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Templar Semantics

DanT
Posts: 5,693
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8/7/2013 5:35:05 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Because I know someone will point me to the Religion, Economics, or History Forum, let me first start off by explaining why I placed this thread here. This is a political topic, as it deals with the politics between the Templar order and Church Laws.

During the time of the Templar Knights, it was illegal to charge interest. The Templar order started the first modern banking system, and they charged interest. The reason they got away with charging interest was because they did not call it "interest" they called it "rent". Now this is purely semantics, because what they called "rent" was clearly outlawed; simply because they called it something else, does not make it something else.

"What"s in a name? that which we call a roseBy any other name would smell as sweet;" ~ William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliette

or as Lincoln would put it;

"How many legs does a dog have if you call the tail a leg? Four. Calling a tail a leg doesn't make it a leg." ~ Abraham Lincoln

These types of semantics are used all the time when interpreting the constitution. You can only stretch the law so far before it breaks.
"Chemical weapons are no different than any other types of weapons."~Lordknukle
Bullish
Posts: 3,527
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8/7/2013 7:58:09 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I recently learned about Jewish "eruvs". Apparently, certain peoples such as the Orthodox Jews are not allowed to carry certain objects outside of there homes on the Shabbat. So they hang strings around a community (it could be very large - think unbroken telephone lines) and call those "walls" of their "home".

Semantics work whenever we want them to.
0x5f3759df
DetectableNinja
Posts: 6,043
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8/7/2013 8:29:58 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Knights Templar*

or

Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ and of the Temple of Solomon*
Think'st thou heaven is such a glorious thing?
I tell thee, 'tis not half so fair as thou
Or any man that breathes on earth.

- Christopher Marlowe, Doctor Faustus
DanT
Posts: 5,693
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8/7/2013 9:48:12 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 8/7/2013 8:29:58 PM, DetectableNinja wrote:
Knights Templar*

or

Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ and of the Temple of Solomon*

Pauperes commilitones Christi Templique Salomonici
"Chemical weapons are no different than any other types of weapons."~Lordknukle
airmax1227
Posts: 13,233
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8/7/2013 10:52:18 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 8/7/2013 7:58:09 PM, Bullish wrote:
I recently learned about Jewish "eruvs". Apparently, certain peoples such as the Orthodox Jews are not allowed to carry certain objects outside of there homes on the Shabbat. So they hang strings around a community (it could be very large - think unbroken telephone lines) and call those "walls" of their "home".

Semantics work whenever we want them to.

I don't really think the eruv thing qualifies as 'semantics'.

The rule is about carrying items from an established private area into a public one, but it can be allowed if the "public area" is specifically designated as a "private" area, though it can still be a public area in "real" terms. This can be done with the method specified and keeps the intentions of the rule in place. Ultimately it just means that people abiding by these rules can carry a prayer book from their home to a synagogue, or carry their keys. These are fairly practical aspects that require this specific intentional area to be set up.

I recall the community I grew up in as a child didn't have an eruv. When it finally did build one when I was a teenager (which is not an inexpensive thing) it was pretty significant.

In the context of your point, it's not as if there was some rule that existed and Jews just designed some loop hole, this has always been in the spirit of the rule and an eruv isn't an easy thing to establish and to keep kosher.
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