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How to vote?

ilovgoogle
Posts: 12
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8/20/2009 11:23:37 AM
Posted: 7 years ago
I've had this idea for a debate topic going around in my head for a while and I'd like to know some peoples thoughts. People who are elected are supposed to represent the constituency they were voted from and therefore; always vote the way the constituency wants you to vote. If you disagree with you constituency then should do you vote with your own beliefs or the popular opinion?
regebro
Posts: 1,152
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8/20/2009 12:45:19 PM
Posted: 7 years ago
At 8/20/2009 11:23:37 AM, ilovgoogle wrote:
I've had this idea for a debate topic going around in my head for a while and I'd like to know some peoples thoughts. People who are elected are supposed to represent the constituency they were voted from and therefore; always vote the way the constituency wants you to vote. If you disagree with you constituency then should do you vote with your own beliefs or the popular opinion?

This question IMO shows a basic flaw in the idea of single-person constituencies. You can't vote with the majority of your constituency in all cases. If you did, why have an election, first of all?
So prove me wrong, then.
JBlake
Posts: 4,634
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8/20/2009 12:58:00 PM
Posted: 7 years ago
Basically you are asking a question that has been asked since the beginning of republican government. Is the role of our representatives similar to that of a filter (as Madison proposes in Federalist #10) or that of a mirror (as Melancton Smith responded)?
TombLikeBomb
Posts: 639
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8/25/2009 2:08:58 PM
Posted: 7 years ago
A representative should vote according to the will (preferably general, not majority) of those affected by his votes, not merely his contituency. Compromises should perhaps be made for the sake of re-election, but for the general stake in re-election, not personal.
From the time of the progressive era with the rise of public schooling through the post-WWII period, capital invaded the time workers had liberated from waged work and shaped it for purposes of social control. Perhaps the most obvious moment of this colonization was the re-incarceration in schools of the young (who were expelled from the factories by child labor laws) such that what might have been free time was structured to convert their life energies into labor power.