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The KGB agent we all love.

Skynet
Posts: 674
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4/16/2014 6:28:53 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
No, not Anna Chapman.

Yuri Bezmenov!

Ok, if you're a Communist, or even sort of left leaning you probably don't like him, if you know of him.

He was stationed in India and placed in the KGB press front Novosti Press. He became disillusioned and defected to Canada, if my memory serves me.

After being debriefed, he assumed the identity of Thomas Schuman, mild-mannered meteorologist. When he was discovered by the Soviets, they sought to discredit him, and so he had nothing to lose by going public about his prior activities.

Among his claims:

KGB activity mostly centered around propaganda to affect disillusionment in government, religion, rejection of native values, and encouraging latent social ills of the target society. Leaders such as politicians, religious leaders, community leaders, influential artists in every field, celebrities, educational leaders, and media figures were primary targets.

If the targets were inclined to be favorable toward Marxist ideas or anything at all in the USSR, they were encouraged to be more so in a positive manner. Any behavior that disrupted a target society was also encouraged.

If the targets were neutral or ignorant, or even slightly against Marxism, and if they could be encouraged to visit the USSR, they were thrown into a festive atmosphere that involved a steady diet of alcohol and prearranged nice things to see. At the end of the tour, the steady stream of booze was abruptly cut off, and it was insinuated that the guests had, regrettably, done some things they would rather folks back home not know about. Oh, by the way, here's some good things you can say about Soviet Russia when you get home. We'll be in touch.

Yuri goes into a lot more detail in the videos. The first one is better than the second. The interviewer in the second is kind of...bad.

Anyway, he said in 1984 that the plan had worked better with the U.S. than most propaganda targets because, unlike Russia and most Asian countries, the U.S. was ideologically open to outside influence. (Many countries, even ones you might think of as Progressive today, have strict laws and social taboos about bringing in outside cultural influence.)

Thoughts? Questions? Flamings?
One perk to being a dad is you get to watch cartoons again without explaining yourself.
Jifpop09
Posts: 2,243
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4/16/2014 6:30:24 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 4/16/2014 6:28:53 PM, Skynet wrote:
No, not Anna Chapman.

Yuri Bezmenov!




Ok, if you're a Communist, or even sort of left leaning you probably don't like him, if you know of him.

He was stationed in India and placed in the KGB press front Novosti Press. He became disillusioned and defected to Canada, if my memory serves me.

After being debriefed, he assumed the identity of Thomas Schuman, mild-mannered meteorologist. When he was discovered by the Soviets, they sought to discredit him, and so he had nothing to lose by going public about his prior activities.

Among his claims:

KGB activity mostly centered around propaganda to affect disillusionment in government, religion, rejection of native values, and encouraging latent social ills of the target society. Leaders such as politicians, religious leaders, community leaders, influential artists in every field, celebrities, educational leaders, and media figures were primary targets.

If the targets were inclined to be favorable toward Marxist ideas or anything at all in the USSR, they were encouraged to be more so in a positive manner. Any behavior that disrupted a target society was also encouraged.

If the targets were neutral or ignorant, or even slightly against Marxism, and if they could be encouraged to visit the USSR, they were thrown into a festive atmosphere that involved a steady diet of alcohol and prearranged nice things to see. At the end of the tour, the steady stream of booze was abruptly cut off, and it was insinuated that the guests had, regrettably, done some things they would rather folks back home not know about. Oh, by the way, here's some good things you can say about Soviet Russia when you get home. We'll be in touch.

Yuri goes into a lot more detail in the videos. The first one is better than the second. The interviewer in the second is kind of...bad.

Anyway, he said in 1984 that the plan had worked better with the U.S. than most propaganda targets because, unlike Russia and most Asian countries, the U.S. was ideologically open to outside influence. (Many countries, even ones you might think of as Progressive today, have strict laws and social taboos about bringing in outside cultural influence.)

Thoughts? Questions? Flamings?

I thought for sure this would of been about Putin.
Leader of the DDO Revolution Party
Skynet
Posts: 674
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4/16/2014 6:34:00 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 4/16/2014 6:30:24 PM, Jifpop09 wrote:
At 4/16/2014 6:28:53 PM, Skynet wrote:

I thought for sure this would of been about Putin.

He's interesting, but I actually LIKE Yuri.
One perk to being a dad is you get to watch cartoons again without explaining yourself.