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What is intuition?

Benshapiro
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6/5/2015 2:34:08 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Intuition is defined as "the ability to understand something immediately, without the need for conscious reasoning.

Does this understanding result from innate knowledge or is it a subconscious synthesis of sensory perception that we're made aware of?
Welfare-Worker
Posts: 1,150
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6/6/2015 9:31:33 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/5/2015 2:34:08 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
Intuition is defined as "the ability to understand something immediately, without the need for conscious reasoning.

Does this understanding result from innate knowledge or is it a subconscious synthesis of sensory perception that we're made aware of?

None of the above.
Definitely not innate, as I understand your usage - potential is there, yes, but effort is required.
The second, not so easily answered.
Certainly sensory input can/may be involved, but is not required.
'Understanding' is a function of the mind, the mind can function without sensory input, we should be able to agree.
In meditation sensory input is negated. By meditation I do not mean only the formal process, or even an intentional process.
Long distance runners who hit the wall reach a mental state where 'normal' physical sensations disappear. The body is not separated from the mind, rather absorbed by it. Mind is in full control. I have heard such experiences described as a meditative state.
With intuition the mind may be considering sensory input it has received in the past, but this is not a requirement.
DanneJeRusse
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6/6/2015 3:51:29 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/5/2015 2:34:08 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
Intuition is defined as "the ability to understand something immediately, without the need for conscious reasoning.

Does this understanding result from innate knowledge or is it a subconscious synthesis of sensory perception that we're made aware of?

It's more like guesswork.
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Welfare-Worker
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6/6/2015 5:53:27 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Previous posts on the subject, including this:

"The intuitive mind is a sacred gift and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift."

"The only real valuable thing is intuition."

"The intellect has little to do on the road to discovery. There comes a leap in consciousness, call it Intuition or what you will, the solution comes to you and you don't know how or why".
- Albert Einstein

~

Steve Jobs reflects in Walter Isaacson's much-discussed biography of him, one of the 11 best biographies and memoirs of 2011:
The people in the Indian countryside don't use their intellect like we do, they use their intuition instead, and the intuition is far more developed than in the rest of the world... Intuition is a very powerful thing, more powerful than intellect, in my opinion. That's had a big impact on my work.
Western rational thought is not an innate human characteristic, it is learned and it is the great achievement of Western civilization. In the villages of India, they never learned it. They learned something else, which is in some ways just as valuable but in other ways is not. That's the power of intuition and experiential wisdom."


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Double_R
Posts: 4,886
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6/7/2015 11:24:26 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
It comes from what I think was best described as an "emotional tally". Every time we learn something we have some sort of emotional reaction to the new information. Those emotions are stored and resurface when we are reintroduced to that information or are presented with scenarios in which that information is needed to react or make decisions. It's what allows us to think as fast as computers, and it is believed that we develop this as a means of survival to prevent us from having to for example sit and calculate our options when being hunted. By the time we figure it out we'd be eaten.

It's not difficult to test either. Really quick, without thinking about it answer the following question: Who would you pick to win in a game of one on one; Clay Thompson, or LeBron James? Now stop. Did you just sit and compare shooting percentages, ball handling ability, size, speed, etc...? No. You merely "felt" the answer. Now if you sit and take some serious unassisted thought about it and make an argument for both players you will more than likely find that whatever player you started with is the player you would end with. What you'll find is that your decision was based on the information you already possess, you just didn't have the ability to instantly bring that information to the forefront of your mind and so your emotions did that for you.

This is also seen in other ways. Do you remember what your teachers would always tell you when taking multiple choice tests... "once you pick an answer don't go back and change it". It turns out that a large percentage of the time an answer is changed it turned out to be correct the first time. This is because our emotions took into account all of the information we posses, but we fail to bring all of that information to the forefront of our mind when thinking about the question in a time constrained scenario.

