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The Philosophies Of Steven Hawking

famousdebater
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10/21/2015 4:18:13 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Stephen Hawking is one of the most influential scientists of our century, adding to the work done by Einstein, and exploring the realm of possibilities concerning time-travel. On January 8th, 1942, in the midst of World War II, Stephen Hawking was born. Regarded as one of the top physicists of the modern age, and sometimes referred to the Einstein of our generation, life for Stephen was full of struggles and hardships. His parents Frank and Isobel Hawking moved to Oxford because it was one of the two English cities that Germany agreed cease bombing by the Luftwaffe. Being Oxford graduates themselves; Stephen's parents strongly encouraged him to continue the legacy. As one of the four children in the family, Hawking was often noticed as having a unique level of intelligence. He received ordinary notes on exams, and rarely studied. His true knowledge was his ability to solve conceptual problems, without even being familiar with them. His dad discouraged him from studying physics, as there was no career for it at the time. But physics was his true passion because studying physics allowed him to explain the world around him. He believed that mankind's goal was to understand the universe around us. In 1959, when Oxford University interviewed him for admission, they discovered he was no average student, but a brilliant one. Hawking was accepted to Oxford, where he studied natural science with physics.

Hawking graduated in 1962, and then entered Cambridge University. After falling on several occasions for no apparent reason, he became worried. After seeing countless doctors and specialists, he eventually was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or better known as Lou Gehrig's disease. This disease has crippled him and left him almost completely paralyzed. In fact, the disease was supposed to kill him in two years. The disease's slow progression luckily has saved his life. In the year he was expected to die, he married Jane Wilde and two years later his first son, Robert, was born. In 1973, their daughter, Lucy, was born. Hawking was worried he would die and leave his family stuck in poverty, so he published books on the laws of the universe. These concepts and ideas are how we think of the universe today . He has made what is widely considered the most important discoveries about gravity since Albert Einstein.

In modern-day science, experts agree on two theories; the general theory of relativity and the theory of quantum mechanics. The general theory of relativity, famously introduced by Albert Einstein, "describes the force of gravity and the large-scale structure of the universe, that is, the structure on scales from only a few miles to as large as a million million million million (1 with twenty-four zeros after it) miles, the size of the observable universe. Quantum mechanics, on the other hands, deals with phenomena on extremely small scales, such as a millionth of a millionth of an inch. Unfortunately, however, these two theories are known to be inconsistent with each other - they cannot both be correct".

These two concepts are what many considered to be inconsistent with each other, as mentioned previously. However, Hawking would later introduce a theory that changed the science world. He stated, "that Einstein's General Theory of Relativity implied space and time would have a beginning in the Big Bang and an end in black holes. These results indicated that it was necessary to unify General Relativity with Quantum Theory, the other great scientific development of the first half of the 20th Century. One consequence of such a unification that he discovered was that black holes should not be completely black, but rather should emit radiation and eventually evaporate and disappear. Another conjecture is that the universe has no edge or boundary in imaginary time. This would imply that the way the universe began was completely determined by the laws of science". Hawking has worked diligently in combining quantum mechanics and gravity in a single theory that would explain the origin of the universe and the laws of the universe as well.

Hawking may very well be best known for his discoveries in the fields of black holes. One of the most accredited man in this field, he has written the rules for black holes as we know it. His work in black holes continues to this day. Some of his work in the field of black holes includes being able to mathematically prove that the mass, angular momentum and electric charge of black holes existed. Hawking also proposed that black holes were formed immediately after the Big Bang explosion. In 1974, he proposed the four laws of black holes stating that all black holes "thermally and create and emit subatomic particles, known today as Bekenstein-Hawking radiation, until they exhaust their energy and evaporate").

Hawking would continue his research in the fields of theoretical cosmology and quantum gravity while a professor at Cambridge University. At Cambridge, he held the position of Lucasian professor of mathematics, a position formerly held by Sir Isaac Newton. After Hawking unified the general theory of relativity and the Quantum Theory, Hawking did work on singularities. His singularity-theorems are formulas that tried to explain the production of gravitational fields that are immeasurable in quantities. His theorem stated the Big Bang had infinite density, and that "far from being mathematical curiosities which appear only in special cases, singularities are a fairly generic feature of general relativity".

