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Conspiracy Detractors: Ignorant

GeoLaureate8
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2/2/2012 1:19:56 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
As I have been discussing conspiratorial events, I have come to notice that detractors are even more ignorant than I thought (not ad hom). Every time I bring up a little piece of evidence they say "well that's all you got" and I simply have to laugh. How can detractors be so arrogant yet not have a clue about what theyre talking about and without fundamental knowledge.

They try to treat conspiracies like atheists treat creationism. But at least Atheists know the other sides evidence. They've heard the Teleological Argument, the Cosmological, the argument from Resurrection, the faith argument, the miracles argument, the Ontological, the creation pseudoscience arguments, etc. Atheists know the other side well.

If you know so much about conspiracies, then tell me about the Committee of 300, the Georgia Guidestones, the Planned Parenthood World Population Memo, tell me about Rex 84, tell me about Operation Northwoods, Dulce Base, Zbigniew Brzezinski, tell me about the Knights of Malta, Ordo Templi Orientis, HAARP, Dr. Steve Piezchenik, John Farmer, Cremation of Care, Project for a New American Century, Security and Prosperity Partnership (SPP), tell me about Haliburton's assets, Bilderberg Group, tell me about the Black Pope and the Jesuit Order in the Vatican, deep underground military bases, tell me about the origin of corporate symbols, the wars both sides funded by Rothschild, the Club of Rome, Woodrow Wilson and Jekyll Island, etc.

Are you knowledgeable about any of this? Its very unlikely. So until you learn about the evidence and mass body of research, don't act all arrogant as if youre obviously right and conspiracy theorists are insane.

The conspiracy researchers are the skeptics, the deniers simply believe what their government tells them despite having no evidence (no Osama body, no pics, just baseless claims you took on faith).

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"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
RoyLatham
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2/2/2012 2:37:58 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Pretty much the same conspiracy theories were around 40 years ago, with about the same level of popularity. New one do come and go. some trace back to before the days of the American Revolution. I'm somewhat interested interested in how they get started and are perpetuated.

"Voodoo Histories: The Role of the Conspiracy Theory in Shaping Modern History" by David Aaronvitch is a good readable account of about a dozen popular conspiracy theories of the period since World War II.

A more academic treatment, hence boring but thorough, is given in "A Culture of Conspiracy: Apocalyptic Visions in Contemporary America" by Michael Barkun.

One example is the Bohemian Grove, a place where men of power in government and industry meet in absolute secrecy. It's "men" because with a few exceptions women have been excluded. The secrecy is well-kept, which is consistent with plotting world domination and performing weird satanic rituals -- both of which are widely alleged by conspiracy theorists. Despite the tight security, with admission only upon recommendation of members, the group has in fact been infiltrated.

The reason for the secrecy is that responsible world leaders are generally carrying on like fraternity boys partying in the woods. One of the great joys, apparently, is peeing outdoors, which male great leaders believe to incompatible with the presence of female great leaders. The whole think is worthy of secrecy.

So with the truth revealed, conspiracy dies, right? Not a chance. One of the prime characteristics of conspiracy theories is that contrary facts are simply ignored. Wild stories live forever. The 9/11 conspiracy is full of that. "No part of the Flight 93 aircraft was ever recovered." Actually, nearly all was recovered, and was returned to United Airlines. "The turbine recovered from the Pentagon wreckage is not from a large aircraft." Actually, it was identified as from the compressor stage of the jet engine. That kind of thing repeats endlessly. It works, because most people tend to think that conspiracy theorists care a lot about evidence, when in fact they care nothing about evidence that refutes their theory.

My problem is caring enough to read up on every one of the dozens of conspiracy theories. If anyone cares, the material is available.
Ragnar_Rahl
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2/2/2012 3:29:57 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Of course people know more about (Christian) creationism than conspiracy theories. Christian creationism is one theory with a limited number of rather abstract arguments, and a huge number of adherents. There are tens of thousands of conspiracy theories, each with a fairly small number of adherents, the arguments for which get into concrete details. Some conspiracies happen and some don't, the main "detraction" is for people who believe enormous numbers of them with little evidence to tell, or believe facially absurd ones. Either way, it's your job to present evidence, and not to treat "conspiracy theory" as a package deal--present one conspiracy at a time.
It came to be at its height. It was commanded to command. It was a capital before its first stone was laid. It was a monument to the spirit of man.
Wnope
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2/2/2012 3:40:07 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/2/2012 2:37:58 PM, RoyLatham wrote:
Pretty much the same conspiracy theories were around 40 years ago, with about the same level of popularity. New one do come and go. some trace back to before the days of the American Revolution. I'm somewhat interested interested in how they get started and are perpetuated.