Also note how woman are noted for having strong tuition, and that they tend to be very emotionally driven while men tend to be more logically driven. The predictable result of this fact is that woman would be more likely to feel stronger emotional responses when presented with scenarios that they may not be able to decipher as quickly and as a result act more on emotion then on logic than their male counterparts, which is exactly what we tend to see. Now acting on emotion isn't necessarily a bad thing, it doesn't decrease your chances of being right, it all depends on what information is driving those emotions.
Sosoconfused
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6/7/2015 3:38:08 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/5/2015 2:34:08 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
Intuition is defined as "the ability to understand something immediately, without the need for conscious reasoning.

Does this understanding result from innate knowledge or is it a subconscious synthesis of sensory perception that we're made aware of?

This is a lecture from an avalanche seminar on the subject of intuition. It's fairly long and boring if you're not a snow nerd like me. The basics are explained upfront though, so it may not be a terrible way to spend 5-10 minutes.

The basics are this: Intuition, or what we call intuition is basically nothing more than a way for us to access previously learned facts, figures, experiences, etc... and analyze them without ever having to use our conscious mind to do so. It's a way to make quick decisions in the subconscious in a sense. It's not some superhuman or supernatural ability. It's simply a way to make decisions faster than you ever could consciously analyzing facts, circumstances, etc....

i believe that this is pretty good explanation of intuition.
Philocat
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6/7/2015 5:23:39 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Intuition is a cognitive faculty (way of knowing) that is a direct awareness or certainty as to the veracity of a proposition. People often underestimate just how prevalent intuition is. Often we find ourselves feeling absolutely convinced of something without verifying it rationally or empirically.

Bertrand Russell took 200 pages of formal logic to rationally prove that 1+1=2, but we are intuitively aware that 1+1=2 even if we were not aware that such a proof existed. Other examples exist, such as our certainty that the external world is real, that other people think like us (not just appear to do so) and that child torture is immoral.

So one cannot simply limit their epistemology to empiricism or reason, especially seeing that one would generally appeal to intuition when asked to justify why they trust empiricism or reason in the first place.

However, intuition can often be wrong. A jilted lover may have been intuitively certain that her partner loved her, yet the fact that this certainty was present did not have any effect on the ontology of whether her partner loved her. Intuition can be right, but only because the intuition corresponds to reality - the presence of intuition itself does not affect the truth of the state of affairs it believes is true.

Furthermore, if one is rationally or empirically mistaken then they can check it, either by examining their logic or re-examining the evidence respectively, but one cannot check their intuition - it is often unverifiable.

So we have a problem here. Intuition is epistemological foundational, and hence we rely on it. Yet intuition is often unreliable and unverifiable.

I think the response here is to bite the bullet - we accept that intuition can be wrong, but we are left with no choice but to use it anyway.
Saint_of_Me
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6/7/2015 9:53:40 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/5/2015 2:34:08 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
Intuition is defined as "the ability to understand something immediately, without the need for conscious reasoning.

Does this understanding result from innate knowledge or is it a subconscious synthesis of sensory perception that we're made aware of?

I like that definition of intuition, "the ability to understand something immediately......"

And would say it is very accurate.

But I feel the big question here--well, at least to me the far more interesting one--is "from where does intuition originate?"

Is it all simply a cognitive process? Materialistic? And brought to fruition from the interaction of the brain's various chemicals? That is, our neurotransmitters, which, after all, account for the vast majority of our emotions. And even our very personalities.

That wold be the materialists' view. Based on scientific reductionism.

But is that all there is? Perhaps there is something more at work here?

I believe there is. An intangible at work. It may have to do with "tapping into" an outside source. Maybe that entity which Carl Jung thought accounted for Synchronicity. And that is some sort of Universal Creative Intelligence. A fabric of the cosmos which shows its underlying perfection. (See my thread on this for my thoughts!)

Some Evolutionary Psychologists claim that back in our primal, hunter-gatherer days--oh, maybe around 50,000 years ago and more, our homo habilis days, that we were much more imbued with this "extra intuition." Which was so acute as to be almost on the level of what today we would call ESP.