Hawking has worked with many other famous physicists in the creation of his theorems. Among these are Brandon Carter, Werner Israel, D. Robinson, Roger Penrose, Jim Hartle, and Thomas Hertog. Along with Jim Hartle, Hawking produced a model stating the universe had no concept of space-time. After creating this theory, he worked with Neil Turok to create a "no-boundary" proposal stating the universe has no limits, and is still expanding to this date.
"Life calls the tune, we dance."
John Galsworthy
Fkkize
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10/21/2015 4:30:12 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/21/2015 4:18:13 PM, famousdebater wrote:
Stephen Hawking is one of the most influential scientists of our century, adding to the work done by Einstein, and exploring the realm of possibilities concerning time-travel. On January 8th, 1942, in the midst of World War II, Stephen Hawking was born. Regarded as one of the top physicists of the modern age, and sometimes referred to the Einstein of our generation, life for Stephen was full of struggles and hardships. His parents Frank and Isobel Hawking moved to Oxford because it was one of the two English cities that Germany agreed cease bombing by the Luftwaffe. Being Oxford graduates themselves; Stephen's parents strongly encouraged him to continue the legacy. As one of the four children in the family, Hawking was often noticed as having a unique level of intelligence. He received ordinary notes on exams, and rarely studied. His true knowledge was his ability to solve conceptual problems, without even being familiar with them. His dad discouraged him from studying physics, as there was no career for it at the time. But physics was his true passion because studying physics allowed him to explain the world around him. He believed that mankind's goal was to understand the universe around us. In 1959, when Oxford University interviewed him for admission, they discovered he was no average student, but a brilliant one. Hawking was accepted to Oxford, where he studied natural science with physics.

Hawking graduated in 1962, and then entered Cambridge University. After falling on several occasions for no apparent reason, he became worried. After seeing countless doctors and specialists, he eventually was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or better known as Lou Gehrig's disease. This disease has crippled him and left him almost completely paralyzed. In fact, the disease was supposed to kill him in two years. The disease's slow progression luckily has saved his life. In the year he was expected to die, he married Jane Wilde and two years later his first son, Robert, was born. In 1973, their daughter, Lucy, was born. Hawking was worried he would die and leave his family stuck in poverty, so he published books on the laws of the universe. These concepts and ideas are how we think of the universe today . He has made what is widely considered the most important discoveries about gravity since Albert Einstein.

In modern-day science, experts agree on two theories; the general theory of relativity and the theory of quantum mechanics. The general theory of relativity, famously introduced by Albert Einstein, "describes the force of gravity and the large-scale structure of the universe, that is, the structure on scales from only a few miles to as large as a million million million million (1 with twenty-four zeros after it) miles, the size of the observable universe. Quantum mechanics, on the other hands, deals with phenomena on extremely small scales, such as a millionth of a millionth of an inch. Unfortunately, however, these two theories are known to be inconsistent with each other - they cannot both be correct".

These two concepts are what many considered to be inconsistent with each other, as mentioned previously. However, Hawking would later introduce a theory that changed the science world. He stated, "that Einstein's General Theory of Relativity implied space and time would have a beginning in the Big Bang and an end in black holes. These results indicated that it was necessary to unify General Relativity with Quantum Theory, the other great scientific development of the first half of the 20th Century. One consequence of such a unification that he discovered was that black holes should not be completely black, but rather should emit radiation and eventually evaporate and disappear. Another conjecture is that the universe has no edge or boundary in imaginary time. This would imply that the way the universe began was completely determined by the laws of science". Hawking has worked diligently in combining quantum mechanics and gravity in a single theory that would explain the origin of the universe and the laws of the universe as well.

Hawking may very well be best known for his discoveries in the fields of black holes. One of the most accredited man in this field, he has written the rules for black holes as we know it. His work in black holes continues to this day. Some of his work in the field of black holes includes being able to mathematically prove that the mass, angular momentum and electric charge of black holes existed. Hawking also proposed that black holes were formed immediately after the Big Bang explosion. In 1974, he proposed the four laws of black holes stating that all black holes "thermally and create and emit subatomic particles, known today as Bekenstein-Hawking radiation, until they exhaust their energy and evaporate").