"Voodoo Histories: The Role of the Conspiracy Theory in Shaping Modern History" by David Aaronvitch is a good readable account of about a dozen popular conspiracy theories of the period since World War II.

A more academic treatment, hence boring but thorough, is given in "A Culture of Conspiracy: Apocalyptic Visions in Contemporary America" by Michael Barkun.

One example is the Bohemian Grove, a place where men of power in government and industry meet in absolute secrecy. It's "men" because with a few exceptions women have been excluded. The secrecy is well-kept, which is consistent with plotting world domination and performing weird satanic rituals -- both of which are widely alleged by conspiracy theorists. Despite the tight security, with admission only upon recommendation of members, the group has in fact been infiltrated.

The reason for the secrecy is that responsible world leaders are generally carrying on like fraternity boys partying in the woods. One of the great joys, apparently, is peeing outdoors, which male great leaders believe to incompatible with the presence of female great leaders. The whole think is worthy of secrecy.

So with the truth revealed, conspiracy dies, right? Not a chance. One of the prime characteristics of conspiracy theories is that contrary facts are simply ignored. Wild stories live forever. The 9/11 conspiracy is full of that. "No part of the Flight 93 aircraft was ever recovered." Actually, nearly all was recovered, and was returned to United Airlines. "The turbine recovered from the Pentagon wreckage is not from a large aircraft." Actually, it was identified as from the compressor stage of the jet engine. That kind of thing repeats endlessly. It works, because most people tend to think that conspiracy theorists care a lot about evidence, when in fact they care nothing about evidence that refutes their theory.

My problem is caring enough to read up on every one of the dozens of conspiracy theories. If anyone cares, the material is available.

I highly suggest Them: Adventures with Extremists.

It's by someone who entered the Bilderberg compound with Alex Jones and searched through conspiracy fringe groups to find the "NWO." Same guy who did "Men Who Stare At Goats."

His conclusions are the same as yours.
GeoLaureate8
Posts: 12,252
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2/2/2012 4:15:23 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/2/2012 3:29:57 PM, Ragnar_Rahl wrote:
Of course people know more about (Christian) creationism than conspiracy theories. Christian creationism is one theory with a limited number of rather abstract arguments, and a huge number of adherents. There are tens of thousands of conspiracy theories, each with a fairly small number of adherents, the arguments for which get into concrete details. Some conspiracies happen and some don't, the main "detraction" is for people who believe enormous numbers of them with little evidence to tell, or believe facially absurd ones. Either way, it's your job to present evidence, and not to treat "conspiracy theory" as a package deal--present one conspiracy at a time.

There is only one conspiracy theory that I adhere to. That is the New World Order, the Illuminati, the Esoteric Agenda, the Hidden Hand, the Globalist Agenda.

Different names, same conspiracy.

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"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
Wnope
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2/2/2012 4:37:54 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/2/2012 4:15:23 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
At 2/2/2012 3:29:57 PM, Ragnar_Rahl wrote:
Of course people know more about (Christian) creationism than conspiracy theories. Christian creationism is one theory with a limited number of rather abstract arguments, and a huge number of adherents. There are tens of thousands of conspiracy theories, each with a fairly small number of adherents, the arguments for which get into concrete details. Some conspiracies happen and some don't, the main "detraction" is for people who believe enormous numbers of them with little evidence to tell, or believe facially absurd ones. Either way, it's your job to present evidence, and not to treat "conspiracy theory" as a package deal--present one conspiracy at a time.

There is only one conspiracy theory that I adhere to. That is the New World Order, the Illuminati, the Esoteric Agenda, the Hidden Hand, the Globalist Agenda.

Different names, same conspiracy.



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What new information could be discovered which would lead you to falsify your beliefs about a new world conspiracy that doesn't just involve saying previous evidence has been negated?
GeoLaureate8
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2/2/2012 4:42:25 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/2/2012 3:40:07 PM, Wnope wrote:

I highly suggest Them: Adventures with Extremists.

