be an excuse to commit a fallacy.

Appealing to ignorance is when you use something unknown as a premise to support your conclusion.

A is unknown.
Whatever unknown is false.
A is false

Or

A is unknown
Whatsver unknown is true
A is true

Both of these are arguments from ignorance. Ignorance doesn't necessarily predicate truth or falsity... it's just unknown.

Inductive reasoning can look similar, but is completely different.

Please develop an inductive argument for Martians ;)

P1: If there were martians on the moon, then we probably would have some evidence of their existence.
P2: We don't have any evidence of their existence.
C: There probably aren't martians on the moon.
You've wrapped the induction in "probability" to differentiate it. Am I right?

Yeah, usually inductive arguments have the same structure as deductive ones, but there's a word in there like "probably" or "most of these" etc.
"Delete your fvcking sig" -1hard

"primal man had the habit, when he came into contact with fire, of satisfying the infantile desire connected with it, by putting it out with a stream of his urine... Putting out the fire by micturating was therefore a kind of sexual act with a male, an enjoyment of sexual potency in a homosexual competition."
Dazz
Posts: 1,163
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2/26/2014 12:06:00 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/26/2014 11:58:31 AM, zmikecuber wrote:
At 2/26/2014 11:49:52 AM, Dazz wrote:
At 2/26/2014 11:40:15 AM, zmikecuber wrote:
At 2/26/2014 11:38:45 AM, Dazz wrote:
At 2/26/2014 11:34:01 AM, zmikecuber wrote:
At 2/26/2014 11:31:39 AM, Dazz wrote:
At 2/25/2014 2:24:51 PM, zmikecuber wrote:
At 2/25/2014 1:45:11 PM, Dazz wrote:
{Appeal to Ignorance - An appeal to ignorance occurs when one person uses another person"s lack of knowledge on a particular subject as evidence that their own argument is correct.
For example: "You can"t prove that there aren"t Martians living in caves under the surface of Mars, so it is reasonable for me to believe there are."}
http://examples.yourdictionary.com...

Now what do you think about another example:
"You can't prove that there are Martians living in caves under the surface of Mars, so it is reasonable for me to believe there are not."

Is it also "appeal to ignorance"?

Yes, it is. Affirming or denying something based on lack of evidence is an appeal to ignorance... :P But you can also use inductive reasoning, which looks similar.

Yes inductive reasoning is same but I think two different names are for separating the criticism. I don't understand how the "inevitability" of inductive reasoning can be an excuse to commit a fallacy.

Appealing to ignorance is when you use something unknown as a premise to support your conclusion.

A is unknown.
Whatever unknown is false.
A is false

Or

A is unknown
Whatsver unknown is true
A is true

Both of these are arguments from ignorance. Ignorance doesn't necessarily predicate truth or falsity... it's just unknown.

Inductive reasoning can look similar, but is completely different.

Please develop an inductive argument for Martians ;)

P1: If there were martians on the moon, then we probably would have some evidence of their existence.
P2: We don't have any evidence of their existence.
C: There probably aren't martians on the moon.
You've wrapped the induction in "probability" to differentiate it. Am I right?

Yeah, usually inductive arguments have the same structure as deductive ones, but there's a word in there like "probably" or "most of these" etc.

Sorry but I'm confused, wanna make you too lol

What is it then?

P1: If there aren't martians on the moon, then we probably would have some evidence of their non-existence.
P2: We don't have any evidence of their non-existence.
C: There probably are martians on the moon.

And these two (yours and mine) can't be true at same time. Right?
Remove the "I want", remainder is the "peace". ~Al-Ghazali~
"This time will also pass", a dose to cure both; the excitement & the grievance. ~Ayaz~
zmikecuber
Posts: 4,093
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2/26/2014 1:16:49 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/26/2014 12:06:00 PM, Dazz wrote:
At 2/26/2014 11:58:31 AM, zmikecuber wrote:
At 2/26/2014 11:49:52 AM, Dazz wrote:
At 2/26/2014 11:40:15 AM, zmikecuber wrote:
At 2/26/2014 11:38:45 AM, Dazz wrote:
At 2/26/2014 11:34:01 AM, zmikecuber wrote:
At 2/26/2014 11:31:39 AM, Dazz wrote:
At 2/25/2014 2:24:51 PM, zmikecuber wrote:
At 2/25/2014 1:45:11 PM, Dazz wrote:
{Appeal to Ignorance - An appeal to ignorance occurs when one person uses another person"s lack of knowledge on a particular subject as evidence that their own argument is correct.
For example: "You can"t prove that there aren"t Martians living in caves under the surface of Mars, so it is reasonable for me to believe there are."}
http://examples.yourdictionary.com...

Now what do you think about another example:
"You can't prove that there are Martians living in caves under the surface of Mars, so it is reasonable for me to believe there are not."

Is it also "appeal to ignorance"?

Yes, it is. Affirming or denying something based on lack of evidence is an appeal to ignorance... :P But you can also use inductive reasoning, which looks similar.

Yes inductive reasoning is same but I think two different names are for separating the criticism. I don't understand how the "inevitability" of inductive reasoning can be an excuse to commit a fallacy.

Appealing to ignorance is when you use something unknown as a premise to support your conclusion.

A is unknown.
Whatever unknown is false.
A is false

Or

A is unknown
Whatsver unknown is true
A is true

Both of these are arguments from ignorance. Ignorance doesn't necessarily predicate truth or falsity... it's just unknown.

Inductive reasoning can look similar, but is completely different.

Please develop an inductive argument for Martians ;)

P1: If there were martians on the moon, then we probably would have some evidence of their existence.
P2: We don't have any evidence of their existence.
C: There probably aren't martians on the moon.
You've wrapped the induction in "probability" to differentiate it. Am I right?

Yeah, usually inductive arguments have the same structure as deductive ones, but there's a word in there like "probably" or "most of these" etc.

Sorry but I'm confused, wanna make you too lol

What is it then?

P1: If there aren't martians on the moon, then we probably would have some evidence of their non-existence.
P2: We don't have any evidence of their non-existence.
C: There probably are martians on the moon.

And these two (yours and mine) can't be true at same time. Right?

Well I'd disagree with the truth of those premises. But you're right, it's tricky.
"Delete your fvcking sig" -1hard

"primal man had the habit, when he came into contact with fire, of satisfying the infantile desire connected with it, by putting it out with a stream of his urine... Putting out the fire by micturating was therefore a kind of sexual act with a male, an enjoyment of sexual potency in a homosexual competition."