But see, while it served us well back then, helping is to survive and thrive (sizing up potential enemies!) today we do not need it as much, in this modern and much more "user friendly" world. So, like it is with a muscle, or learning a new language: ya use it or lose it. And we have lost it.

Food for thought, no?

Good Thread! Thanks.
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Saint_of_Me
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6/7/2015 9:56:43 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/6/2015 11:49:39 AM, janesix wrote:
We are able to tap into morphic fields,and get information directly from there.

Yes!

Are you per chance a fan of Rupert Sheldrake? I am. And have a thread on him from about three weeks ago.

Or maybe you were being facetious?

Would love to discuss Sheldrake sometime if you are of the former.
Science Flies Us to the Moon. Religion Flies us Into Skyscrapers.
Blade-of-Truth
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6/8/2015 4:23:50 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/5/2015 2:34:08 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
Intuition is defined as "the ability to understand something immediately, without the need for conscious reasoning.

Does this understanding result from innate knowledge or is it a subconscious synthesis of sensory perception that we're made aware of?

Gut-feeling.
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janesix
Posts: 3,435
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6/8/2015 1:58:49 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/7/2015 9:56:43 PM, Saint_of_Me wrote:
At 6/6/2015 11:49:39 AM, janesix wrote:
We are able to tap into morphic fields,and get information directly from there.

Yes!

Are you per chance a fan of Rupert Sheldrake? I am. And have a thread on him from about three weeks ago.

Or maybe you were being facetious?

Would love to discuss Sheldrake sometime if you are of the former.

Actually it was due to your thread that I became interested in Rupert Sheldrake:) I had read some of his books before, but now I have a renewed interest.
CorieMike
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6/8/2015 2:58:47 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/5/2015 2:34:08 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
Intuition is defined as "the ability to understand something immediately, without the need for conscious reasoning.

Does this understanding result from innate knowledge or is it a subconscious synthesis of sensory perception that we're made aware of?

There seems to be no way to know if justification is possible or not, hence, intuition is our best attempt to save our basis for declarative knowledge. However, as it heavily relies on these seemings/intuitions which often times appears more likely reliable than not, a defence for it is viciously circular (self-supporting), and inductive at best. It is at the core of the hypotheses we use to live. http://plato.stanford.edu...

I lean more towards a subconscious synthesis of sensory perception we're made aware of, though an innate inclination towards survival behavior ought not be ruled out. We cannot verify if we all inhabit a tabula rasa state at birth. Intuition simply appears to be the pragmatic means/instincts towards a correspondence theory of truth. A foundation for axioms from which we can reason and survive.
****Wisdom Begins In Wonder - Socrates****
The path of sound credence is through the thick forest of skepticism - George Jean Nathan
janesix
Posts: 3,435
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6/24/2015 6:50:16 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/5/2015 2:34:08 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
Intuition is defined as "the ability to understand something immediately, without the need for conscious reasoning.

Does this understanding result from innate knowledge or is it a subconscious synthesis of sensory perception that we're made aware of?

I think we can glean information from the world around us into our subconscious, buth from our five senses,and from an unknown sixth sense that we all have more or less of.
xXCryptoXx
Posts: 5,000
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6/24/2015 7:12:58 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/5/2015 2:34:08 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
Intuition is defined as "the ability to understand something immediately, without the need for conscious reasoning.

Does this understanding result from innate knowledge or is it a subconscious synthesis of sensory perception that we're made aware of?

The second one. It is AKA a "gut feeling."
Nolite Timere
xXCryptoXx
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6/24/2015 7:13:57 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/5/2015 2:34:08 PM, Benshapiro wrote:
Intuition is defined as "the ability to understand something immediately, without the need for conscious reasoning.

Does this understanding result from innate knowledge or is it a subconscious synthesis of sensory perception that we're made aware of?

It is also based on past knowledge you have gained.
Nolite Timere