It's by someone who entered the Bilderberg compound with Alex Jones and searched through conspiracy fringe groups to find the "NWO." Same guy who did "Men Who Stare At Goats."

His conclusions are the same as yours.

False. The author is Jon Ronson. He's the guy who went on CNN saying the Illuminati run the world. His conclusions are not the same as Roy's. See here:

"A new book by an author that had previously scoffed at claims that the US establishment was involved in bizarre occult practices at Bohemian Grove has now released a bestselling book that relates how those same practices evolved over three decades and are still being used today.

Jon Ronson will be known to many readers of this website as the filmmaker who documented Alex Jones' infiltration of Bohemian Grove in July 2000. The program was part of a series called Secret Rulers of the World which aired first in the UK and then multiple times in the US on the Trio Network."

-- http://www.infowars.com...

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"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
PARADIGM_L0ST
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2/2/2012 4:45:19 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
I highly suggest Them: Adventures with Extremists.

It's by someone who entered the Bilderberg compound with Alex Jones and searched through conspiracy fringe groups to find the "NWO." Same guy who did "Men Who Stare At Goats."

His conclusions are the same as yours.:

Shocking conclusion ;)
"Have you ever considered suicide? If not, please do." -- Mouthwash (to Inferno)
Wnope
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2/2/2012 4:47:05 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/2/2012 4:42:25 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
At 2/2/2012 3:40:07 PM, Wnope wrote:

I highly suggest Them: Adventures with Extremists.

It's by someone who entered the Bilderberg compound with Alex Jones and searched through conspiracy fringe groups to find the "NWO." Same guy who did "Men Who Stare At Goats."

His conclusions are the same as yours.

False. The author is Jon Ronson. He's the guy who went on CNN saying the Illuminati run the world. His conclusions are not the same as Roy's. See here:

"A new book by an author that had previously scoffed at claims that the US establishment was involved in bizarre occult practices at Bohemian Grove has now released a bestselling book that relates how those same practices evolved over three decades and are still being used today.

Jon Ronson will be known to many readers of this website as the filmmaker who documented Alex Jones' infiltration of Bohemian Grove in July 2000. The program was part of a series called Secret Rulers of the World which aired first in the UK and then multiple times in the US on the Trio Network."

-- http://www.infowars.com...



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Dude...have you read Men Who Stare At Goats? It's about how army mismanagement, a deranged general, over-inflated budgets, and way to much freaking tolerance lead to the military using psychics.

It has NOTHING to do with Illuminati or a world conspiracy.

MWSAG is one of my favorite pieces of investigative journalism (with one or two things to take with salt). It has jack sh!t to do with NWO.
GeoLaureate8
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2/2/2012 4:59:53 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/2/2012 4:47:05 PM, Wnope wrote:
At 2/2/2012 4:42:25 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
At 2/2/2012 3:40:07 PM, Wnope wrote:

I highly suggest Them: Adventures with Extremists.

It's by someone who entered the Bilderberg compound with Alex Jones and searched through conspiracy fringe groups to find the "NWO." Same guy who did "Men Who Stare At Goats."

His conclusions are the same as yours.

False. The author is Jon Ronson. He's the guy who went on CNN saying the Illuminati run the world. His conclusions are not the same as Roy's. See here:

"A new book by an author that had previously scoffed at claims that the US establishment was involved in bizarre occult practices at Bohemian Grove has now released a bestselling book that relates how those same practices evolved over three decades and are still being used today.

Jon Ronson will be known to many readers of this website as the filmmaker who documented Alex Jones' infiltration of Bohemian Grove in July 2000. The program was part of a series called Secret Rulers of the World which aired first in the UK and then multiple times in the US on the Trio Network."

-- http://www.infowars.com...

Dude...have you read Men Who Stare At Goats? It's about how army mismanagement, a deranged general, over-inflated budgets, and way to much freaking tolerance lead to the military using psychics.

"With first-hand access to the leading players in the story, Ronson traces the evolution of these bizarre activities over the past three decades, and sees how it is alive today within US Homeland Security and post-war Iraq. Why are they blasting Iraqi prisoners-of-war with the theme tune to Barney the Purple Dinosaur? Why have 100 de-bleated goats been secretly placed inside the Special Forces command centre at Fort Bragg, North Carolina? How was the US Military associated with the mysterious mass-suicide of a strange cult from San Diego? 'The men who stare at goats' answers these, and many more, questions."

