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The College of Social Experimentation!

xXCryptoXx
Posts: 5,000
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1/5/2014 9:06:09 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
This is a college in which there are professors who still teach subjects and offer the opportunity to get degrees in whatever. Basically its a regular college.

WITH A TWIST!

In addition to taking classes, all students must live at the College and have all necessities with them while they live there (Entertainment, hygienics, ect.)

Every school year the students operate under a different social system. All teachers will double as law enforcers appropriate to the year's social system. In the context of of the school operating under anarchy, teachers would act as "safety nets" to make sure things don't get too out of hand.

The social systems would cycle, for example:

Year 1: Liberalism
Year 2: Conservatism
Year 3: Communism
Year 4: Libertarianism
Year 5: Dictatorship
Year 6: Anarchy
Year 7: Original student submitted social system
Year 8: Recycle back to liberalism

Of course there would probably be more systems than this.

Every year's social system and it's effectiveness would be documented.

Teachers would be all-together exempt from participating in the social system for the most part and expected to do their jobs, however the students are the ones primarily affected here.

For example, under Anarchy a teacher would still be expected to do their job. However under Liberalism the teacher can choose to distribute all pencils in the classroom equally among students.

Thoughts?
Nolite Timere
airmax1227
Posts: 13,241
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1/6/2014 3:30:16 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
I'm not sure I understand how this works.

Granting the existence of the school and the way it works, I'm not sure how implementation would be inclusive of the ideologies.

Since economics is a large part of them, there would have to be an economic system in place.

So the students would, in addition to taking classes, be required to have jobs within this school to develop an economy, and that economy would have to be foundational and limited to the school.

Granting that, I'm not sure how certain ideologies would apply.

In year one can the students get abortions? But not in year 2?

This naturally assumed US liberal-conservative basis and only that issue for example. What other issues are we talking about here?

Will the school be less likely do declare war in year 1 versus 2?
Will civil rights be less of an emphasis in year 2?

In year 3 I think it would be fair to assume that the school would have ownership of the means of production. But wouldn't this be true anyway in all other years?

Or would the students be able to be independent capitalists within the school economic system in every year other than year 3?

In year 4, limited central control would lead to the same problematic implications in year 5, where a dictatorship is inherent to the nature of a school. There's either a dean/principal or a board of directors controlled/elected by someone outside of the control of the students(citizens).

Year 6 would be especially interesting, but I think you touched on the problems with that in the context of a school setting.

I think this idea is interesting, but setting it up in the context of a school for the sake of discussion might be difficult.

Just my initial thoughts anyways...
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xXCryptoXx
Posts: 5,000
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1/6/2014 1:47:02 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 1/6/2014 3:30:16 AM, airmax1227 wrote:
I'm not sure I understand how this works.

Granting the existence of the school and the way it works, I'm not sure how implementation would be inclusive of the ideologies.

Since economics is a large part of them, there would have to be an economic system in place.

So the students would, in addition to taking classes, be required to have jobs within this school to develop an economy, and that economy would have to be foundational and limited to the school.

Granting that, I'm not sure how certain ideologies would apply.

In year one can the students get abortions? But not in year 2?

This naturally assumed US liberal-conservative basis and only that issue for example. What other issues are we talking about here?

Will the school be less likely do declare war in year 1 versus 2?
Will civil rights be less of an emphasis in year 2?

In year 3 I think it would be fair to assume that the school would have ownership of the means of production. But wouldn't this be true anyway in all other years?

Or would the students be able to be independent capitalists within the school economic system in every year other than year 3?

In year 4, limited central control would lead to the same problematic implications in year 5, where a dictatorship is inherent to the nature of a school. There's either a dean/principal or a board of directors controlled/elected by someone outside of the control of the students(citizens).

Year 6 would be especially interesting, but I think you touched on the problems with that in the context of a school setting.

I think this idea is interesting, but setting it up in the context of a school for the sake of discussion might be difficult.

Just my initial thoughts anyways...

It was just a rough draft idea. Obviously very rough.

Every year would be in the context of the social implications of each form of society, and not the economic implications in necessity.

Also everything would be in the context of what the school has to offer. So things such as marriage, abortion, ect. would be left out. Unless the school offered those things which would be interesting...
Nolite Timere
Ragnar_Rahl
Posts: 19,297
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1/8/2014 4:49:51 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Year 3 the dining hall collapses from having only two years of mild productivity for the communist year to consume, and a resort is made to cannibalism, assuming this school is isolated from outside help. (if it's not... well, then it basically depends on which outside faction sponsors the school. The idea is not functional, and really doesn't make sense as a "School" anyway).
It came to be at its height. It was commanded to command. It was a capital before its first stone was laid. It was a monument to the spirit of man.
Ragnar_Rahl
Posts: 19,297
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1/8/2014 4:51:09 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
Basically, you have to have an island to do this, not a traditional college. Otherwise you're not really testing anything. "the social implications" in the context of "what colleges offer" makes no sense whatsoever.
It came to be at its height. It was commanded to command. It was a capital before its first stone was laid. It was a monument to the spirit of man.
ConservativePolitico
Posts: 8,210
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1/9/2014 3:48:07 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Sounds interesting... but I feel like the experiment would take a twist and certain power groups would take over under certain systems and either A) prolong their preferred system or B) lead to social tension and possibly even serious conflict.

Changing a social system under any setting is always turbulent.
Juan_Pablo
Posts: 2,052
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1/9/2014 4:06:48 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
It sounds interesting, crypto. But I think the college would have a lot of law suits leveled at it after graduated students complain how its effected them. I think your idea would work better if it were a video game, and maybe the school was a country or a city or something.

My consultation advice is that it sounds like a very risky investment, crypto. I think it might work better as a game or in a choose-your-own adventure book.