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Theological fatalism

bebil10
Posts: 139
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12/16/2014 8:11:06 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Theological fatalism is the argument that Gods omniscience and free will our incompatible. The argument is against an omniscient (which includes foreknowledge) who gave us free will. This would include a prophetic religion like religion, since for prophecy to exist foreknowledge must be in the set of possible knowledge so god would know the future.

So within the argument anything that god knows will happen must necessarily happen, otherwise god would not have actually known it will happen. This is because a qualifier for knowledge is that the claim is true. So if god knows I will be go to work tomorrow at 8 am. Then it is true that I will go to work tomorrow at 8 am. This is where the problem comes in, since free will would imply that I actually have choices, yet there is nothing I can do other then go to work tomorrow since anything else I would do would falsify the claim God knows i will go to work tomorrow at 8 am.

What we actually have is a contradiction between the statement God knows and we have free will:

When god knows the future, there is only 1 possible thing we can do at any given time. Where as if we have free will we would have multiple choices to do at any given time. So to say god gave us free will and is omniscient is to say that we have 1 option and not one option on what we can do at any given time. This is directly contradictory.

Now I want to clear something up in this argument right away. The argument does not state that God's knowledge is the cause of our actions, it is about what Gods knowledge entails about the nature of the universe that is the problem. All too often when this is presented the theists get hung up on arguments about God's knowledge causing our actions, which simply misunderstands the logical relationship. Logical relationships are based on entailment not causation. So when we say god knows the future, this entails determinism, and with that said, we can rule out free will as a possible cause for our actions. That is the problem

How do Christians resolve this?
bebil10
Posts: 139
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12/16/2014 8:16:43 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/16/2014 8:11:06 PM, bebil10 wrote:
Theological fatalism is the argument that Gods omniscience and free will our incompatible. The argument is against an omniscient (which includes foreknowledge) who gave us free will. This would include a prophetic religion like religion, since for prophecy to exist foreknowledge must be in the set of possible knowledge so god would know the future.

So within the argument anything that god knows will happen must necessarily happen, otherwise god would not have actually known it will happen. This is because a qualifier for knowledge is that the claim is true. So if god knows I will be go to work tomorrow at 8 am. Then it is true that I will go to work tomorrow at 8 am. This is where the problem comes in, since free will would imply that I actually have choices, yet there is nothing I can do other then go to work tomorrow since anything else I would do would falsify the claim God knows i will go to work tomorrow at 8 am.

What we actually have is a contradiction between the statement God knows and we have free will:

When god knows the future, there is only 1 possible thing we can do at any given time. Where as if we have free will we would have multiple choices to do at any given time. So to say god gave us free will and is omniscient is to say that we have 1 option and not one option on what we can do at any given time. This is directly contradictory.

Now I want to clear something up in this argument right away. The argument does not state that God's knowledge is the cause of our actions, it is about what Gods knowledge entails about the nature of the universe that is the problem. All too often when this is presented the theists get hung up on arguments about God's knowledge causing our actions, which simply misunderstands the logical relationship. Logical relationships are based on entailment not causation. So when we say god knows the future, this entails determinism, and with that said, we can rule out free will as a possible cause for our actions. That is the problem

How do Christians resolve this?

Ignore this meant to post in religion.