-- Book Promo ( http://www.infowars.com...)

It has NOTHING to do with Illuminati or a world conspiracy.

Perhaps the book didn't explicitly tie it to the Illuminati but he still went on CNN saying the Illuminati runs things.

But really, you can't see how it proves the conspiratorial point of view? It states that
the political leaders and everyone in the web of control is participating in or influenced by occult practices and rituals as well as secret technology and the sick papillary of these people

MWSAG is one of my favorite pieces of investigative journalism (with one or two things to take with salt). It has jack sh!t to do with NWO.

Open your eyes my friend. Youre missing the big picture.

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.
.
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
Wnope
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2/2/2012 5:13:50 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/2/2012 4:59:53 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
At 2/2/2012 4:47:05 PM, Wnope wrote:
At 2/2/2012 4:42:25 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
At 2/2/2012 3:40:07 PM, Wnope wrote:

I highly suggest Them: Adventures with Extremists.

It's by someone who entered the Bilderberg compound with Alex Jones and searched through conspiracy fringe groups to find the "NWO." Same guy who did "Men Who Stare At Goats."

His conclusions are the same as yours.

False. The author is Jon Ronson. He's the guy who went on CNN saying the Illuminati run the world. His conclusions are not the same as Roy's. See here:

"A new book by an author that had previously scoffed at claims that the US establishment was involved in bizarre occult practices at Bohemian Grove has now released a bestselling book that relates how those same practices evolved over three decades and are still being used today.

Jon Ronson will be known to many readers of this website as the filmmaker who documented Alex Jones' infiltration of Bohemian Grove in July 2000. The program was part of a series called Secret Rulers of the World which aired first in the UK and then multiple times in the US on the Trio Network."

-- http://www.infowars.com...

Dude...have you read Men Who Stare At Goats? It's about how army mismanagement, a deranged general, over-inflated budgets, and way to much freaking tolerance lead to the military using psychics.

"With first-hand access to the leading players in the story, Ronson traces the evolution of these bizarre activities over the past three decades, and sees how it is alive today within US Homeland Security and post-war Iraq. Why are they blasting Iraqi prisoners-of-war with the theme tune to Barney the Purple Dinosaur? Why have 100 de-bleated goats been secretly placed inside the Special Forces command centre at Fort Bragg, North Carolina? How was the US Military associated with the mysterious mass-suicide of a strange cult from San Diego? 'The men who stare at goats' answers these, and many more, questions."

-- Book Promo ( http://www.infowars.com...)

It has NOTHING to do with Illuminati or a world conspiracy.

Perhaps the book didn't explicitly tie it to the Illuminati but he still went on CNN saying the Illuminati runs things.

But really, you can't see how it proves the conspiratorial point of view? It states that
the political leaders and everyone in the web of control is participating in or influenced by occult practices and rituals as well as secret technology and the sick papillary of these people

MWSAG is one of my favorite pieces of investigative journalism (with one or two things to take with salt). It has jack sh!t to do with NWO.

Open your eyes my friend. Youre missing the big picture.

You point to the promo of the book...I READ THE BOOK. The history traced is about a nutty general who started a bat-sh!t insane program based on "research" and eastern philosophy which would lead to soldiers being able to walk through halls.

You read that correctly.

It is called "Men Who Stare At Goats" because the program would teach men to kill with their eyes, and there was a government base with goats they practiced on.

This would have to be Illuminati's most embarassing secret ever. It persisted because the deranged guy was a General and there was so much excess funding it wasn't worth challenging someone so powerful.
Wnope
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2/3/2012 12:46:43 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/2/2012 5:13:50 PM, Wnope wrote:
At 2/2/2012 4:59:53 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
At 2/2/2012 4:47:05 PM, Wnope wrote:
At 2/2/2012 4:42:25 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
At 2/2/2012 3:40:07 PM, Wnope wrote:

I highly suggest Them: Adventures with Extremists.

It's by someone who entered the Bilderberg compound with Alex Jones and searched through conspiracy fringe groups to find the "NWO." Same guy who did "Men Who Stare At Goats."

His conclusions are the same as yours.

