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Why American Healthcare costs are high.

JaxsonRaine
Posts: 3,606
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7/8/2012 2:44:02 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
It's stupid. This is so easy to figure out, but nobody acts like they can figure it out.

he US leads the world in obesity rates, and obese people pay $1,500+ per year more than non-obese.

The US leads(or nearly) the world in diabetes rates. Diabetics spend 2.3 times as much on healthcare than non-diabetics.

The US pays double the price for branded prescription drugs compared with Europe. Europe uses price controls, and pharmaceutical companies lose money on drugs they sell there. They make their profit by jacking up the price in America.

Surgeons, Doctors, and Nurses earn approximately double in the US compared to the OECD average.

Traffic accident mortality rates in the US are double the OECD average, and total accident rates are triple.

The 'overpayment' of Americans on healthcare for each category are as follows:
Obesity: $95 billion
Diabetes: $115 billion
Prescriptions: $125 billion
Salaries: $220 billion+
Traffic: $100 billion

Or $2,100 per person.

Interestingly, in 2006 the US was only $1900 per capita above the trend line for spending across countries. I just thought, maybe, some of you might be interested in the real reasons why US healthcare costs more than it 'should'.

Overpayments were calculated by taking the percentage difference between the US and OECD average. Most figures were rounded slightly(less than 1%).

I have a sneaky suspician that if all factors were taken into account(including the cost of Americans for 'paying' for the uninsured), America's healthcare system would actually be cheaper than almost anyone elses(adjusted for GDP, of course).
twocupcakes: 15 = 13
JaxsonRaine
Posts: 3,606
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7/8/2012 2:47:29 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
And no, I didn't keep my sources up. If anyone is interested, data came from:

Census, CDC, OECD, WHO, ADA(diabetes one), NHTSA, International version of NHTSA, and probably a few more. I don't really feel like being all source-y tonight, sorry.
twocupcakes: 15 = 13