Hawking would continue his research in the fields of theoretical cosmology and quantum gravity while a professor at Cambridge University. At Cambridge, he held the position of Lucasian professor of mathematics, a position formerly held by Sir Isaac Newton. After Hawking unified the general theory of relativity and the Quantum Theory, Hawking did work on singularities. His singularity-theorems are formulas that tried to explain the production of gravitational fields that are immeasurable in quantities. His theorem stated the Big Bang had infinite density, and that "far from being mathematical curiosities which appear only in special cases, singularities are a fairly generic feature of general relativity".

Hawking has worked with many other famous physicists in the creation of his theorems. Among these are Brandon Carter, Werner Israel, D. Robinson, Roger Penrose, Jim Hartle, and Thomas Hertog. Along with Jim Hartle, Hawking produced a model stating the universe had no concept of space-time. After creating this theory, he worked with Neil Turok to create a "no-boundary" proposal stating the universe has no limits, and is still expanding to this date.


Nicely written, but I have two questions

1) Why the bold text?
2) Where exactly is the philosophy the title mentioned?
: At 7/2/2016 3:05:07 PM, Rational_Thinker9119 wrote:
:
: space contradicts logic
famousdebater
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10/21/2015 4:35:44 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Nicely written, but I have two questions

1) Why the bold text?
2) Where exactly is the philosophy the title mentioned?

1) The bold text is so that it stands out more. I've started doing that on some of my more recent threads.

2) The whole thing is a philosophy. Not really his philosophy that he specifically mentioned but the whole thing is generally a philosophical concept about striving for what you believe in and understanding and questioning the world around us. Despite having setbacks.
"Life calls the tune, we dance."
John Galsworthy
TheProphett
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10/21/2015 10:22:58 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/21/2015 4:35:44 PM, famousdebater wrote:
Nicely written, but I have two questions

1) Why the bold text?
2) Where exactly is the philosophy the title mentioned?

1) The bold text is so that it stands out more. I've started doing that on some of my more recent threads.

2) The whole thing is a philosophy. Not really his philosophy that he specifically mentioned but the whole thing is generally a philosophical concept about striving for what you believe in and understanding and questioning the world around us. Despite having setbacks.

Then I propose this question: Is there a difference between theory and philosophical concepts?
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Emilrose
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10/22/2015 12:10:48 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
I only come on (not literally) this thread to see what Wylted had to say...and I am not disappointed.
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famousdebater
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10/24/2015 2:49:08 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Then I propose this question: Is there a difference between theory and philosophical concepts?

Yes.

Theory: a supposition or a system of ideas intended to explain something, especially one based on general principles independent of the thing to be explained.

Philosophical Concepts: Ideas relating to the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality, and existence.
"Life calls the tune, we dance."
John Galsworthy
Sidewalker
Posts: 3,713
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10/25/2015 1:16:24 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
http://www.ukessays.com...
"It is one of the commonest of mistakes to consider that the limit of our power of perception is also the limit of all there is to perceive." " C. W. Leadbeater
famousdebater
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10/25/2015 8:57:43 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/25/2015 8:56:33 AM, famousdebater wrote:
At 10/25/2015 1:16:24 AM, Sidewalker wrote:
http://www.ukessays.com...

Yes, that is my essay.

There is always somebody that thinks I'm plagiarizing.
"Life calls the tune, we dance."
John Galsworthy
trojan
Posts: 24
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10/25/2015 2:32:37 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/25/2015 8:57:43 AM, famousdebater wrote:
At 10/25/2015 8:56:33 AM, famousdebater wrote:
At 10/25/2015 1:16:24 AM, Sidewalker wrote:
http://www.ukessays.com...

Yes, that is my essay.

There is always somebody that thinks I'm plagiarizing. : :

Many writers know how to use someone else's thoughts and twist them enough to make their readers believe they aren't plagiarizers.
kp98
Posts: 729
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10/25/2015 4:57:02 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Yes, that is my essay.

I thought/hoped that was the case. In this suspicious age, an indication of where else you've posted the same text seems a sensible precaution.

But it reads like a potted biography rather than a discussion of a philosophy - what is there to talk about?