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Libertarian vs Classical Liberalism

comoncents
Posts: 5,647
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2/20/2010 6:05:39 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
What is the difference?

I know many do not like wiki but...

"In the 1940s, Leonard Read began calling himself libertarian.[29] In 1955, Dean Russell wrote an article in the Foundation for Economic Education magazine pondering what to call those, such as himself, who subscribed to the classical liberal philosophy. He suggested: "Let those of us who love liberty trademark and reserve for our own use the good and honorable word 'libertarian.'"[65]"

"Enlightenment ideas of individual liberty, constitutionally limited government, and reliance on the institutions of civil society and a free market to promote social order and economic prosperity were part of what became known in the 19th century as liberalism.[55] While it kept that meaning in most of the world, according to libertarians modern liberalism in the United States began to take a more statist approach to economic regulation. Some libertarians have argued it is closer to fascism than state socialism.[56]"

"Ayn Rand's international best sellers The Fountainhead (1943) and Atlas Shrugged (1957) and her books about her philosophy of Objectivism influenced modern libertarianism.[66] For a number of years after the publication of her books, people promoting a libertarian philosophy continued to call it individualism.[67] Two other women also published influential pro-freedom books in 1943, Rose Wilder Lane's The Discovery of Freedom and Isabel Paterson's The God of the Machine.[68]"

"Harry Browne wrote: "We should never define Libertarian positions in terms coined by liberals or conservatives – nor as some variant of their positions. We are not fiscally conservative and socially liberal. We are Libertarians, who believe in individual liberty and personal responsibility on all issues at all times. You can depend on us to treat government as the problem, not the solution."[79]"

So, what is the difference?
Is there one?
NotArrogantJustRight
Posts: 18
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2/20/2010 10:31:46 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
The most expedient explanation is that Libertarianism is the philosophy of the political party in which a personal generally accepts and promotes the economic policy of liberalism (or classical liberalism if you wish). In essence, Libertarianism is a political philosophy and liberalism is an economic philosophy.
belle
Posts: 4,113
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2/23/2010 5:12:37 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
it seems to me that they mean the same thing, but libertarians wanted to differentiate themselves from the liberals of their time. probably could have done with a more creative name, but oh well.
evidently i only come to ddo to avoid doing homework...
Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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2/23/2010 5:19:54 PM
Posted: 6 years ago
I find, from talking with those that call themselves libertarians, that they are more focused on the economic freedoms, and while do care about the social freedoms, seem to put them on the back burners to the economic ones. This seems to give them a bit of a "right" lean, where as those that focus on social issues have a bit of a "left" lean.
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"
Puck
Posts: 6,457
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2/24/2010 5:34:23 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
At 2/23/2010 5:19:54 PM, OreEle wrote:
I find, from talking with those that call themselves libertarians, that they are more focused on the economic freedoms, and while do care about the social freedoms, seem to put them on the back burners to the economic ones. This seems to give them a bit of a "right" lean, where as those that focus on social issues have a bit of a "left" lean.

Eh, social aspects are covered by course from the advocated political policies. The two aren't exactly separate entities. The laws that give rise to the first give rise to the second.
comoncents
Posts: 5,647
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2/27/2010 5:07:49 AM
Posted: 6 years ago
Libertarianism's resemblance to liberalism is superficial; in the end, libertarians reject essential liberal institutions. Correctly understood, libertarianism resembles a view that liberalism historically defined itself against, the doctrine of private political power that underlies feudalism. Like feudalism, libertarianism conceives of justified political power as based in a network of private contracts. It rejects the idea, essential to liberalism, that political power is a public power to be impartially exercised for the common good.[46]

Those who emphasize the distinction between classical liberalism and libertarianism point out that some of the key thinkers of classical liberalism were far from libertarian:

Adam Smith should be seen as a moderate free enterpriser who appreciated markets but made many, many exceptions. He allowed government all over the place.[47]

For example, Adam Smith supports public roads, canals and bridges, though he favored the use of a toll to pay for these public works, so that they would be paid for proportionally to their consumption (e.g., putting a toll).[48]

Adam Smith also supported government regulation of the economy in particular when it benefits the poor or working-class[49], and was opposed to income inequality which he believed stemmed from concentrations of private property ownership.[50]

Many notable classical liberals, such as the ideas of John Stuart Mill[51] and John Dewey[52], evolved into democratic socialism, a political philosophy which most modern libertarians are opposed to for its anti-property stance.

In the mid-1800s, Abraham Lincoln followed the Whig version of economic liberalism which included state provision and regulation of railroads. The Pacific Railway Acts of 1862 provided the development of the First Transcontinental Railroad.[53] Thomas Jefferson, a classical liberal, was opposed to wage-labor.

Alan Haworth argues that libertarianism and liberalism are fundamentally incompatible because the checks and balances provided by liberal institutions conflict with the support for complete economic deregulation offered by most libertarians