False. The author is Jon Ronson. He's the guy who went on CNN saying the Illuminati run the world. His conclusions are not the same as Roy's. See here:

"A new book by an author that had previously scoffed at claims that the US establishment was involved in bizarre occult practices at Bohemian Grove has now released a bestselling book that relates how those same practices evolved over three decades and are still being used today.

Jon Ronson will be known to many readers of this website as the filmmaker who documented Alex Jones' infiltration of Bohemian Grove in July 2000. The program was part of a series called Secret Rulers of the World which aired first in the UK and then multiple times in the US on the Trio Network."

-- http://www.infowars.com...

Dude...have you read Men Who Stare At Goats? It's about how army mismanagement, a deranged general, over-inflated budgets, and way to much freaking tolerance lead to the military using psychics.

"With first-hand access to the leading players in the story, Ronson traces the evolution of these bizarre activities over the past three decades, and sees how it is alive today within US Homeland Security and post-war Iraq. Why are they blasting Iraqi prisoners-of-war with the theme tune to Barney the Purple Dinosaur? Why have 100 de-bleated goats been secretly placed inside the Special Forces command centre at Fort Bragg, North Carolina? How was the US Military associated with the mysterious mass-suicide of a strange cult from San Diego? 'The men who stare at goats' answers these, and many more, questions."

-- Book Promo ( http://www.infowars.com...)

It has NOTHING to do with Illuminati or a world conspiracy.

Perhaps the book didn't explicitly tie it to the Illuminati but he still went on CNN saying the Illuminati runs things.

But really, you can't see how it proves the conspiratorial point of view? It states that
the political leaders and everyone in the web of control is participating in or influenced by occult practices and rituals as well as secret technology and the sick papillary of these people

MWSAG is one of my favorite pieces of investigative journalism (with one or two things to take with salt). It has jack sh!t to do with NWO.

Open your eyes my friend. Youre missing the big picture.

You point to the promo of the book...I READ THE BOOK. The history traced is about a nutty general who started a bat-sh!t insane program based on "research" and eastern philosophy which would lead to soldiers being able to walk through halls.

You read that correctly.

It is called "Men Who Stare At Goats" because the program would teach men to kill with their eyes, and there was a government base with goats they practiced on.

This would have to be Illuminati's most embarassing secret ever. It persisted because the deranged guy was a General and there was so much excess funding it wasn't worth challenging someone so powerful.

Ironically, I wrote that wrong.

The general wanted them to walk through WALLS not halls.

I'm sure someone funded a program to train soldiers to walk down halls though.
MarquisX
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2/4/2012 11:29:35 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Why should I believe the absolute insane sh*t you spout without any evidence?
Sophisticated ignorance, write my curses in cursive
Double_R
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2/5/2012 1:46:32 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/2/2012 1:19:56 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
Are you knowledgeable about any of this? Its very unlikely. So until you learn about the evidence and mass body of research, don't act all arrogant as if youre obviously right and conspiracy theorists are insane.

The conspiracy researchers are the skeptics, the deniers simply believe what their government tells them despite having no evidence (no Osama body, no pics, just baseless claims you took on faith).

Learning the mass body of evidence is not always necessary to understand how unreasonable a conspiracy theory is. The problem with these theories is that they tend to all follow the same flawed logic. For one they disregard every piece of evidence that contradicts their theories, and when forced to confront the evidence head on, they have no choice to expand on their theory to the point of absurdity.

Take the WTC for example, which started off relatively simple. Eyewitnesses heard loud explosives, so they reasonably suspected that bombs were planted inside the buildings. But after sifting through the rubble there were no traces of bombs found. So it must have been that everybody who worked on the site was somehow in on it. As a result Larry Silverstien, the NYPD, and the FDNY must all be in on it. The theorists had to find out how they pulled it off, so they tested the dust and found traces of thermite. Bingo! The WTC was taken down by thermite bombs which everyone was in on. But wait... thermite doesn't have a loud explosion. So how did we know that there were bombs in there in the first place?

