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Thought police?

Khaos_Mage
Posts: 23,214
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5/8/2013 11:31:02 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
http://beforeitsnews.com...

Apparently, Lauryn Hill is to seek counseling for her believing in "conspiracy theories" as part of her punishment for tax evasion. I use quotes because this is what the judge called it. The theory is something about slaves in the music industry or something.

While people are saying this is over the line and Orwellian, I am not so sure.

To my understanding, her defense was her belief in this "conspircacy theory". In other words, if it wasn't for her thoughts on the matter, the crime would have been averted. Is this any different that a restraining order against a battered spouse? I lose my freedom of speech and assembly, simply because I think it's okay to beat my wife.

Furthermore, had her defense been not wanting to fund a war, not wanting to pay, forgetting to file, or something similar, does anyone think she would be sentenced to counceling, regardless if she believed in the "conspiracy theory" or not?

I don't think this is any more outragous than anger management or drug rehab; all are designed to prevent further breaking of the law.
My work here is, finally, done.
drafterman
Posts: 18,870
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5/8/2013 11:40:01 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
Could you have picked a better article? The headline places quotes around "conspiracy theories" as you do, because that is what the judge said. But what about the quotes around "re-education?" Why are there quotes there? Did the judge sentence her to "re-education?" Because that would be horrible and that's what the headline seems to imply.

Beyond the typical misrepresentation that the media does to court proceedings, I don't think I can make a judgment without further information. If her conspiracy theories indicate some sort of psychological impairment, then counseling may be warranted, not to instill a certain POV, as the "re-education" headline implies, but to see if there is, in fact, an issue going on.

Mentally healthy people can believe in conspiracy theories, but I don't think there is denying that mentally ill people subscribing to them as well, with said theories being evident of paranoia as a symptom of a disease.
Khaos_Mage
Posts: 23,214
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5/8/2013 3:05:02 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/8/2013 11:40:01 AM, drafterman wrote:
Could you have picked a better article? The headline places quotes around "conspiracy theories" as you do, because that is what the judge said. But what about the quotes around "re-education?" Why are there quotes there? Did the judge sentence her to "re-education?" Because that would be horrible and that's what the headline seems to imply.

Beyond the typical misrepresentation that the media does to court proceedings, I don't think I can make a judgment without further information. If her conspiracy theories indicate some sort of psychological impairment, then counseling may be warranted, not to instill a certain POV, as the "re-education" headline implies, but to see if there is, in fact, an issue going on.

Mentally healthy people can believe in conspiracy theories, but I don't think there is denying that mentally ill people subscribing to them as well, with said theories being evident of paranoia as a symptom of a disease.

I know this article, and the website, are horribly biased. I found this article on my Facebook wall. I am more or less asking a hypothetical based on this real event, as I am not believing anything that this website has to say wholeheartedly. I am only dealing with what I assume are actual facts: the sentence of counseling based on her beliefs.

Do you think that it is a fair sentence (the couseling) if Hill was mentally normal, but believed in the CT?
Do you think her using the CT as a defense warrants the sentence, assuming she did and is mentally stable?
My work here is, finally, done.
drafterman
Posts: 18,870
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5/8/2013 3:37:38 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/8/2013 3:05:02 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:

Do you think that it is a fair sentence (the couseling) if Hill was mentally normal, but believed in the CT?
Do you think her using the CT as a defense warrants the sentence, assuming she did and is mentally stable?

If there is no indication of any sort of abnormality or extreme issues, then I don't think it's warranted. I think of it this way, if you have rage issues that lead to the commission of a crime, then the court can sentence you to anger management, even if you -otherwise- have no mental abnormalities.

So I can kind of see it in this light. It's one thing to believe in CT's, but it's another thing to act on them. If I believe that you are a body-snatched alien, that's one thing. If I believe that you are a body-snatched alien and try to kill you, that's another.
tBoonePickens
Posts: 3,266
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5/8/2013 4:36:17 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
As a singer she's great...as a person, she's a total turd. There are many artists like her.
WOS
: At 10/3/2012 4:28:52 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
: Without nothing existing, you couldn't have something.
ConservativeAmerican
Posts: 1,676
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5/8/2013 8:18:32 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 5/8/2013 11:40:01 AM, drafterman wrote:
Could you have picked a better article? The headline places quotes around "conspiracy theories" as you do, because that is what the judge said. But what about the quotes around "re-education?" Why are there quotes there? Did the judge sentence her to "re-education?" Because that would be horrible and that's what the headline seems to imply.

Beyond the typical misrepresentation that the media does to court proceedings, I don't think I can make a judgment without further information. If her conspiracy theories indicate some sort of psychological impairment, then counseling may be warranted, not to instill a certain POV, as the "re-education" headline implies, but to see if there is, in fact, an issue going on.

Mentally healthy people can believe in conspiracy theories, but I don't think there is denying that mentally ill people subscribing to them as well, with said theories being evident of paranoia as a symptom of a disease.

Did you read the article? It said the judge did the counseling due to her conspiracy theories.