As every theory continues to expand, it eventually reaches the point where even conspiracy theorists have to stop and just say "we don't know, we're just asking questions". But that's not what is really going on here. The position of just asking questions is how they protect their religious style beliefs from logic and reason. If they stop making positive claims then they can never be wrong. This of course disregards the fact that if the "official story" is not true then something else is. That something else is not reasonable to believe, otherwise they would have positive claims they could continue to stand by instead of resorting to just asking questions, aka being a skeptic.
imabench
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2/5/2012 2:05:18 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/4/2012 11:29:35 PM, MarquisX wrote:
Why should I believe the absolute insane sh*t you spout without any evidence?

agreed
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LibertyCampbell
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2/5/2012 2:31:00 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Personally, I am less concerned about whether or not a conspiracy is actually happening than being in a financial position where I could benefit from the conspiracy's existence.
"[Society] has no vested interest in continuing to exist." -RP
OberHerr
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2/5/2012 5:20:24 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/5/2012 2:05:18 PM, imabench wrote:
At 2/4/2012 11:29:35 PM, MarquisX wrote:
Why should I believe the absolute insane sh*t you spout without any solid, not supplied by felow conspirators, evidence?

agreed

Fix'd a little. And agreed +2.
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FREEDO
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2/11/2012 2:34:07 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
Not to mention Hassan-i Sabbah and his "illuminated ones", Johann Adam Weishaup and another mistrail of the Illuminati in Ingolstadt as well as his replacement of George Washington, Peyton Randolph and the rituals of Johann von Nepomuk, Thelema, Nazi Occult, Prescott Bush, Aleister Crowley, Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica, Malaclypse the Elder, The Hugh Hefner and George Bush secret family, The F.H.C society, The Beleuchtet, The Shoggoth and the assassination of H.P. Lovecraft, The concealment of the Necronomicon, Project MKULTRA, the supposed death of John Dillinger, COINTELPRO, the secret moon landings that continue to this day, the censored areas on google earth at the South Pole, Constantine and the creation of Christianity.

So much more.
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MarquisX
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2/11/2012 3:08:27 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/11/2012 2:34:07 AM, FREEDO wrote:
Not to mention Hassan-i Sabbah and his "illuminated ones", Johann Adam Weishaup and another mistrail of the Illuminati in Ingolstadt as well as his replacement of George Washington, Peyton Randolph and the rituals of Johann von Nepomuk, Thelema, Nazi Occult, Prescott Bush, Aleister Crowley, Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica, Malaclypse the Elder, The Hugh Hefner and George Bush secret family, The F.H.C society, The Beleuchtet, The Shoggoth and the assassination of H.P. Lovecraft, The concealment of the Necronomicon, Project MKULTRA, the supposed death of John Dillinger, COINTELPRO, the secret moon landings that continue to this day, the censored areas on google earth at the South Pole, Constantine and the creation of Christianity.

So much more.

Lmao. I rest my case
Sophisticated ignorance, write my curses in cursive
GeoLaureate8
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2/11/2012 4:26:23 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/5/2012 1:46:32 AM, Double_R wrote:
At 2/2/2012 1:19:56 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
Are you knowledgeable about any of this? Its very unlikely. So until you learn about the evidence and mass body of research, don't act all arrogant as if youre obviously right and conspiracy theorists are insane.

The conspiracy researchers are the skeptics, the deniers simply believe what their government tells them despite having no evidence (no Osama body, no pics, just baseless claims you took on faith).

Learning the mass body of evidence is not always necessary to understand how unreasonable a conspiracy theory is. The problem with these theories is that they tend to all follow the same flawed logic.

So you claim.

For one they disregard every piece of evidence that contradicts their theories,

So you claim.

and when forced to confront the evidence head on, they have no choice to expand on their theory to the point of absurdity.

More claims on your behalf.

Take the WTC for example, which started off relatively simple. Eyewitnesses heard loud explosives, so they reasonably suspected that bombs were planted inside the buildings. But after sifting through the rubble there were no traces of bombs found. So it must have been that everybody who worked on the site was somehow in on it. As a result Larry Silverstien, the NYPD, and the FDNY must all be in on it. The theorists had to find out how they pulled it off, so they tested the dust and found traces of thermite. Bingo! The WTC was taken down by thermite bombs which everyone was in on. But wait... thermite doesn't have a loud explosion. So how did we know that there were bombs in there in the first place?

That's nice, you brought up one example. An example you made up. And one that isn't true for all conspiracy theories. That's a generalization fallacy. You're saying that one conspiracy argument is flawed, therefore they all are.

As every theory continues to expand, it eventually reaches the point where even conspiracy theorists have to stop and just say "we don't know, we're just asking questions". But that's not what is really going on here. The position of just asking questions is how they protect their religious style beliefs from logic and reason.

More false claims.

If they stop making positive claims then they can never be wrong.

Well sounds like a good strategy to me.

This of course disregards the fact that if the "official story" is not true then something else is. That something else is not reasonable to believe, otherwise they would have positive claims they could continue to stand by instead of resorting to just asking questions, aka being a skeptic.

There are many positive claims. They don't make claims unless there's evidence to support it.

People seem to think that conspiracy theorists just make stuff up, but what they're doing is discovering many unknown facts and connecting the dots.
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
DanT
Posts: 5,693
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2/11/2012 7:51:14 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/2/2012 4:15:23 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
At 2/2/2012 3:29:57 PM, Ragnar_Rahl wrote:
Of course people know more about (Christian) creationism than conspiracy theories. Christian creationism is one theory with a limited number of rather abstract arguments, and a huge number of adherents. There are tens of thousands of conspiracy theories, each with a fairly small number of adherents, the arguments for which get into concrete details. Some conspiracies happen and some don't, the main "detraction" is for people who believe enormous numbers of them with little evidence to tell, or believe facially absurd ones. Either way, it's your job to present evidence, and not to treat "conspiracy theory" as a package deal--present one conspiracy at a time.

There is only one conspiracy theory that I adhere to. That is the New World Order, the Illuminati, the Esoteric Agenda, the Hidden Hand, the Globalist Agenda.

Different names, same conspiracy.



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When someone argues the illuminate or Freemasons are plotting a new world order; I can immediately tell they are misinformed.

The illuminati were a short lived, secret fraternity, based on the Freemasons, and influenced by the enlightenment. They were not what Angels and Demons paints them out to be; they were not what conspiracy theorists claim they were.

The Freemason theory is also full of holes; when ever I hear a anti-Masionic theory, it always ends up being false.

So far i have yet to see Proof beyond a reasonable doubt.
"Chemical weapons are no different than any other types of weapons."~Lordknukle
OberHerr
Posts: 13,062
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2/11/2012 8:36:45 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
As a rule of thumb for me, if Im in a group, heavily made up of hippies, or that at least was, I get out of it.
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Official Enforcer for the DDO Elite(if they existed).

"Cases are anti-town." - FourTrouble

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GeoLaureate8
Posts: 12,252
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2/11/2012 4:00:58 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/11/2012 7:51:14 AM, DanT wrote:
At 2/2/2012 4:15:23 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
At 2/2/2012 3:29:57 PM, Ragnar_Rahl wrote:
Of course people know more about (Christian) creationism than conspiracy theories. Christian creationism is one theory with a limited number of rather abstract arguments, and a huge number of adherents. There are tens of thousands of conspiracy theories, each with a fairly small number of adherents, the arguments for which get into concrete details. Some conspiracies happen and some don't, the main "detraction" is for people who believe enormous numbers of them with little evidence to tell, or believe facially absurd ones. Either way, it's your job to present evidence, and not to treat "conspiracy theory" as a package deal--present one conspiracy at a time.

There is only one conspiracy theory that I adhere to. That is the New World Order, the Illuminati, the Esoteric Agenda, the Hidden Hand, the Globalist Agenda.

Different names, same conspiracy.

When someone argues the illuminate or Freemasons are plotting a new world order; I can immediately tell they are misinformed.

The illuminati were a short lived, secret fraternity, based on the Freemasons, and influenced by the enlightenment.

Apparently you havent done enough research on the issue.

They were not what Angels and Demons paints them out to be;

Angels and Demons is fiction, it's minformation.

they were not what conspiracy theorists claim they were.

The Freemason theory is also full of holes; when ever I hear a anti-Masionic theory, it always ends up being false.

You dont even understand the theories youre bashing. Those are not separate theories.

Have you not read what Adam Weishaupt himself said?

"The great strength of our Order lies in its concealment; let it never
appear in any place in its own name, but always concealed by another
name, and another occupation. None is fitter than the lower degrees of
Freemasonry; the public is accustomed to it, expects little from it,
and therefore takes little notice of it."
- Adam Weishaupt (founder of Bavarian Illuminati)

So far i have yet to see Proof beyond a reasonable doubt.

You apparently havent done any substantial amount of investigation into the issue.

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"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat